vermont castings resolute - blower?

Jason Schatz Posted By Jason Schatz, Dec 30, 2012 at 12:51 PM

  1. Jason Schatz

    Jason Schatz
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 30, 2012
    7
    0
    Loc:
    SE PA
    Hi All,

    Just got into the wood burning lifestyle this year with our new (1800s) farmhouse. We installed a Harmon TL300 in our living room and I am enjoying learning about it.

    The home, however, came with a vermont castings resolute wood burner in the kitchen. I am getting a good fire with it, however it is installed in an old fireplace opening so I am looking for some way to get the heat out --- do they make a blower for this set-up? From what I have researched it seems this stove is from the mid 1980s? There seems to be a metal plate on the bottom that looks as if it would be used to draw cold air in, but nothing else on the stove looks conducive to a blower.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. begreen

    begreen
    Mooderator 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    61,826
    7,902
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
  3. Jason Schatz

    Jason Schatz
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 30, 2012
    7
    0
    Loc:
    SE PA
    thanks - the old damper on the fireplace is closed tightly and stuffed with insulation -- while i think i could probably do a better job i don't think that is the main issue. is there any type of generic fan option i could employ?
     
  4. Oldhippie

    Oldhippie
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 18, 2011
    570
    259
    Some guys use small computer "muffin" fans. The are about 3.5 inches square, low cost and fairly quiet. You can point it at the stove and push cold air at the stove and push the heat out.

    Also, do you have a flue damper on that stove? I have an Acclaim Resolute (might be a newer model than yours) and it benefits from flue damper which I notice once the stove reaches about 600'F on the griddle, the flue pipe also had a high temp.. then I engage the flue damper and it helps keep the heat in. The temp drops on the flue but stays hot longer on the stove. Saves on wood too.
     
  5. Jason Schatz

    Jason Schatz
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 30, 2012
    7
    0
    Loc:
    SE PA
    i do have a flue damper -- it works well when the fire gets hot I close it down and I get much longer burn times.

    thanks for the advice, I guess I will just have to experiment with external fans
     
  6. begreen

    begreen
    Mooderator 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    61,826
    7,902
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    If there is a large cavity above the stove in which the heat can collect, that can be an issue. The masonry will soak up the heat like a sponge.
     
    Oldhippie likes this.

Share This Page