Turning a fence into a woodshed - my "green" woodsheld build

daveswoodhauler Posted By daveswoodhauler, Mar 23, 2013 at 4:19 PM

  1. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler
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    Ok, after years of dealing with tarps, etc....I am finally going to build my woodshed.
    Had originally built the fence to keep the kiddies somewhat in the backyard, but now they are 10, 8 and 5, so the fence is a comin down. (Always hated it especially when mowing)

    Have been thinking about this project for about a year now, and I am going to build as much of the woodshed as possible out of the remnants of the fence. I figure I have about 14 4X4's that are about 7 feet each, and 35-40 1 X 8's of cedar. This is going to be a kick arse shed.

    Some pics of this weeks progress, dismantle the fence and dig the footings. Actually got down about 30-32" for each one, so I was pretty pleased with that. (I figured my wife would have a fit if I left 6 open holes, so hence the planters and kids wagon to cover the holes)

    I'm in North Central Massachusetts, and hard to believe that we still have this much freakin snow this time of year.

    Will have to wait for the ground to thaw a bit so I can pull the 4 X 4's out of the soil, but I am on my way. (Checked a few last year, and no rot whatsoever)
     

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  2. PapaDave

    PapaDave
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    Surprised you were able to get those holes dug so early.
    Keep the pics comin'.==c
     
  3. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
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    I agree Dave. Still many of us who have frozen ground.

    Dave, you will love the wood shed but beware that it is still best to dry the wood in the open before putting it into the shed. Those who put green wood in the shed find it takes a lot longer for the wood to dry. The reason? Lack of air circulation. That is the reason we don't put wood in our barn until usually in October.
     
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  4. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler
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    Thanks for the info Dennis, but I should be all set. When I first joined the forum I read many of your posts, so the wood going into the shed will have been split/stacked grid method for almost 2 years before entering the shed. Basically, I have been dealing with a number of random stacks in the backyard, and after dealing with tarps/snow/rain, etc...its time to build the shed. The wood going into it will sit outside another 6 months or so before going in.....I'm planning around end of October/Early November.

    This will be a long process, but I'll post pics when I have some of the actual construction completed.
     
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  5. TimJ

    TimJ
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    You will make your plan happen.........it will be nice
     
  6. schlot

    schlot
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    Very cool. Looking at putting a shed up for the splitter and what not myself. Like you we have a lot of frost still. Up to 2' around here.
     
  7. Applesister

    Applesister
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    I think the fence in your back yard looks nice. I mull these things over myself. Understand what you mean about mowing and all the factors. It must be a female thing that I still can't decide. After all I've read here.
    I think my random piles of wood everywhere looks like crap. I hate black mold on the wood thats stacked out in the weather. I hate chasing tarps. I use scrap roofing aluminum and other things like pallets. And it all looks really wood chucky. But Dennis is right and I have photographic proof that sheds arent always the answer either. But there are 3 things Ive seen so far that have visual impact and are landscape wize very clean looking.
    1-Holtz Hausens
    2- corn cribs
    3- An octagonal shaped structure at a famous Adirondack camp. A massive structure working off the corn crib principle.

    The last one is a huge fantasy, however. I dont have 2 nickels to rub together.
    So lets see what you come up with, with your reclaimed fence posts.
     
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  8. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler
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    Update, and some pics to post hopefully within a day or so.
    Got the 6 footings dug and poured over easter weekend....depths in the front are only 22-26" or so due to a plethura of roots, but was able to get the back 3 down to 28-34" or so. Used 8" tubes, but only managed to get 5 out of the 6 poured as my wife informed me Easter Dinner was at noon vs 1:00 as originally planned, lol. (Must have not had my clairvoyant device turned on that day)
    Set 7" carriage bolts into the concrete, and then attached post ties to each footing. (I have a new found respect for builders as it was a majot PITA trying to get a.) the sona tubes level, and b.) the post ties square.
    Got all but one of the 4 x 4 posts out of the frozen ground, so it looks I will be ready to build soon.
     
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  9. bogydave

    bogydave
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    A step by step build. Sweet.
    Several woodsheds to be built this year.
    You'll wonder what took so long ;)
     
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  10. PapaDave

    PapaDave
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  11. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler
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    Ok Folks. Pics or it didn't happen, right?
    post1.jpg

    So I lined out each post using the old fashion string theory, lol. (was trying to use stuff I had on hand vs purchasing) Piers are basically 12' across and 6' front to back (Outside measurements) post2.jpg
    Still have one more pier to pour as I ran outt time on easter bunny day.


    post 4.jpg I had some scrap 2 X 6 and was having a difficult time lining up the center of each post attachment, so I made a temporary L on each corner to find the proper place to put each post and bracket. (They are somewhat adjustable, but wanted to get them close as possible)

    So, my plan is now have the woodshed portion of the shed to be 12 X 6, and then I am going to cantilever out a bit on each side storage of some garden tools, etc. (Roof will be 16 X 6, so I figure I'll have some overhand on each side.....still trying to work that piece out.)

    In theory, I will have (2) 6 x 6 sections and I am planning on using 2 X 6 pressure treated for the joists on the floor. I was able to get the posts aligned in that each 2 X 6 joist near the piers will also rest on top of the concrete pier for added support) Yall think that 2 X 6's are ok if they are 16" on center, os should I go up to 2 X 8's? (This is going to be 2 year seasoned wood, so the weight will not be that of geen)
     
  12. fishingpol

    fishingpol
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    Looking good Dave. I like that you are reusing material. I'll throw out a quick thought to lay some wire fence down to keep the woodchucks/skunks from digging and living under there. Don't ask me how I know.;sick I am looking forward to seeing it filled.
     
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  13. raybonz

    raybonz
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    Dave looks good! You can save alot if don't build a floor and weight of the wood will not be a problem if you place pallets on the ground. I have a 2"x6" floor on my shelter and had to support the span at 6' plus support the ends with heavy beams because joist hangers can't take the weight. My joist hangers literally were ripping out from the weight of all the oak! I happened to have some 8"x8" PT beams kicking around and saved the day! If I were to build a shelter again I would keep the floor separate from the structure for this reason and save money in the process..

    Ray
     
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  14. TimJ

    TimJ
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    That shed it going to be sturdy and beefy too ==c
     
  15. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler
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    Thanks for the info Ray. I was thinking about no having a floor. and just going with the pallet method, but its a big slope from front too back. (Pics don't really do it justice) And also this is going to be within "eyesight" so its going to have to look "pretty" if you know what I mean. When all is said and done I am going to have some 4 X 4's left over, so if I need some extra support I can use those and maybe dig another footing or 2 as I have some sona tubes left over that are about 18-24 inches. Although this is going to be a woodshed, I am going to have a portion of it or garden tools and stuff, so I need to make it "purdy" for my significant other, lol.

    Hope to be building this week after work, gotta charge up the headlight...3 kids and no time. :)
     
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  16. raybonz

    raybonz
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    Yup sounds good just over build the floor it is worth doing..

    Ray
     
  17. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler
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    Ok, working on sketching out the slope of the roof. the front post to back post will be 6 feet, with a 1' overhang on the front and back. (So roof will be 8 feet deep)

    I was originally going to have the front post at 7'8", and then have the rear post at 6'8"...but in sketching out the pitch does not look great enough?? (Only a 1 foot drop over a 6 foot span)

    Here is a diagram....each X is a 4 X 4 post, and I'll be using 2 X 6 joists 16" on center for the roof...determinted that 2 X8's or 2 X 10's would be overkill as I have added the interior 4 X 4 posts to lessen the load. (Also, if you are wondering why I am using so many 4 X 4's is because I have them left over for the fence, and in this set up I can use each 4 X 4 as a brace to hold up the stacks :)

    Also, the lines you see on the digram are actually the floor joists that will be 2 X 6's at 12" on center. I don't want a sever pitched roof, but would like it able to handle the snow load up here. Thoughts on the pitch I should go with? shed diag.jpg
     
  18. gzecc

    gzecc
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    To make it unattractive to vermin under it, put a load of QP (quarry process) stone under it a few inches thick.
     
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  19. milleo

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    5-12 pitch should be good for Mass.
     
  20. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler
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    Attached Files:

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  21. DexterDay

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    I took a dog kennel and turned it into a wood shed with my old wood from a horse fence.

    Took an area that looked like this (without the 2 racks) and added 8 racks then sided shed/kennel

    Repurposing wood or any item helps keep the memory around. IMO

    image.jpg image.jpg
     
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  22. Ashful

    Ashful
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    Most of my wood gets re-purposed into kindling. I just re-purposed two wood racks last week!
     
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  23. Berner

    Berner
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    I like the looks of those racks! Especially the top cover. What kind of cover is that? Also did you use pressure treated wood for those racks or just regular old 2X4's? Cheers!
     
  24. Ashful

    Ashful
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    I think you meant to quote Dexter Day, not me!
     
  25. albert1029

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    some of my favorite racks...
     

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