1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

What do you do with your ashes?

Post in 'The Green Room' started by sixman, Apr 29, 2010.

  1. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Slow1: It might work but sounds like a lot depending on what you put in there. If it is sandy it will work but good black dirt needs very little if any.


    Got Wood: The rotary spreaders might work. I've never tried it. But I'm thinking it would not work too great. The ashes might plug up; might not fall down to the bottom too great. Give it a try and let us know if it does a good job or not.


    sixman: We have just thrown ashes like that but found it works better to spread them in the spring and get them spread more evenly.


    SteveKG. Our experience with the cheap ph testers show they are junk. You are right in that most folks don't put that much ash on so it won't change the ph a lot so why worry. On the chicken manure, that is hot stuff! To give you an example, when we spread cow manure and chicken manure, the chicken manure goes on at about 1/4 (or less) as heavy as cow manure. Horse manure should sit in a pile for a year before spreading.


    And finally, if we ever teach Jake how to split wood, that day will be declared a National Holiday for sure! But my wife says his head is about as hard as hickory! :lol: ;-)

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    29,152
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    I take the ashes back to where I found them. To the woods.

    And I run a splitter just like God intended it to be run. Vertical. :coolgrin: But I use a round, not a milk case for a seat. When I split the seat I know the job is done.
  3. kenny chaos

    kenny chaos Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2008
    Messages:
    1,995
    Loc:
    Rochester,ny






    Have you ever found yourself getting kind of attached to a certain round that
    has seemed to serve you especially well?
  4. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    29,152
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    Nah.
  5. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    A round works fine....but I'd still put a hot seat on it. And you are right about the splitting vertical. I do hope Jake sees this post.
  6. geTula

    geTula New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    Heart of Texas (center of Texas)
    I save them up over the winter and spread them lightly over the garden and disk them in with my tractor in the spring. I have a big garden 80'x100' so it can handle a lot of ashes.
  7. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Live Oak, that is a pretty good sized garden. What do you grow down there?

    btw, I just planted sweet corn this week. 19 rows, 120' per row. Planted peas and potatoes also along with some new strawberries.
  8. geTula

    geTula New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    Heart of Texas (center of Texas)
    Backwoods:

    I have sweet corn, black-eyed peas (cow peas to the folks up North), cream peas, pinto beans, tomatoes, bell peppers, banana peppers, jalipeno peppers, yellow squash, and onions up and growing. Planted egg plant and okra today. Also have peach, apricot, plum, and pecan trees. We eat some, can some, and give some away. Usually make several batches of hot sauce from the excess tomatoes and peppers. Every year I ask myself why I do it, but keep doing it anyway. Nothing much better in life than fresh sweet corn straight from the garden.
  9. geTula

    geTula New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    Heart of Texas (center of Texas)
    Backwoods:
    Forgot that I also have an asparagus bed and planted a new one a week ago as well as a new blue berry bush. I don't try to grow black berries though, there are too many rattle snakes around here.

    Used to go Michigan some when I was working. Still have some good friends up there.
  10. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,107
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    That's a whole lotta corn. Do you sell it? If so, how?
  11. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    No we do not sell the corn. We eat fresh and freeze the rest. Also, we do not grow the newer varieties of the super sweet stuff because it does bad things in my belly. We stick with the golden bantam or a golden cross bantam but haven't found any golden cross for many years now. The golden bantam freezes well and tastes fresh all winter long. Also, we never do any blanching of vegetables and found after we quit that the food tastes much better and we also feel that blanching causes a lot of the food value to go down the drain rather than in the belly.

    Actually we don't grow that much for variety in our gardens simply because we don't like a lot of vegetables. Corn, peas and potatoes are the biggies. Tomatoes too.


    Blackberries are delicious! Not many snakes to worry about here. We do have a pretty good sized raspberry patch and some blackberries too. Also strawberries. Then there are a couple full sized peach and apple trees along with some dwarf and semi-dwarf peach and cherries. As you might guess, we do like fruit. The peaches are my favorite when picked right off the tree! I like the Elberta peach too.

    Here's a little hint on the peaches. As you know, after freezing peaches, when you unthaw them they turn brown really fast. That does not have to be! We freeze the peaches in plastic containers and will put a container in the microwave and zap it for a few seconds. Then take a fork and loosed them just a bit and zap for a few more seconds. Then we can remove from the container just the amount we want. Follow up with another zapping or sometimes 2. The key is to not unthaw them fully but leave just a hint of ice.

    As to how long before they would turn brown like this I have never experimented with. I usually just put them on a bowl of cereal and feast right away! It is not as good as fresh off the tree but much better than the old way of eating brown peaches or even worse, canning them.


    btw, somehow I just knew you'd have a pretty good planting of peppers down there. lol

    We too sometimes wonder why we still have a garden....until we start eating from it. Somehow the food just tastes so much better when you've put some sweat into growing it. Also, you know what you are eating vs. buying in a store.
  12. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,107
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Wow, that's still impressive. Would that be about 20 bushels of corn in a good year? With that quantity of good corn, I'd be selling it. Locally they are getting $.50/ear. How do you store all that corn? We don't eat more than a bushel in a year, but there's just the two of us now, so our patch is much more modest. We have blackberries growing up the wazoo growing wild, so no need for cultivation there. But I do have a big old hollow cherry stump that I have growing a monster plant for easy picking. We do have a nice crop of raspberries and strawberries growing and hope to get another couple of peach trees started this year. Thanks for the tip on thawing. We also can up batches of peach halves.
  13. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    The going rate here is also around .50 per ear. We won't get 20 bushel probably as our ground is pretty darned poor. Yellow sand. Over the years we have built it up a bit (they said we'd never do it though) but it still takes a bit of care to do. But we certainly eat more than a bushel of corn!

    BeGreen, I am betting you can grow some good fruit in your area. It should be about ideal. We don't like canned peaches though but find that most folks who can don't like the browning of the frozen peaches.
  14. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,107
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Yes, this is a big fruit region. The mild winters are great for many types of fruit. This year I actually planted a pomegranate. It's a Russian variety, so we'll see how it does.
  15. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    I've always wondered what those things taste like. How big is it now?
  16. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,107
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    About 3ft, just starting to leaf out. I'm not expecting any fruit this year from it.
  17. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    If it is anything like apples or peaches it will take many years before it produces much at all. Seven years is the old standard for when good production starts on most fruit trees. Good luck with it.
  18. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,107
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Pomegranate is a shrub, I'm guessing ours is already at least 2 years old. They start blooming younger than fruit trees. It wouldn't surprise me if it tries to fruit this year, but I will limit it to just a few fruits if it does so the plant puts its energy into establishing good roots. The bigger question is whether we will have enough heat in our summer for it to fruit. They like it hot. I'm hoping the Russian variety will be more cool weather adapted.
  19. Country Lady

    Country Lady Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2007
    Messages:
    44
    Our pecan trees haven't done too well lately and someone told us to put ashes around the trees. Since we had a huge pile of ashes from the Winter, we thought we'd try it. DH spread the ashes around them the first of March. The pecan trees have had a hard time budding out. They're no where nearly as leafed out as others around us. We're thinking we shouldn't have put the ashes around them.
  20. geTula

    geTula New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    Heart of Texas (center of Texas)
    Backwoods:

    While this has nothing to do with ashes, thought I share this.

    We don't have problems with our frozen peaches turning brown after they have thawed. We cut them in slices, sprinkle them with Fruit Fresh and sugar, stir them up good, and freeze them in pint freezer bags. They will hold up in the freezer for several years. We use them on cereal, home made ice cream, on cake and in cobblers.

    As far as freezing corn, I haven't found any way that is satisfactory. I basically don't like frozen vegetables of any kind. Sometines we blanch it and cut it off the cob for freezing. It is ok for soups and stews, but is a lot of work for what you get.
  21. 70marlin

    70marlin New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2010
    Messages:
    175
    Loc:
    Grass Lake mi
    I throw it in the swamp.
  22. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    15,450
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine

    Hmmmm . . . you can tell your wife she is right . . . I am hard headed . . . it's the Irish in me . . . for some reason I'm not much of a drinker, but I can be very stubborn.

Share This Page