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To split or not to split smaller logs

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by whodaman, Jan 25, 2013.

  1. whodaman

    whodaman New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2013
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    59
    Loc:
    Lexington, OH
    Ok, I hope this is not a stupid question, but I hear all the time guys putting on full logs for the overnight burn. My question is this. If you don't split the wood and just use logs, how does the wood fully dry out? Wouldn't the wood still have moisture inside? This would be in an Osburn 2400, I just would like to know if I should be splitting all my wood or saving some small logs for overnight burns. I just don't see how it drys out if not split? thanks in advance for any help.

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  2. shoot-straight

    shoot-straight Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2012
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    Loc:
    Kennedyville, MD
    rounders or limb wood never seems to fully dry out unless its split at least once. i have burned really small ones though mostly as shoulder wood or when im around to burn it up nice and hot.
  3. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

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    3,634
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    NNJ
    I agree, I would rather split some monster splits ( leave them big) than leave rounds unsplit. Maybe if the bark is already off. That does happen often.
  4. blujacket

    blujacket Minister of Fire

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    I have been burning 6" Elm rounds that are awesome. It was a dead tree, and I let season for 2 years. I have burned these all this week and am almost out. I have some Locust rounds 4"-5" that I will burn next year when it gets in the teens too. Get a few years ahead on wood, and you can burn rounds. They last longer than splits I believe.
    Thistle likes this.
  5. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    I like to split everything to help the drying. If it is too small to split, I don't take it. I much prefer monster rounds. Being a hand splitter, I find them much easier to work with. I can set the round down and whack a bunch of splits off it and not have to bend over and grab another round or stand up the one I am working on.
  6. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Anything over 4-5" diameter gets split. Used to leave them in rounds up to 8", but they simply don't dry out!
    Blue2ndaries likes this.
  7. Tinder

    Tinder New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    37
    Loc:
    Howell, MI
    I split anything that's large enough to stand on end without wanting to tip over.

    I originally tried not splitting 5"-6" and smaller rounds after what I read on here from others, but instead I found splitting does make a significant difference and is so easy to do on small rounds, why not?!
  8. Blue2ndaries

    Blue2ndaries Minister of Fire

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    Oct 17, 2011
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    Loc:
    Oregon
    Ditto here...rounds bigger than 4-5" get split.
  9. Ralphie Boy

    Ralphie Boy Minister of Fire

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    Northern Kentucky along the Ohio River
    One more for splitting 4" and up.
  10. jatoxico

    jatoxico Minister of Fire

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    Long Island NY
    I heard a tip that for rounds that are too small to split that peeling off a strip of bark will do the trick. Don't have to strip the entire thing just a strip or two depending on the size.
  11. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    So Cent ALASKA
    I split everything , Birch.
    I split Spruce if over 6 to 7 inches. It dries out well even if un- split if under 7", With a full year of seasoning.
    I'm saying that wood type is a variable.
  12. red oak

    red oak Minister of Fire

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    I have been known to leave rounds that are up to 8 inches. It's best to split them so they dry, but not absolutely necessary.
  13. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

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    Time is the issue - if you want to burn it next season then split em. If you are 3+yrs ahead leave em round
    Thistle and Backwoods Savage like this.
  14. Thistle

    Thistle Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Central IA
    Rarely more than 10% of the wood I cut during the year is green,mainly from a CL scrounge or rare paid job.Most of those rounds over 4" are split at least once. The remainder is dead standing or deadfall.Since I'm at least 5 yrs ahead I leave all 4"-5" rounds whole for long burns/coldest temps,a handful 6"-7" also_Over 7" they get split in 2 pieces,8-10" are split in 4 to 6 pieces.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  15. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Michigan
    This is from last year's cutting. The wood yet to stack here is all rounds. None of those got split. Even yesterday we burned two rounds, both elm. Both were in the 8-9" diameter. Burned nicely. But most times I will split that large of a round. These just happened to be from a dead tree that had been down for a couple years and the bark was all off before they fell. Not much moisture in them. The reason I know is because I split the logs that came right next to these two.

    Wood-2012d.JPG

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