What is the longest you can go without reloading?

woodsie8 Posted By woodsie8, Oct 4, 2008 at 1:22 AM

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  1. PapaDave

    PapaDave
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    Feb 23, 2008
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    Geez, last year, we were still burning the first week of June. Started up again the end of Sept., shortest summer I can remember. Of course, with the sometimers and all, ...............
    No really, last nite loaded about 11:15, got up this am about 6. Enough coals to restart w/o assistance from any other incendiary devices. Living room was still 67 deg., and 15 outside. Of course, the living room was probably about 120 deg. an hr. after I went to bed. :cheese:
     
  2. ihookem

    ihookem
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    Jan 25, 2009
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    I can go for many years before reloading if I'm hunting. Actually I think I could have filled up the box and could have gone ten years .
     
  3. Highbeam

    Highbeam
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    Dec 28, 2006
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    Last night we loaded the heritage with three medium to large splits on top of a feew inches of coals at 10PM, this morning (Sunday) we stirred the coals and rekindled the fire with no aid from incendiary devices at 8:30 AM. Those three splits were cottonwood, one of the worst woods available. Yes, the stove was below 200 degrees but the fire was alive.
     
  4. DBoon

    DBoon
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    Jan 14, 2009
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    With a Lopi Answer (1.6 cu ft) I can go overnight - never really timed it out exactly, but if load it at 11pm, in bed by midnight, by 7am I can still get coals for a relight. I'm guessing it goes about 5 hours until it's below 300 degrees.
     
  5. Todd

    Todd
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    Nov 19, 2005
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    Wow! That's impressive especially with Cottonwood, and I bet it wasn't complicated at all. ;-P
     
  6. rickw

    rickw
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    Feb 24, 2007
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    If its cold ( like 10 and below) and I want the heat then under 8 hours. If its not real cold then 12+, max to date is 18 hours. I never use kindling except when it gets cleaned out (2 weeks when burning heavy, 3 weeks now). Never once got up to feed it.
     
  7. techieguy

    techieguy
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    Oct 4, 2008
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    Maybe 14 hours max... Average 8-10 depending on outside temp... The house is no colder than 70 when I wake up, sometime warm as 76.
     
  8. doglady

    doglady
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    Jan 27, 2008
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    I have a Hampton Regency (medium size). I burn Red Maple, seasoned 1 year. To keep it in the "burn" range at around 300F, I need to add wood every 4 hours. That's with the damper and air control lowered.

    I also have a Craftsbury (Hearthstone) which goes for about the same length of time. I added a damper to the stovepipe and modified the air control with the "fix" I got from Hearthstone, but both stoves nowhere get to the 5-7 hours as advertised.
     
  9. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak
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    Oct 17, 2008
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    What does a unit like this cost ?Does it burn the smoke or does it smolder? a 3 Ft. square firebox would be 27Square Ft, thats a lot of wood for 1 filling.
     
  10. begreen

    begreen
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    Nov 18, 2005
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    I can officially say that I've just gone 2 days without loading. Woke up and it was 50 outside, looks like this will be day 3. ;-P

    Actually, with the right packing of soft maple I can get about 12 hrs and still have coals to relight. Stove will be just warm to the touch. But mix in pine and fir and it goes down to about 8-10 hrs. For normal stove operation I go about 6 hrs between refills to keep the stove in heating range (300-650).
     
  11. 10-cc

    10-cc
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    Nov 28, 2008
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    When it is below zero outside, with the T6 heating a whole 3000 sq f, I get a max of 4 hours with fully loader hard dry Maple. Not that to get more heat when it is below zero outside you have no choice but opening for more air otherwise, not enough heat output. Top temps on stove top has to be above 700 F.
     
  12. begreen

    begreen
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    Nov 18, 2005
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    10cc, you have my utmost sympathy. I've never experienced below zero here. With all the glass we have in this house I'm sure we would be stoking it at least as frequently or even more if stuck with softwood. The only solution is to reduce heat loss or throw on more fuel.
     
  13. madison

    madison
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    Sep 12, 2008
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    10ml, How do you deal with coal buildup during the periods with frequent reloading? I probably load 5 AM, 3 PM, 10 PM and have stovetop temps up to 650 and down to 300 at the end of the cycle. I typically open the primary and stir things around an hr or so before reload to decrease the pile of coals. Cleanouts with the "koal keeper" is probably ~ 1/week.

    It most likely is my not totally seasoned wood, but if were to reload as frequently as you do, I would have a massive coal mound. Though lately I am impressed with the locust that I am burning, it maintains its log shape for hours, burns hot, then turns to fluff. And I can reload on top of the locust coals and not have buildup. Unlike the black cherry which seems to go to chunk coals very quickly in the burn cycle.
     
  14. 10-cc

    10-cc
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    Nov 28, 2008
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    Thank Bgreen,

    When coal is builds up, I have no choice but to let it burn with the air inlet fully open after moving the most of the coals to the front and put in few small splits burning at high, also shovelling few out of the front stove once in a while helps.

    I have to say the this T6 stove is NOT our main heat source for the house but a supplement heater.

    The main heat source comes from our dual energy furnace; electric 20KW and Oil 90,000BTU/HR. Since electricity if fairly cheap here (cheapest in N. America I believe). The dual energy furnace is set to run on electricity up to or down to 10.5 F, below this the oil mode will kicks in automatically (as then the electricity will be 40% higher than when above 10.5 F) so this is when I will blast the T6 to its max heat output as I want to reduce oil consumption, (heating oil is expensive here).

    So the T6 is used:
    1. Always 24 hrs when below 10.5 F
    2. When we want to feel cosy
    3. Tacking the humidity out of the basement (spring and autumn)
     
  15. ManiacPD

    ManiacPD
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    Jul 1, 2008
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    5 rounds during deer season, 3 rounds during bird season, 25 rounds at the range with the 10/22...and about 6 hours with the Memco.
     
  16. jpl1nh

    jpl1nh
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    Jan 25, 2007
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    The other night I loaded at 6:30 pm, returned at 2 PM the next day. There were enough embers left to start up again with birch bark etc. No my house was not still 73, it was 61 and the back up furnace had kicked on but I was impresssed with a 1.5' firebox to still be able to relight 19 1/2 hours later.
     
  17. wallpaper79

    wallpaper79
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    Jul 23, 2008
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    Two nights ago I loaded at 10:30. When I got up at 7:30 I still had enough coals to start a burn. Fuel was mostly fir with some spruce.
     
  18. njtomatoguy

    njtomatoguy
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    Jun 20, 2006
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    I covered the air intake on the back of the stove about 85%.
    Amazing difference in burn time.
    ex. Loaded at 5pm, had coals, loaded at 11pm, woke up at 5:30,
    still had bright red hot coals.

    I can't imagine how much wood i've wasted in the past 3 yrs.
     
  19. karri0n

    karri0n
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    Nov 18, 2008
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    The name of this thread should be "What's the longest a thread can go on at hearth.com"
     
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