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use "glass" products in a direct vent fireplace?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by robertengels, Dec 20, 2005.

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  1. robertengels

    robertengels New Member

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    I have a direct vent dual-view fireplace by FMI. I am not really happy with the "realism" of the fire or the logs.

    Can I possibly replace the log set with a "fire on ice" type product like is at http://moderustic.com/

    I figure it will then be completely artifical and more "artistic" - avoiding the "realism" factor altogether.

    The fireplace is rated from 23,300 to 35,000 btu/hr. Is this too little for a product like this? Too much?

    Since they "burn" nearly 100% clean, pollution doesn't seem to be a factor?

    Any one have any experience with this?

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  2. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    In looking at the site, I'd think a pilot light would cause soot problems.
  3. robertengels

    robertengels New Member

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    Is it because some of the glass would always be burning? It seems to me that the glass (at least theirs) does not actually burn (if it did it would look like the "bad" glass products they indentify), but just acts as a way to divert the flames.

    Unless you mean, that the glass would cause the gas to not burn cleanly enough, causing soot. But my understanding that with direct vent fireplaces this is kind of how they get the "yellow" flame anyway (rather than the blue).

    I really don't know much about it. I appreciate your help.
  4. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    They claimed that the reason that other glass products soot up and look bad is that the flame is actually partially below the product, and somehow theirs causes the flame to be above the glass rather than within or below. So, my thought on the pilot light is that it's guaranteed to be below the glass, thus the possibility of the soot thing.

    This was my own conclusion and has no basis in experience, just thinking about it. Maybe just a question to ask them.
  5. Shane

    Shane Minister of Fire

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    If it's a gas fireplace then no you can't put the glass burner in. Well I won't say can't because when there is a will there is a way but it would be dangerous. If you wan the glass set up I'd buy a cheap builder fireplace and install them. They won't be efficient as a heater because there is no heat transfer efficiency but they'll certainly look "artistic".
  6. robertengels

    robertengels New Member

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    Did you look at the site? It doesn't "burn" glass. It is a gas fireplace - the gas burns above the glass.

    These "glass" fireplaces are gas (NG or LP), they just don't seem CLAIM to work in a direct vent scenario (but I assume they would work in a B-VENT.

    I am trying to use it in a direct vent configuration because I need the "heater".

    I would assume that if I keep the same burners, the btu would be the same, so what might make the configuration dangerous.
  7. Shane

    Shane Minister of Fire

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    YEs I looked at the website. Yes I looked at teh product at the trade show a few years back. I didn't intend ot imply that they were physically burning glass, that would be idiotic. The reason it would be dangerous is because when you go and retrofit your gas fireplace you are going to be altering manufacturers design. YOu cannont simply install this new burner system and expect it to work. Go ahead and do it if you want, it won't work properly and when you burn your house down your insurance company will probably tell you to kick your glass rocks.
  8. robertengels

    robertengels New Member

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    Sorry, I didn't mean to offend you. I was just asking for some help.

    I wasn't planning on chaging the burner system, just using the one already in the fireplace.

    I guess this just isn't a good idea.

    Thanks for your help.
  9. Shane

    Shane Minister of Fire

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    I apologize my reply was uncalled for. The best way to explain the product your looking at is that its a set of "gas logs" typically meant for installation into a wood fireplace. If you need heat then i'd suggest looking at a few different brands of dv fireplaces there are some more realistic flame patterns out there. Again I apologize for being so snippy it wasn't very nice.
  10. robertengels

    robertengels New Member

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    Just curious, why couldn't you use a set of gas longs meant for a b-vent or open fireplace in a driect vent (sealed), as long as the btu were similar?

    Other than manufactorer doesn't allow (I know that). I mean technically?
  11. Shane

    Shane Minister of Fire

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    Typically you're going to run into flame impingment issues. When the manufacturer creates a fireplace they do so with a specific burner and a specific log set. Flame impingment causes major sooting and releases carbon monoxide. In a DV unit you don't have to worry about CO poisoning as much because the unit is sealed. However flame impingment will dramatically affect heat transfer efficiency as well so you won't be getting as much heat out of the unit. Hope this helps.
  12. robertengels

    robertengels New Member

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    One more question, if that is the case, shouldn't I be able to replace both the burner and log set (again looking at the btu requirements), and have the system work? I understandard why the burner and log set need to match (otherwise the flames would be going directly into the logs).

    It is just that the logs look very crappy, and there are a lot of gaps.

    If I can't change the logs. Is there any material I can use the fill the gaps - maybe the glowing ember stuff? Can't this stuff be painted?

    Thanks again for your help.
  13. Shane

    Shane Minister of Fire

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    The burners will be two completely different systems, I doubt whether you would be able to get everything installed properly. But yes if everything were to line up perfectly etc. etc. then it would in theory work. There's just a lot of what if's and maybe's involved in doing such a thing. Can you take a picture of what you want to paint and the gaps you want to fill that would help me so that I don't give you bad advice.
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