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Vogelzang All cast iron box wood stove. Worth it?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by saladdin, Jan 12, 2012.

  1. saladdin

    saladdin Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
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    West Tennessee
    I can buy this for $125, new (place going out of business) but I have no idea if it's worth it. This is my first year of burning pellets and looking for a second stove that is pure wood (not needing electricity). House is 1400 sqt feet with chimney that is not being used.

    This would be backup or for a shop later on.

    Anyone familiar with this guy?


    http://www.vogelzang.com/browse.cfm/standard-boxwood-stove/4,13.html

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  2. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    Oh man.
  3. arborealbuffoon

    arborealbuffoon New Member

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    Southeast Iowa
    Most members on here will tell you to take that stove directly to the scrap yard. (And, they actually DO have a point there)

    If you're trolling, I apologize for feeding you. Just sayin'.......
  4. certified106

    certified106 Minister of Fire

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    Here let me sum it up for you......No :)
  5. dougand3

    dougand3 Minister of Fire

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    Run away, Run away, Run away and save your life. Sorry, Real McCoys never left my brain. That thing is in constant overfire. Clearances are 36" but 36 feet would be more safe. I bought one for $89 once at Harbor Freight. After unpacking, I said no way am I gonna fire this in a structure I care about.
  6. saladdin

    saladdin Feeling the Heat

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    West Tennessee
    Thanks guys. That was quick and helpful. I should have done a better job searching, my apologizes.
  7. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Not EPA certified. Burns hot, fast, and dirty. Not likely that it's very well made. Some folks report having had problems controlling the burn. Requires large clearances from combustibles all the way around (36")...that's a pretty big chunk of real estate to give up. Trust me, unless you find a deal on a nice used EPA-certified stove on Craigslist or somewhere, you're not going to find anything that I would have in my house or my shop for under the ~$500 range. Then comes the flue system, hearth, and other incidental costs. Others will chime in, I'm sure...this stove pops up here ever now and then. I looked at one on the floor of my local Lowes a few years back, and I just kinda shook my head and walked away. I could tell it was nothing I wanted to build a fire in inside any structure I owned. Rick
  8. bluedogz

    bluedogz Minister of Fire

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    Search around here for "Vogelzang" and see what you come up with. Take all the positive reviews to heart.
  9. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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  10. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    I had a vogelzang Durango EPA stove and it almost burned down the house with a run away coal bed! In short the wind picked up outside and the coals super heated next thing I know I can't stop the stove. I ended up covering the secondary air after shutting the main air turns out this is more common than you think from what I have researched. The difference in my vogelzang and a better stove is the cheap air control it is totally useless and dangerious. Stay clear of vogelzang !

    Pete
  11. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

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    Averill Park, NY, on Burden Lake II...
    The ONLY place I'd burn one of those is in my yard.
    A friend asked me to install one for him in his basement
    a couple of years ago, & I refused. He asked "Why won't
    you? You're NFI Certified! I told him "Yes, I am, & that's why
    I won't!"
  12. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

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    I have a Vogelzang Performer thats just fine. Many dont like vogelzang as its made over seas. I had to go thru a learning curve just like everyone else. But the stove works great but the operator sometimes needs some help. But I have gotten pretty good at it.

    But the main point is most on here isnt going to advise you buy those oldtimer stoves. Even tho old timers used those stoves for years, its just that you need to know how to operate them or even these newer type High efficiency stove.

    One guy on another website tried to tell me a century fw2700 stove was better as since the vogelzang was shipped in it was made of thin metal to save on shipping cost and that if you looked at the weight of the stove that the Vogelzang Performer was much lighter stove than the equivalent century fw2700. What was so funny was I went and looked and the Vogelzang was made of 3/16 steel just like the century stove and the vogelzang was actually heavier in weight not lighter.

    I got my Vogelzang for $699 at my local Menards $200 off , I guess I did buy it off an American company Menards which employs my brother in-law who works nights there after his day job to help pay for his son to go to college.
  13. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks for that info, dog...like I said above, we don't hear much from the folks out there who are burning the Vogelzang EPA stoves. Of course, that line of Vogelzangs is a whole different animal from the little boxwood the OP was asking about. Rick
  14. Stump_Branch

    Stump_Branch Minister of Fire

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    MD
    The boxwood of theirs is more of a gimic than an actual appliance. I had an epa insert of theirs, while it did okay, it was small for my needs. They are priced low for a reason. but it kept the room warm so long as i fed it short bits of wood all the time.

    In short i sold it and am glad i havent looked back.
  15. jrcurto

    jrcurto Member

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    I HAVE the Vogelzang Pot Belly stove, installed in my garage with an oval double wall stovepipe through thimble to double wall chimney. All of this takes place in a slab/cinderblock/masonry setting and even then its more for an experiment on draft. That stove thang runs on wood and coal and can heat my garage to 90 deg in no time. But In No Time would I want it in my house. You hear of cherry red cast iron?... Combine it with crappy non certified construction. The Pot Belly is going to be moved indoors as furniture and I am going to start playing with a used pellet stove in the garage next. At least i wont have to worry abouty Chernobyl II when Im not watching.
  16. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    In all fairness, many don't like vogelzang because of their history of making non-epa stoves with ill fitting parts and very poor control of the stove. It appears that Vogelzang is trying to climb out of that pit with some of their newer offerings and epa certifications (on some stoves), but they have a long haul to correct their well earned reputation.

    Its the Yugo of wood stoves.
  17. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    Perfect.
    I think it was a Yugo that blew over the side of the Mackinac Bridge
  18. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

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    Made in china ,and it should stay there. I actually bought onr of these years ago from harbor freight(before i knew what a real wood stove was) I made them pay the freight to ship it back as the instructions clearly stated it was not for use in any structure resembling a house.
  19. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    Though I will never ever buy another vogelzang anything I have to admit the air control looks far better on the performer than what my Durango had on it. It looks like a viable stove and a real effort to improve kudos vogelzang.
    Pete
  20. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

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    The Apple iPhone is made in China...I don't think that alone proves anything.
  21. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for the replies Pete and Dan.
  22. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

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    The stove in question is that thin leaky pot belly replica they sell,which is a hazard. That said im equally sure they can make a quality stove as well.
  23. Bub381

    Bub381 Minister of Fire

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    Another thing on these stoves is i have seen them used here on the coast for years.They want fast heat in those old shops where they build their traps and being cheap they burnt everything in them you could get in it.They threw heat fast and if it got out of hand you could throw anything wet or damp in it.They were a dime a dozen.Have you ever looked at the top of this stove and counted the places you could see into it.Next time you look at 1 throw a flashlight in it and stand back and just look and laugh.Now try controlling that air intake.When these stoves get old i have seen the side panels fall open or partially off.You just can't judge when it will happen.They were severly abused and it was damp alot where they were kept but i still am not impressed with them.
  24. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    Yes it was as a matter of fact lol
  25. Kosmik

    Kosmik Member

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    Just installed a Vogelzang Durango in a leaky house @ 7,200 ft in Central Colorado. House is 2 story approx 1,300 ft^2. Substandard attic insulation, R-30 at best, cellulose probably R-30 when they blew it in 30 years ago. Windows doublepane, but leak like a sieve. Mostly open floor plan with 2 bedrooms upstairs, close off upstairs beds when not in use.
    First time heating with wood, last season was an old Quadrafire P1000 (last manufactured in '97 I saw), with a gap where stovepipe meets collar (created extra draft). Fixed that, and sealed two attic hatches and 2 out of 10 windows...Still got more house leaks to fix.

    Got it installed after the Artic Splurge over New Years, so have yet to test it in extreme cold (been sunny and 50/20 to 30/0 here {day/night}).
    My biggest take so far is the difference in radiant heat versus the air to air of the pellet stove.
    In a leaky house, that constant heat is the winner. I'm sure a good pellet stove in a tight/insulated house is awesome, I can imagine, but old leaky sub standard insulation house, this thing has been sweet. Got the house up to 80 a few times.

    About the stove: (besides the fact I need to get a proper set of tools, which would help with some of the below) (also my inexperience could be aiding this)
    1) Front to back burner, so if you don't have a ditch through the coals, it is somewhat hard to get a full burn of the box without a lot of coal raking.
    2) If you don't load full the 2.2 ft^2 box then you have a hard time maintianing the high temps in the box for the secondary combustion (has a tendency to want to fade away when not being kept hot)
    3) Important to load the sucker full of kindling, not just a little stack, when starting a cold one. Must have at least 60 pounds of firebrick in it. Takes a moment to get hot and pull that stuff out the flue, instead of the door when opening.
    4) Gotta choose you carefully when and how you open the door. If you need to open it all the way to load, then you need to open the choke for a few minutes, slightly open the door, rake the coals, let that flare up and burn, then you can open the door all the way without filling you house with smoke.
    5) Ash buildup seems to affect the reflection of heat in the box for secondary burn, in addition to the slowing of oxygen through the coal bed, so running again in the morning without cleaning first is a little more difficult. (working on a hot ash vac design [all steel], so I can attend it better in the middle of February)
    6) Bit of a balancing act between choking the air supply to reduce flue uptake and maintaining secondary burn. When have a good bed of coals, and a full load, chokes down all the way with a firebox full of flame and pumping out the heat.
    7) Fan is a little 'loud', but for me it is more a little too high pitched and not that 'loud'. And you don't always want the fan running at full, if the stove isn't that hot.
    8) Fan is insufficient for moving all that heat and only moves from back of stove, not the large sides. Therefore need ceiling fan in room to push it around.

    With that being said, from a cold start I pile in the kindling, choke open (sometimes open the door a crack for a minute or two to help startup), then door must be closed to circulate the gases for secondary combustion, usually starts 1/3 to 1/2 way through kindling burn, then when they burn down enough to make some coals and not flare up when I open the door, I load it up with my smaller wood, after that burns down there is usually enough coals and the bed hot enough, to put in the big ckunks. And when it's hot and choked down, get a good hour or two of heat without much/any tending.
    Puts out smoke like a normal stove until gets hot, then when secondary combustion is hitting, nice a clean.

    So a little overkill during more temperate weather, but I have a feeling I'll be good and toasty for the next Artic Vomit. Happy with the purchase, worth the $920 delivered.

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