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Too much wood!

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by carbon neutral, Aug 27, 2009.

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  1. carbon neutral

    carbon neutral Feeling the Heat

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    Here is an unusual problem.
    I just bought a new house and it has way too many trees in the front yard. I estimate I will be cutting about 55 trees down, some as big as 3' at the base. In all I will probably end up with 30 cord. I will burn about 3 1/2 cord a year. I have from my previous house 7 seasoned, split cord and about 3 1/2 unseasoned split cord. In other words some of this wood will not be burned for 12 years from when it is cut. What is the best way to preserve this wood short of dipping it in wax? I am thinking stack it with an excavator log length then pull of a couple logs each year to split and stack.
    Any other thoughts besides "give me some"

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  2. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    log length would be best
  3. Shipper50

    Shipper50 Minister of Fire

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    Can you cut them down over time? I would think thinning them out over time would be better than cutting them all down then not having a place to store them.

    Just a thought,
    Shipper
  4. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    I'm jealous, why not just sell some you firewood miser. :lol:
  5. KeepItNatural

    KeepItNatural New Member

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    Part of what I find so attractive about burning wood is that the fuel source is renewable, and sustainable, to an extent. Wood IS renewable if we replace what we cut down. So while I can sympathize with your position of wanting to cut down trees that are in your way, perhaps you can be more selective right now and only take down that which is really in your way, and then over time take down more as you need it.
    However, if you need to take them all down aside from keeping them log length, I'd say just make sure they're not laying on the ground. Connecticut is a rocky area, so perhaps you can build something using rocks on your property.
  6. Wet1

    Wet1 Minister of Fire

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    Keep it off the ground and it will last a very long time. It will last even longer if it's kept dry.

    If you need someone to take some of it off your hands, I'm right around the corner and have a 14k trailer. :cheese:
  7. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    S.E. Ct. can't be that far from Westchester County, NY. You could store some of it on my woodpile. As payment for storage, I will burn about 3 cords/year.
  8. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Clarkharms, that indeed is a very unusual problem! Or should I say it would be for me as I can't get too many trees in the front or back yard.

    If I were to tackle that job, I'd simply do it all and get the entire job done. I'd cut to length and stack it in 3 rows. For the bottom I would place landscape timbers, 4 x 4's, railroad ties or just some small poles similar to the picture.

    [​IMG]

    Once you get it all stacked, then put something on (top only) for a cover. We use old galvanized roofing but there are many ways to cover the wood pile. Just have it so it doesn't become an eyesore, especially to the ladies.

    If you stack the wood in this manner there will be no problem with a 12 year supply keeping well. Not only that but the wood will be seasoned so good that it gives maximum heat with very little creosote. It means less work cleaning stove and chimney.

    That said, you also can stack it in log lengths.
  9. maplewood

    maplewood Minister of Fire

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    Too bad you have to cut these trees down before their time.
    Keep what you need. Sell the extra firewood (properly sized and seasoned, of course - be the first on your block to do so!).
    Happy burning.
  10. Bad Wolf

    Bad Wolf Minister of Fire

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    "Give me some" was going to be my first smart ass response. I'm in S.E. CT also. That said, log length, off the ground and covered on the top should keep for a long time. The more air circulation the better. If you have "bark to bark" contact it will start to get punky over the years not to mention the bugs.
    The neighbor has some trees that he cut down over 6 years ago, and where they are off the ground they are still in good shape.
  11. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    All of my logs from selective logging 5 years ago are pretty much done, burnable but done, even the ones on top of the 15' piles. I wouldn't leave them that way for too long.
  12. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Your best method for long term storage is the driest method. How do you get moisture out of wood?? - Cut and split it. Cut and split, properly stacked off of the ground with good air circ. is gonna keep it the best in my opinion.
  13. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    Oops, I had the map upside down. S.E. CT couldn't be much further from me and still be in CT. I guess I can't help you out. :long:
  14. Delta-T

    Delta-T Minister of Fire

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    built yourself a log wood shelter, cut/split/stack/season for some time and move them into log structure for long term storage?
  15. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

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    I think wood should last longer cut, split, and dry than in log length. Logs don't season well, and the moisture trapped in them will support fungus, rot, etc. If I had the option, I'd cut, split, and stack a couple of yeras' worth now, and leave the rest as an ongoing project. Too much wood? -that would be a nice problem to be stuck with.
  16. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Stacked log length is just going to be a big rotting moisture pile. Besides, you will need to sell some to pay for the monster bill for stump removal and debris landfill fees.
  17. carbon neutral

    carbon neutral Feeling the Heat

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    My choice to do all the land clearing at once is based on economics and logistics. I will be renting an excavator to run new underground utilities, upgrading to 200 amp, so I can pull stumps with that while the electricians are busy doing their work. I will probably buy then sell a wood chipper to handle all the brush, I have my eye on the vermeer 625 which should suit my needs well. Having landscapers out once to install igs and hydroseed is also much cheaper than having them out several times.
    From a burning wood stand point I agree that the best management would be take what you need when you need it but overall wood is a small part of the equation. Also to be clear I am saving many old growth trees that should do a lot better once the competition for light and soil goes away. I think the yard will look much better with a few beautiful specimens than the over grown jungle it is now.
  18. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    So often I see nice new yards where they thinned out the trees only to have a storm blow through and and destroy what they left. Trees only grow as strong as they need to and have their strength in numbers.
  19. carbon neutral

    carbon neutral Feeling the Heat

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    That is a concern to me but not much I can do about it. I need a place to play tackle football with my 2 year old son, when he is bigger, like 16, I will play two hand touch.
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