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Too Hot to work, It's 120 degrees in my attic

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by JPapiPE, Jul 13, 2008.

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  1. JPapiPE

    JPapiPE New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2008
    Messages:
    408
    Loc:
    South-West hills of Maine, Red Neck Country
    I did start the day out with good intentions. Cut the drywall ceiling back to accept a ceiling pipe supprt and also i had to move my ceiling fan junction box as it was too close for the woodstove, but was fine with the vermont castings gas stove that I sold for $600. I have an access stairway to the attic which is trussed, but little manuvering room. It's probably a 3 on 12" slope or lower( which means for every horizontal foot you go.. you go up 3" and connect the dots.) . Some old timers would call it a 1/3 pitch, but i learned to break it down into horizontal vs vertical runs. Yeah 120 degress up there today as the outside temp is 80 degress. so i went down to my local trustworthy hardware store and bought a metal ash can with a tight fitting lid, stove gloves, stove thermometer, ash shovel and some misc electrical componets, 2 packs of screws ...Total $80... and I'm just getting started on the small stuff required to operate a wood stove properly. Oh yeah i did buy a round 6" wire brush to clean the chimney. Lucky I did have 4 -6' lengths of fiberglass rod from my old stove days. So I guess the day was profitable.

    It's the getting statrted and getting supplied that is so costly, but next year I'll have everything except the wood, and I might need a new pair of stove gloves as they tend to shrink up while handling hot stuff.

    I found that with burning wood for 9 years my most valuble fireplace tool was a stove rake. I never used tongs as I picked up fallen burning logs with gloves and never needed a poker, as the rake was a multi-tool. It seems to be the one tool that is lacking in a fireplace set...even the expensive ones. I did build my own fireplace rake with thredded rod and several pieces of 20 ounce copper and a HD vice. I'm an old church back woods Mainer and as much as people, from away make fun of us Mainers we are pretty much self sufficcient or know someone who can help and do it willingly. I'm sure there are a million great places to live with great knowledgable people around to help. But Maine is a good place to live. You may see less Puritanical values in other areas of the country, maine is fine country. Damn i just noticed i was posting in the pellet section and this forum is so fickle that if you try to transfer posts to another section you lose the whole damn thing...Sorry about the placement of this post

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