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Tulip tree

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by bsruther, Nov 11, 2008.

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  1. bsruther

    bsruther Minister of Fire

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    My friend has been telling me about the Tulip tree wood he has and how it burns readily in his fire pit when it's green.
    Well this morning he brough me a bundle of dry and a bundle of green splits to try out and compare.
    While this wood is considered a hardwood, I didn't expect it to be this solid.
    I'll try them out in the garage soon and see how they burn.

    Has anyone else had experience with this wood?
    What other wood would you compare it to?

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  2. deadon

    deadon New Member

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    The tulip tree gets its unofficial name from the shape of the leaf. It's true name is yellow poplar. It is the tallest hardwood and straightest truck in North America. It is most used for trim and furniture. Good burning wood and easy to split.
  3. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    "Tulip" Poplar is an interesting wood. My property in Virginia was littered with them. Some of them grow to be very large. Ask BrotherBart about burning it, I think he burns a fair amount. Perfectly good firewood, so far as I'm concerned. Sure don't miss those damnable little "helicopter" seed pods that get into everything including feet, though. I'm quite sure I'm still carrying a fair number of them around in the little crevices of my vehicles. Rick
  4. bsruther

    bsruther Minister of Fire

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    Actually it's not a poplar at all. It's in the magnolia family. The flowers are very nice too.
  5. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    There is some Tulip burning over in the Jotul in the office right now. Some was burned in the 30-NC upstairs this morning. I split most into small splits anymore and use it to get a coal bed going and the stove up to operating temp. Burns clean and a stack of six or seven little splits will give ya a hot stove and nice coal bed in nothing flat.

    Burn dry stuff though. Green it holds a bunch of moisture.
  6. dznam

    dznam Member

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    We've burned Tulip or Yellow Poplar for years. CT is at the Northern edge of its range and it grows well here in soil that's rich in organic matter. We've got a few trees out back that are approx. 5' feet in diameter about 4' up, ramrod straight and no branches for at least 30' - a majestic tree though they seem vulnerable to storm (ice, wind) damage. I believe it's the state tree of KY, and maybe Indiana. It's very wet with greenish heartwood when fresh cut and fades to white (to match the sapwood) and is very light when dry. We use it to get fires going here, too, as it's too light (low btu content) to give a long burn. Have about 1/2 cord in the rack.
  7. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    Took the words out of my mouth! :exclaim:
  8. caber

    caber New Member

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    I have a stove-full burning right now. It's our main wood for most of the year because it is so plentiful and everyone else around here is obsessed with using oak. They grow straight and fast, come down easy. It's very wet when first cut, but dries in an amazingly short amount of time. I would not burn it unseasoned. Does not last terribly long in a fire, tho.
  9. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1 Minister of Fire

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    My old friend Liriodendron Tulipifers - American Tulip Poplar. Burned about 6 cords of it the first year in this house with my Better'n Ben's. Only advice:

    Watch out for when it pops and shoots coals at you. Keep the door closed and keep an extra eye out when open.
  10. jpl1nh

    jpl1nh Minister of Fire

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    I believe someone has one in their yard here in Newfields, NH. We had lots of it in NJ where I grew up. Definately don't see them wild around here though. I always thought their flowers were kind of tulip like too. http://www.flickr.com/photos/93356259@N00/138416667/
  11. DavidV

    DavidV New Member

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    I usually turn it down when it is offered to me. I've even had some friends offer to bring it by already cut (they have to pay to take it to the dump.) But I don't like to burn it. for the space it takes up, with all the oak that is available I would rather just go with oak, hickory or cherry
    Maybe I shoulid be less particular
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