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TSC LOG SPLITTER PROBLEMS

Post in 'The Gear' started by Jabbers, Oct 25, 2008.

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  1. Jabbers

    Jabbers Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    75
    Loc:
    NE OHIO
    I bought a log splitter from TSC last December. This fall I noticed that my hydro. pump seems to run at a low constant speed. The hydro pump is 2 stage but I have only seen one speed. Is there anything I can do to fix this or I've been thinking about getting a 22cc 2 stage pump.

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  2. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
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    15,969
    Loc:
    Anderson, Indiana
    I beleve the pump is adjustable
  3. triptester

    triptester Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2006
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    258
    Loc:
    S.E.Wisconsin
    If you are splitting wood that splits with little effort the pump may not need to downshift. If the pump is running in the high volume low pressure mode, high speed, it takes approx. 8 seconds to extend 24" with no load. In the high pressure low volume mode, low speed, it will take approx. 20 seconds to extend 24" with no load.
    If the pump stays in high volume low pressure mode the engine will stall if enough resistance is encountered.
    If it stays in low speed all the time the high volume relief is set to low or the spring is broke. The relief setting should be between 600 - 800 psi.
  4. Jabbers

    Jabbers Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    75
    Loc:
    NE OHIO
    I've used a 5hp two stage pump northern tool splitter for a month or so and it split fast. The log splitter I have is a 13hp 16gpm pump. The ram moves very slow. I could split wood faster with the 5hp with a two stage pump.
  5. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
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    6,737
    Loc:
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    A 5hp engine probably is driving a 20ton splitter, with a 4" piston, and an 11 gpm two stage pump. Your 13hp 16gpm pump is probably a 30 or 40 ton unit, with a 5" or larger cylinder. The way any splitter w/ a two stage pump works is it should be in high volume range until it hits about 800psi resistance, then it kicks down to low... Thats about 5.5 tons splitting pressure on a 4" piston, and 8 tons on a 5". This is more than enough on most rounds, so neither machine will kick into low range. When you hit a gnarly chunk both machines will kick into low volume high pressure range until the relief pops around 3,000psi - about 18.5 tons on a 4" piston, and 29.4 tons on a 5" - big difference in whether or not you stop in that really tough crotch...

    However, an 11gpm pump will move the 12.6 square inches of a 4" piston faster than a 16gpm pump can move the the 19.6 sq. inches of a 5" (or more if it's a 37 ton unit) piston, just plain laws of physics - the smaller cylinder can move faster... The speed difference isn't huge, but it is perceptible.

    Now if you put a 4.5" piston, on the 16gpm pump you'd get about the same speed but a max pressure of 24 tons, or with a 4" piston it would be really fast, but still only 18.5 tons max - The rule is that tonnage depends on piston size, speed is a function of the pump gpm, and engine hp doesn't matter a bit as long as it's enough to drive the pump... Alternatively, you could try putting on a bigger pump, but you may find that the engine isn't big enough to drive the next size bigger common pump (22gpm) when it kicks into low gear...

    As a diagnostic there are a few things to try...

    1. put a log crosways under the wedge and try to crush it - (caution, it may explode!) you should hear the engine load down when the wedge starts to dig in and the pressure goes up to kick into low range. If the wedge stops you should get some noise as the relief starts to let go.

    2. Invest in a hydraulic pressure guage (probably a 4-5000 PSI range is preferred) and see what pressure you get in the high pressure line as you use the splitter - normal unloaded piston travel should be well under a couple hundred pounds, rising as you make contact with a round, then dropping again as the round lets go... As you get into a gnarly bit, or if you do the serious loading test in #1 above, you should see the pressure go up till either the round gives way, or the relief pops at about 3,000psi. (note, some splitters will pop the relief much lower than this, which MAY be adjustable w/ caution depending on how much you trust the quality of the hydraulic components - never go over 3,000psi!!!)

    Gooserider
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