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Well we have some great things happening here in NC

Post in 'The Inglenook' started by Mrs. Krabappel, May 29, 2014.

  1. Mrs. Krabappel

    Mrs. Krabappel Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Messages:
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    Loc:
    Blue Ridge Mountains NC
    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/20...-into-small-beer-town-and-business-is-hopping

    Big Breweries Move Into Small Beer Town — And Business Is Hopping
    by Alastair Bland
    May 28, 2014 1:06 PM ET
    [​IMG]i i
    hide captionJohn Stuart (left) of Green Man Brewery grabs a Tater Ridge mash sample from Sierra Nevada's Scott Jennings (center) at the Sierra Nevada brewery in Mills River, N.C.
    Courtesy of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.
    John Stuart (left) of Green Man Brewery grabs a Tater Ridge mash sample from Sierra Nevada's Scott Jennings (center) at the Sierra Nevada brewery in Mills River, N.C.
    Courtesy of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.
    With more breweries per capita than any U.S. city, Asheville, N.C., has become a sort of Napa Valley of beer. And at the third annual Asheville Beer Week this week, this tight-knit beer community is strutting its stuff with tastings of barrel-aged sour beers and fermented Chinese tea saisons, and chocolate truffle and beer pairings.
    Outsiders have noticed that Asheville's locally owned, small-batch-beer scene is hot. And they want to join the party. The city is now getting a major infusion of new suds and cash as large out-of-state breweries come to town.
    Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., based in Northern California and one of the largest breweries in the country, has opened a production facility just outside the city. New Belgium, of Fort Collins, Colo., is planning to open one here in late 2015. They followOskar Blues, a company from Lyons, Colo., that built a second location in the nearby town of Brevard in 2012.
    While there have been a few quiet grumblings from locals, the city's brewing community has been surprisingly welcoming to the newcomers. Mike Rangel, president of Asheville Brewing Co., says he was initially nervous, but now sees the arrival of the big breweries as a net positive.
    "In a small, cool place like Asheville, everyone is naturally going to be scared that anything big and foreign could spoil the paradise," he says.
    But these concerns were allayed early on as the big breweries showed interest in supporting the local community, not overwhelming it, he says.
    Oskar Blues, for example, has helped the local Blue Ridge Community College develop a brewing curriculum and offered up its own brewing space for use by students.
    Sierra Nevada, which has plans to begin shipping in barley on a customized rail line, may make some of the grain available to local brewers, according to Ryan Arnold, a company spokesman. That grain could end up being cheaper than what the local brewers normally pay shipping it in by truck.
    To woo its new neighbors, Sierra Nevada also hosted 14 Ashevillebreweries at its Chico, Calif., facility in 2012. The group made two new beers that were later released as collaborations, Arnold says.
    [​IMG]ii
    hide captionSierra Nevada's brewery in Mills River, N.C., aglow in early morning light in December 2013. The company was attracted to the Asheville area because it offers access to good water for brewing and the outdoors for employee recreation.
    Courtesy of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.
    Sierra Nevada's brewery in Mills River, N.C., aglow in early morning light in December 2013. The company was attracted to the Asheville area because it offers access to good water for brewing and the outdoors for employee recreation.
    Courtesy of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.
    New Belgium, as well, invited brewers from Asheville'sWicked Weed brewery to make a sour IPA. And New Belgium has made a rye-based IPA using grain from Riverbend Malt House, a brewing supplies outfit in Asheville.
    Another collaboration beer came from Oskar Blues and Thirsty Monk Pub and Brewery, which teamed up to brew an IPA.
    "It's been a real camaraderie thing," says Chall Gray, Thirsty Monk's vice president.
    The big craft breweries' inroads into Asheville come at a time when craft beer nationwide is undergoing a transformation. As we've reported, the Brewers Association, a lobbying group for small brewers, has changed its definition of "craft brewer" to allow larger companies into the category.
    That's stirred up some angst from microbrewers who say the craft beer designation should be reserved solely for the smallest beer-makers — those that may need the most support with lobbying and marketing.
    Even in Asheville, there are undertones of resentment.
    Jessica Reiser, co-founder of Burial Beer Co., says she is overall glad to be making beer alongside such nationally known breweries but has mixed feelings about the tax breaks.
    "I know that North Carolina wants these breweries here and that it's good for tourism, but that's the one gray area for me," says Reiser.
    Arnold of Sierra Nevada acknowledged the company has already received several million dollars in state support to help it build the brewery and generate jobs.
    Jenn Vervier, an Asheville-based spokeswoman for New Belgium, says her brewery will be receiving nothing upfront but has "negotiated a certain incentive" with the city, county and state that will be based upon property tax reports and how many local residents New Belgium employs at the planned $150 million facility. She says the new brewery will employ 140 people, mostly locals.
    But Arnold stressed that Sierra Nevada did not choose Asheville solely for the tax breaks. Access to good water for brewing and the outdoors for employee recreation were key factors, he says.
    New Belgium, too, says it was attracted to Asheville because employees and customers would be able to walk or bike to the brewery.
    And Oskar Blues, which is not receiving government financial incentives, according to spokesman Chad Melis, is moving to the town of Brevard simply because its owners liked the area.
    "We're from a place with great mountain biking, music, beer and adventure," Melis says. "We found a similar atmosphere out here. We knew we were growing, and we thought, rather than keep expanding our first brewery, it would be a hell of a lot more fun way to get bigger to become a part of a second small community."
    Alastair Bland is a freelance writer based in San Francisco who covers food, agriculture and the environment.
    Jags, begreen and fossil like this.

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I will get back to that area someday soon. This sounds like good incentive!
    Mrs. Krabappel likes this.
  3. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Have I ever mentioned that I LOVE drinking beer?
  4. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

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    Salisbury, MD
    I liked Asheville the city, the hippies not so much. Good bars with good food. Got an awesome Oatmeal Porter, I prefer Oatmeal Stouts but this was good none the less. That and they had a taco stand with out of this world fish tacos. Awesome views from the Grove Park Inn.

    WP_000612.jpg

    Too dark to see the drink list but they had quite a bit of good local selection back in 2012, I am sure that list is a lot longer now

    WP_000586.jpg
    Last edited: May 30, 2014
  5. stoveguy2esw

    stoveguy2esw Minister of Fire

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    Nelson County up here in Va has turned into a micro brew mecca as well, its the county just north of us heading up to Charlottesville. several breweries and ciderworks have opened over the last several years. tourism is taking hold, there are quite many wineries as well.

    I like it , it allows jobs to enter the mostly rural count while keeping to the agricultural theme that Nelson county has worked so hard to uphold
    http://www.boldrock.com/
    http://www.dbbrewingcompany.com/
    http://www.bluemountainbarrel.com/
    http://www.woodsmilldistillery.com/

    http://www.aftonmountainvineyards.com/
    http://www.wintergreenwinery.com/
    http://www.veritaswines.com/

    these are just a few there are many more
    http://www.nelsoncounty-va.gov/buscat/wineries-vineyards/
    http://www.nelsoncounty-va.gov/buscat/breweries-distilleries/
    Last edited: May 30, 2014
    semipro likes this.
  6. semipro

    semipro Minister of Fire

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    I had a Devil's Backbone last weekend at a local eatery -- IPA I thought but don't see it on their website.
    With all the microbrews available now it seems a shame not to try them all. ;)
  7. stoveguy2esw

    stoveguy2esw Minister of Fire

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    was it the 8 point IPA? they have like 3 of them currently.

    wanna see a micro take off , find someone who can make the sam adams "chocolate bock" OMG its the best beer ive ever had in the states (or anywhere outside of deuchland)

    devils backbone is a really great micro though , their Vienna Lager is superb. best beer they make and a medal winner
  8. semipro

    semipro Minister of Fire

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    I don't recall but that sounds right. The waitress noted that what was on the menu was on what they had on tap.
    Guess I'll have to go back for clarification.

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