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Vogelzang Boxwood wood stove

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by MikeThePipe, Dec 14, 2011.

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  1. MikeThePipe

    MikeThePipe New Member

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    I just bought one of these small boxwood stoves (super deal) as an introduction to wood stoves. I cannot justify spending $1500 on a stove and another $1000 on installation so I decided to spend three months with this to figure out what I really want (or do not want!) I am going to plumb this into an existing brick chimney by simply running stove pipe up the chimney and plugging the chimney around the stove pipe to preven smoke coming down, or heat going up.

    The reviews online do not mention that the "lid" or top plate to this thing has 6" x 10" HOLE in it filled with some badly cast round "removable plates" and a third piece between them to complete the fill. The problem is there are 1/4 inch gaps!!!!

    So given that we are making a FIRE in this thing, and they have been selling it since the early 70's, I am just stumped by the "design".

    I called them and they tell me that these removable plates are for puttin pots on (notice I said ON not IN). Yes they actually think that a pot will then make the seal of this firebox because "the smoke will go up the chimney". Really. Why not just put the put ON the toplate? Given there is a FIRE undreneath it it should be hot enough to cook the living heck out of anything....

    So, please someone, enlighten me. What were they thinking?

    I want to engineer this a litle better, becuase it is obviously going to smoke the house out in anything less than strong draw, so I am considering making a steel top plate WITHOUT any holes and sealing with stove cement, or perhaps using a thin sheet of steel and formin it into shape so it is held in place by the existing "top plate" or perhaps just sealing the existing top plate with stove cement. Is there fireproof "rope" that I could use to seal or anything like that?

    If I can seal the top, I believe this thing will be workable and I will get the experience I need with a wood stove.

    Any other ideas for THIS stove?

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  2. Dakotas Dad

    Dakotas Dad Minister of Fire

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    I am not much on getting a puppy to see if I should have kids...

    One thing to note is that, if they have been making and selling the same design since the 70's, whether you think it's a good design or not, it must work well enough. A 40 year run for any product speaks volumes about it.

    I am not sure I understand your install plans, but if I do, you are doing it wrong. If you are actually worried about the fact that you are going to have a FIRE inside your home, then instal it by the book.
  3. Iembalm4aLiving

    Iembalm4aLiving Feeling the Heat

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    I wouldn't mess with it. Looks like an ancient design that seems to work, and the reviews on Northerntool.com seem to back it up. For the money, you can't go wrong, I suppose.
  4. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    Plugging the chimney around the stove pipe?

    With what? How? Where?

    I'm not sure I'm deciphering you right here, but what I'm interpreting could be a very bad idea.
  5. ansehnlich1

    ansehnlich1 Minister of Fire

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    Do a search on this site regarding the Vogelzang boxwood stove.

    I'll be right up front, we are talking fire here. There is no price too much to pay when burning a wood stove to ensure the safety of my family, my self, and my home.

    Simply put, the stove you have purchased has a reputation for being difficult to control, for being dangerous, for being cheaply produced, and for being easily overfired.

    One place I will not skimp is in the installation of a woodburning stove in my home.
  6. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Personally, I wouldn't have one in my house. Or my shop. Or anywhere else. But that's (of course) up to you. Your installation plan has some flaws...at least if you care about codes/safety/performance. If you look in the documentation for the stove, you'll likely find that it requires 36" clearance from combustibles on all sides, and who knows what for floor protection underneath (a bunch, I figure), extending out 18" all around. Piping the thing into an existing masonry chimney requires an approved thimble, and then stainless steel piping from there up, if you choose to pipe it. If not, you need to be concerned about the size (cross-sectional area) differential between the stove's flue collar and the chimney into which you're directing the exhaust. There are a whole lot of important safety and performance related things involved here. I'd strongly recommend that you do a whole lot of research/learning before you proceed with this installation. Rick
  7. Trktrd

    Trktrd Feeling the Heat

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    Been there, done that. UNSAFE CREOSOTE MAKING MACHINE!! Chuck that thing out in the yard and make a planter out of it and get a good stove.
  8. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    It is a cheap non airtight stove, with an obsolete design and inapropriate wood consumption as well as dirty burning.

    You get what you pay for. Almost any other stove you could get would be better. See if you can get your money back.

    Then come cack here, with some details about the house you want to heat, and we will help you find an affordable stove that will suit your needs.

    Just so you know, the stove will not smoke the house out unless there is "no" draw. The old non-airtight stoves do work, but they waste wood and are hard to controll.
  9. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    A team of wild horses couldn't drag that stove into my house.. I think you should reconsider and buy a decent used EPA stove or look at a new Englander EPA stove and you'll be happy you did..

    Good luck!

    Ray
  10. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    We recently had a new poster on this forum who came extremely close to burning his house down with one of these stoves! Remember, you are playing with fire. Stoves can be very safe but they are not a good place to try to save dollars. Would you buy a cheap furnace to heat your home? Is it worth taking a chance? Perhaps this is a good stove but we've heard too many bad things about them.

    And if you want to use this as an experiment to see if you want to burn wood, then why not spend more dollars to get a better experiment? You will have to put dollars into the chimney either way.

    If you want to experiment, what have you done so far about the fuel you plan on burning? Do you know wood needs to be dried outdoors for at least a year.....after it has been split?
  11. wkpoor

    wkpoor Minister of Fire

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    Might have been better off getting a used good condition old pre epa stove. At least it would be safe.
  12. Loco Gringo

    Loco Gringo Feeling the Heat

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    This thread so reminded me of this video. Funny as hell but really relates to the issue itself.
  13. wkpoor

    wkpoor Minister of Fire

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    No thats funny for all you Yankee Retards (his words not mine)hehehehehe.
  14. Gary_602z

    Gary_602z Minister of Fire

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    By the way Welcome to our Merry crowd here. But seriously really listen to these guys and do NOT feel like they are putting you down. They will do the best to keep you warm AND safe, and it is evident by their post totals that they know what they are talking about!

    Gary
  15. Iembalm4aLiving

    Iembalm4aLiving Feeling the Heat

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    Oh good Lord....after watching that video I'd like to rescind my earlier statement that you can't go wrong for that kind of money.

    That thing is downright scary!
  16. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Don't let the children chew on this, it may have asbestos in it. Uh, ok, I'll keep the kids from chewing on the 500 degree stove. Yep, think I can handle that.
  17. MikeThePipe

    MikeThePipe New Member

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    heh heh, oh dear i have lit a fire here havnt I.
    OK first to all the "by the book" guys, I never have and never wull do ANYTHING by the friggin book. The first thing to get burned is other peoples ideas of what is correct. I am an engineer and I re-engineer everything...better. I just do.
    Next the "burn ya hous to the ground" guys, yaaaaawn, I am not a moroon. I will be here all the time. Yes I have played with fire before, yes I know its dangerous, and yes there is a MASONRY fireplace extending 200 ft from the foreplace. So relax
    Next the cheap POS comments. Yes i know it's cheap and nasty and made in China. yes I can and will return it three months from now
    >then why not spend more dollars to get a better experiment?
    Well cos its more dollars!
    Decent Stove Minimum $1200
    "BTB installation $1500
    Wood $200
    its my first wood stove guys come on. I'm not dropping $3k to figure this out sheesh. I ll probably just weld one up myself once I figure out what I really want.

    So, back to the task at hand. I have a fireplace. I have a POS Wood stove. Insert wood stove into fireplace. Run stove pipe up chimney. Done.

    Will it work? Yes. Is it great? no.... but its rental house and when I buy aplace I will buy and install a decnet wood stove IF i get into it.

    I had the chinmey swept last week to make sure it was good. it is. I tell the guy what I am thinking of doing and HE suggested the plan I just outlined so i know it isnt that bad.

    I will stuff insulation material (without the combustible lining) up and down the chimney to "seal it". He also thought that was a WORKABLE idea (not BTFB or great, just workable)

    So in all you answers, not one person decided to answert the actual quaestion, whats the best way to seal the top of this stove?
  18. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Put furnace cement around the edge of where the hot plates go and then set them in. Wait a while and start a small fire to cure the cement.

    It is a dangerous stove but you are gonna do it anyway. Folks tried.

    Cya.
  19. MikeThePipe

    MikeThePipe New Member

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    Thanks.
    Life is dangerous and I can choke the fire at the damper and by blocking air intake so I am really not worried. Over firing seems to be the biggest concern, but that should not be hard to control and I will be present when it is in use. When I go to bed I will choke it off and it will dies slowly...at which point the air draw will stop and my house will fill with smoke if I leave these holes in the top plate open. That is my biggest concern.

    Other than that, I will still be reading about burning wood this time next year. I have been trying to put this together for under $1k for three months now. I finally just gave up. This thing cost me $130 and is returnable. How ya gonna say no to that?
  20. BrianA

    BrianA New Member

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    you get what you pay for. It takes money to save money.
  21. cwill

    cwill Member

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    Dumpster?

    Some folks just don't want to listen. good luck
  22. MikeThePipe

    MikeThePipe New Member

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    Oh come on. Give me a break. I have explained that I cannot afford a decent stove. I have told you I understand it can overfire, just like many other wood burnign stoves, so stop with the holier than thou stuff. I'm new to this forum, not to life...

    BTW I like your alcove stove. Very nice work. But you know you have a carpet less than 24 inches from the front of that stove. Is that by the book? There is danger in everything.
  23. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    Who has the picture of the two-toned black and white stove?
  24. cwill

    cwill Member

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    I got mine for $250. Point is better stoves can be had for cheap.
  25. fredarm

    fredarm Minister of Fire

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    Wasn't there a guy who posted here quite a bit who had a 1936 Atlanta boxwood in his fireplace? He seemed to manage. My advice is don't burn it when you
    are not home or when you're asleep. I wonder if a piece of soapstone on the top would help block the cracks and even out the heat some.
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