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Tree ID?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Bacffin, Oct 4, 2012.

  1. Bacffin

    Bacffin Minister of Fire

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    O--My, You guys have been busy because of little ol' me!

    I scooted out of work early to split and get some close up's of this one (1 of a bunch coming), but you folks are way ahead of me. Wish I posted way back when I was lurking a year before joining. I thought I was getting to know a bunch of you, and you didn't know me, but I was so wrong! You all are just awesome....period. WoW, Thanks!

    I am going with maple (no idea what type) after splitting this. Attached are the close-ups with the bark dry split. Is Norway Maple hard or soft?
    I have another log I worked on today and will post that in another thread. (looks similar but bigger)

    I am amazed and humbled at the knowledge here..Thank you!

    My Regards,
    Bruce

    Attached Files:

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  2. Bacffin

    Bacffin Minister of Fire

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    Chain is old, but I sharpen often, just by eye in a vise.
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  3. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    That still looks like tulip for all the same reasons!
  4. JOHN BOY

    JOHN BOY Minister of Fire

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    Thats tulip poplar. ;)
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  5. Bacffin

    Bacffin Minister of Fire

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    Moisture content reads 28-29 on the meter. How fast does poplar season? I will hold it out of the main pile for a year to see if it seasons faster than the harder woods just to see.
  6. Bacffin

    Bacffin Minister of Fire

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    Any way I can help this debate? I will run some through the table saw and sand it smooth if it helps!
  7. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Pretty fast and just about the same btus as silver maple....18 per cord mim. wood.
  8. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

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    I still don't see Tulip. That just doesn't look right for Tulip to my eye, but I don't have a good idea what it is. I agree that green Tulip can seem heavy and dense.
  9. Wildo

    Wildo Feeling the Heat

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    a beautiful fast growing nice young white oak about 38.2152 years old by my eye. :p
  10. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Better save those pic's from the log all the way through and ever-one of them screams Tulip. Even the saw-dust screams tulip!
  11. PA. Woodsman

    PA. Woodsman Minister of Fire

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    Firstly thanks for posting such great pictures of the grain! Here's my take on it, for what it is worth: Are you sure that all the pieces of the splits are from the same tree-I'm sure they are but never hurts to ask. If it has a slight manure-like aroma to it I think it is some type of Hickory; if it has a bland "clean" aroma to it then it is some sort of Maple. I have had Hickory AND Maple that had that brown streak down the middle inside. Now please go smell them and tell us what it smells like lol!!

    Jay, I just don't see Poplar-I agree the bark sort of resembles it, but all the Poplar I've ever had has a more yellowish-striped tint to the grain-I just don't see that but I could be wrong....
  12. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    saw bbbbbbbbb.jpg saw bbbbbbbbb.jpg

    There are big diffrance's from poppy to tulip. There are alot of cabinets made using tulip and it is a hardwood (Indiana state tree.) Where you will see the color on the tulip is when the trunk is big enough and at that point it will look alot like ash. This tree is probally the second half of the log and the other half is at the mill! Here is a smaller piece of tulip! Strech marks..........;)
  13. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

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    The pics of split rounds look like Tulip to me. J has it right - Tulip and poplar are not the same thing. Why they call it Tulip Poplar I don't know, maybe because it grows tall and straight like the true poplars which are aspen, cottonwood, and related trees. Tulip Poplar aka Yellow Poplar is a decent hardwood in my opinion.
  14. PA. Woodsman

    PA. Woodsman Minister of Fire

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    Good pictures-but what about the insides? If you split a round from the wood on those sawbucks would it be smooth-white inside with a brown stripe through the middle like Bruce posted?
  15. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    There in the same family because they do grow quick and the newer growth looks some what like poppy, but the good wood is in the first 8-12 foot. My father has built over 50 pie safes with it and they look Awesome!
  16. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Yep! and saw dust to match.......;)
  17. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Not needed........But sounds like fun.
  18. scotvl

    scotvl Burning Hunk

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    I agree that its some kind of maple it looks like some Ive gotten in the past but i don't think its norway. I think there are supposed to be many varieties of maple not just your standard sugar, silver, red and norway. Norway maple is a hard maple closer to sugar than silver, and has a bark that looks similar to ash on straighter logs. the bark on what you have looks like it could be a young norway but the heartwood looks closer to silver.
    here's some picks of norway, the first one is some i got two months ago and the last two are of a 18 month old split, you can see how the grain and hardness are almost like sugar.

    20121006_105509.jpg 20121006_105727.jpg 20121006_105735.jpg 20121006_114852.jpg
  19. Brewmonster

    Brewmonster Burning Hunk

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    There in the same family because they do grow quick and the newer growth looks some what like poppy, but the good wood is in the first 8-12 foot. My father has built over 50 pie safes with it and they look Awesome!

    Sorry, tulip poplar is in the magnolia family; aspens and true poplars are in the willow family. It's the curse of common names again. I don't understand why we call Liriodendron tulipifera tulip poplar (or, even worse, yellow poplar). Maybe tulip tree would be better.
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  20. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    That is what we call it here to....lol
  21. PA. Woodsman

    PA. Woodsman Minister of Fire

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    Well I'm gonna "stir the pot" up again as this isn't sitting well with me; I just was right next door staring at my neighbor's Tulip Poplar and yes I KNOW that's what it is; then I stared at the bark on the rounds of Hickory I have in next years pile and again I know that's what it is and I can't believe that what is pictured is not Hickory...the bark on the Tulip next door has more deeper ridges in it, no size or part of that tree has the tight bark on it like the OP pictured, but the Hickory has supertight bark with those lines on it. And looking at the way that the grain has those little "strands" that you can grab and peel off are just like Hickory I've had in the past. Sorry guys and you may still prove me wrong but I still say that is Hickory.

    Original poster, again what does it smell like? Hickory has a faint almost manure-like smell. Better yet take a piece of it to someone local who knows firewood and ask them what it is. And I STILL see some variances from picture-to-picture; are you sure that this is all from the same tree?

    I wish I could get my hands on it and feel it and smell it as I'd know instantly what it is....:confused:
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  22. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    You should read through the post.......Yes tulip ant the trunk will have ridge much like ash. New growth has slick like bark with stretch marks. Lots of this comes down to cutting alot of it.......<>


    Newer growth tulip! second OP tulip!


    tulip.jpg

    Attached Files:

  23. PA. Woodsman

    PA. Woodsman Minister of Fire

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    I see what you are saying about the bark-can you or anyone else post a picture of the grain inside of Tulip so I can compare it to the OP's pictures? I'm sorry but I look at the grain inside and it looks like Hickory to me; in fact, it really doesn't look a heck of a lot different than the one that we know is Shagbark in his post "3rd tree ID-I think I got one". It has the same grain and the brown stripe down the center.

    Sorry J, not buttin' heads with ya but I guess I'll have to see a picture on the inside of Tulip before I give it up!
  24. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    lol no problem I have been on a saw since I was 12. Thats a long time....;) In no way in *ell can you throw great big white snow flakes from any other tree than a tulip. Now if that was hickory I could not throw chips like that on any hickory tree. Not even with a ported 880 with NOS and a 21 inch bar sporting a brand new old school rs!:cool: And a racing chain. Just saying. Now with the pics all says the same thing. Hickory does not get stretch marks from growing to fast.
  25. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    I've always heard it called tulip tree.

    A bird seeded one into my vegetable garden in Southern Ontario...really rare here. I haven't had the heart to cut it, and now I have a problem....a 40 foot high tree in my vegetable garden and no sun....

    Incidentally, I have read that tulip tree wood takes on different color depending on the minerals in the soil where it grows. If this is so, it may be yellowish for one person, totally different for another. The bark looks like my tulip tree, as do the leaves, i think...they aren't too clear to me, but if there are leaves there, there is no mistaking the tree. The leaves look like a childs drawing of tulip, hence its name. Tulip tree grows to 120 feet...a lot taller than other hardwoods.

    I'm worried about lightning in the future with mine, and will probably take it down...only probably, because I have a lot of trouble killing trees. It's not only taking my garden's sunlight, but it also is near my house...too close for comfort if and when it significantly outgrows my other trees and is a mast head. Other than the garden, the woods essentially come right to the house. To the south on the garden side I have one maple about ten feet from the house, but the woods proper are about 75 feet from the house (base of trunks).

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