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Two simple questions from novice!

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by abracadabra, Feb 12, 2013.

  1. abracadabra

    abracadabra New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2012
    Messages:
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    Okay folks, there's two things I'm wondering about and I've done some searching but don't have a real answer in my head.

    First: I've got an old Warner stove with baffle plate, it keeps the flames from hitting the stove top but when things are really going I notice the flames really are drawn forward and up/back towards the stove pipe outlet. It got me thinking, for stoves with no baffle plate, is the outlet for the stove pipe located in the firebox with the fire? And if so, one would have flames licking up the stove pipe when there's a roaring fire going? Seems like a good way to keep your stove pipe clean but also a good way to start a chimney fire if you have some creosote built up.

    Second: Flue pipe dampers, I've got one right at the outlet of the stove on my pipe, I don't mess with it much. But as I've been thinking about the baffle plate, and how its designed to keep the exhaust gasses in longer for more burn time, I was wondering if you use the flue damper does it do a similar thing by allowing the gasses to spend more time in the stove? Also, can using a flue damper lead to creosote by slowing its release in to the flue?

    I do appreciate the help, thanks!

    mark

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  2. HaTaX

    HaTaX New Member

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    Jan 19, 2013
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    Minnesota
    On the really old stoves, there's sometimes no baffle plate above the fire and you end up with exactly what you described, large flames sometimes going up the flue itself. And yes, it can get much more dangerous if you're not keeping that lower pipe nice and clean with good hot burns and dry wood. The heat from the fire isn't going to damage those sections of pipe, but it's just an area you need to pay more attention to if you have a stove without a baffle. Most of those make a good amount of creosote anyway, so you wouldn't be able to go too long without it getting your attention anyway. ;)

    Dampers are basically a secondary way to control air flow out of the firebox, and in turn the air that comes into it. Closing it up too much has the same effect of restricting air flow too much, creosote build up. Here's a nice guide on flue dampers and how best to use them: http://www.navitron.org.uk/page.php?id=116&catId=85
  3. WeldrDave

    WeldrDave Feeling the Heat

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    Nov 14, 2012
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    Loc:
    New Jersey
    Hello Mark, I can't speak for any other stove because I have and had only Fishers, but some of the older fishers did not have a baffle plate installed in them, the stove pipe temps would get up there quick but with that said, my cleaning was always minimal build up, and I cleaned it "every" year because of fear of chimney fire.

    I just installed a baffle plate in a Baby bear i restored, It did not have one. As per instruction from the forums here it's best to have one. it makes the stove much more efficient and can keep temps more even in the stove. We had a Grandpa Fisher many years ago that had no baffle, and once in a while about a foot of the pipe above the stove would start getting red, I wasn't comfortable with that._g as far as a damper, I never had one installed because you adjust the air flow by "damper assembly knobs" on the front of the stove and it wasn't required. "If I got that wrong, Coaly will let me know" ;em:)....

    If Coaly is around, He may help you out more but one thing I can say, don't burn wet or pines. I have only burned good, dry mixed hard woods and have never had any trouble with my chimney. look around the site, go to the wood shed and pick there knowledge, lot's of good info over there.

    Dave
  4. abracadabra

    abracadabra New Member

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    Apr 9, 2012
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    Thanks for the info folks, sure helps!
  5. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    The baffle plate extends the flame path for more complete combustion. If air is introduced at the turnaround even more complete combustion can occur. I think if you use the flue damper to reduce draft once the fire is burning vigorously you will see increased stove top temps and reduced flue temps. That is a good thing as Martha would say. Creosote accumulation should not be a big issue as long as the wood is well seasoned and the air is not shut down to the point where the fire smolders. Check your chimney outside for smoke as a guide. Try for no smoke and you should do ok.
    WeldrDave likes this.

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