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unseasoned ash wood

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by nwctjeff, Oct 8, 2008.

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  1. nwctjeff

    nwctjeff Member

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    I have started burning the new insert earlier than expected, but love it so far. I have 4 cords of well seasoned and dry mixed hardwoods and hope this would last the season. I have always heard in the past that ash wood may be burned as soon as it is cut down without creosote conerns, but have never had to try this in the fireplace. Can anyone tell me if unseasoned ash can be burned in a new (epa) insert effectively? Hopefully I do not have to find out.

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  2. ikessky

    ikessky Minister of Fire

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    The old timers in my area always say the same thing about white ash. They cut it, split it, burn it. Black ash is a different story. I recently cut up a huge white ash that has been laying for a few months. It is still pretty green, so I think I'll leave it in the back of the piles and maybe throw a few pieces in with some already seasoned hardwood.
  3. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    It's dryer to start, and dries faster than other premium hardwoods. I would split it, stack it, and let it sit until the end of the season if it's needed.

    get started on next year's wood now if you can!
  4. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Nope, it will make you sterile and can cause blindness. It should be treated similar in nature to medical grade radiation. Send it to me and I will properly dispose of it (by burning it in my EPA Cert. stove)
  5. nwctjeff

    nwctjeff Member

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    Jags, thanks for the offer. Nice to know people are watching out for us newbies.

    I assume from the responses that it can be burned unseasoned without as much smoldering, hissing, smoking, and low heat output as other marginally seasoned wood that seem to cause issues in the new stoves and inserts
  6. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Thats just the nice kinda guy I am.
  7. ansehnlich1

    ansehnlich1 Minister of Fire

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    I've read all the conventional wisdom regarding white ash. I'll tell you my experience, 'cuz I got a lot of it split and stacked. I cut the trees down for a neighbor well over a year ago. The stuff did NOT burn well last year. After seasoning for almost 2 years now, I gotta say, the several splits I've burned thus far this season have burned wayyyyyy better than I ever imagined.

    I'm leaning toward letting all my wood season at least 18 months prior to burning, unless it is boxelder, pine, sycamore, or such lightweight stuff.
  8. ikessky

    ikessky Minister of Fire

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    You sure it was white ash and not black ash?
  9. DiscoInferno

    DiscoInferno Minister of Fire

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    The various firewood tables I've collected give the green moisture content of white ash as somewhere between 35-45%. That's better than a lot of wood, but not really near the 20% generally considered optimal for burning.
  10. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    nwctjeff I've been burning ash forever and wouldn't recommend burning green anything in a stove...unless it's a matter of survival.
  11. nwctjeff

    nwctjeff Member

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    Thanks for the input everyone. I don't plan on burning any "green" wood. I was mainly wondering how true the info was about ash.
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