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what type of wood do you burn?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by iceman, Sep 14, 2010.

  1. iceman

    iceman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Messages:
    2,377
    Loc:
    Springfield Ma (western mass)
    What type of wood do you mostly burn?
    I know location has a lot to do with it but, do you like what you burn?
    I burn mostly red oak .... I hate that it never seems to be completely dry .....
    This year however, .. should be the driest stuff I have burned so far


    So for me mostly. Red oak, and I hate it cause it has to sit so long to dry! recently I have gotten my hands on beech, birch, and honey locust I will try to get those in the rotation maybe as early as next year but who knows how fast they season

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  2. burntime

    burntime New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
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    2,395
    Loc:
    C'mon hunting season!
    I burn...red oak, ash, elm, box elder, shagbark hickory, silver maple, red maple, white oak, lialac, red maple, and anything else that I trim in my yard. I try to stay with the better woods. I love ash, oak, and shagbark hickory the best!
  3. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    3,877
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Mostly white ash, soft maple, red/white oak, shagbark hickory(over night wood) with a little pine, walnut, cherry and poplar mixed in. Next year I'll have some black locust to try, I'm pretty excited about that.
  4. heatwise

    heatwise Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2009
    Messages:
    414
    Loc:
    ohio
    mostly oak then its a mix of ash ,maple,walnut,cherry,poplar,pine,locust and a couple others im not able to id at the moment. seems like lots of oak this past few years. for a whyle it was ash and nothing but ash. nice to have a mix and also different size splits on hand. this wood scrounging never stays the same, its different every year.
  5. relax

    relax New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2008
    Messages:
    181
    Loc:
    Buchanan north dakota
    ok ash elm birch and oak
  6. relax

    relax New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2008
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    181
    Loc:
    Buchanan north dakota
    not hijacking yah but how big do you split your oak
  7. wood spliter

    wood spliter New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2010
    Messages:
    854
    Loc:
    Long Island, ny
    Mostly Locust and Cherry.
  8. Tarmsolo60

    Tarmsolo60 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2007
    Messages:
    306
    Loc:
    Adirondack Mountains
    winter- beech, maple, yellow birch, cherry

    fall and spring- whatever less desirable wood has been cleaned up on my land.

    beech is my favorite
  9. relax

    relax New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2008
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    181
    Loc:
    Buchanan north dakota
    a nice mix of smells
  10. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    Aug 25, 2009
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    10,825
    This is our second year burning and I take whats down, so far Cherry is number one with Sugar Maple and Beech coming in second and third. I hope that we have some softwood for the shoulder season next year which will be Quaking Aspen.

    zap
  11. jimdeq

    jimdeq Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    205
    Loc:
    northeastern wisconsin
    I like to burn green or white ash. Despite what others might say I believe you can cut ash in winter and split it small and have dry wood for the following fall. Does anyone else feel the same?
  12. iceman

    iceman Minister of Fire

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    2,377
    Loc:
    Springfield Ma (western mass)
    All of you that have a variety, which is your favorite? And why?
  13. Cutter

    Cutter New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
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    135
    Loc:
    Tecumseh Kansas
    Hedge followed by some Osage Orange then some more hedge. It is the only decent wood I have access to. I have over a mile of 80 yr old tree lines to do battle with.
  14. iceman

    iceman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    2,377
    Loc:
    Springfield Ma (western mass)


    I try to split smaller to make sure it dries but as someone said in another thread, now that I am 2 years out I will split big blocks and see what happens
  15. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    10,825
    Sugar Maple for it's BTU's, this year I did cut some ironwood which is higher in btu's but it won't be ready until next year plus it is a small tree in diameter.

    zap
  16. lowroadacres

    lowroadacres Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2009
    Messages:
    515
    Loc:
    MB
    I have ready access to Ash, poplar, box elder and elm.

    All work for me, especially when I get them in the combination of standing dead, fallen or free from a tree service friend.

    I even allowed some pine on my yard because we like the smell and the snap and crackle in the fireplace..... And did I say it was free?

    Right now I am working on Box elder and Ash for 2011-12. I will be digging out some more poplar and ash as the winter approaches.

    I will burn anything that is dry.
  17. hoosierhick

    hoosierhick Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
    Messages:
    42
    Loc:
    N.E. Inidana
    Ash, Ash & more Ash.....
  18. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2008
    Messages:
    6,770
    Loc:
    Syracuse NY
    I have burned a lot of free junk in the past but moving into Ash, Beech, Locust and a lot of Maple. Favorite is Locust but haven't burned the big chunks of Beech yet.
  19. DiscoInferno

    DiscoInferno Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2006
    Messages:
    1,332
    Loc:
    Silver Spring, MD/ Munising, MI
    In MD, in rough order of volume: red oak, red maple, pine (red and white), cherry, black locust, ash, hickory, white oak, mulberry, hemlock, elm, honey locust, poplar, pear, beech, silver maple, holly, dogwood, plum, cedar, willow, paulownia. In other words, everything and anything I can scrounge. I enjoy the variety but pine, ash, and black locust would keep me happy.

    In MI: sugar maple, red maple, beech, yellow birch, hemlock, balsam fir, cherry.
  20. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
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    5,740
    Loc:
    Northern MI - in the mitten
    Mostly red oak, white oak, small amounts of hard maple/soft maple, spruce, white pine, and popple.
    Favorite really depends on the weather, but I have to say overall, oak.
  21. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    15,662
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    I mostly burn American Elm (lots of it dying on my two acres), ash (lots of it growing alongside the family fields), birch (white and yellow) and maple (red and sugar).

    I do have a smattering of poplar, black cherry, beech, apple and some softwood.

    Never burned oak, locust or hickory . . . although in another year or two I should have some nicely seasoned oak to try out.

    --------

    In answer to my favorite wood . . . hands down . . . ash . . . splits easily, good coaling, good BTUs and it is pretty straight which is nice for stacking. My wife on the otherhand loves white birch -- mainly because the bark lights right up when she tosses it on hot coals for a reload.
  22. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    You can . . . but try burning some after it has been seaoned for an entire year . . . it's a world of difference . . . more intense fire and better secondaries . . . no hissing or spitting wood . . . and you can have bigger splits for longer-lasting overnight fires. I was pretty happy with my ash (and standing dead elm) that I burned in my first year . . . had some occasional spitters and hissers . . . but when I burned wood last year that had been seasoned for over a year there was a night and day difference . . . and yea . . . my eyes were open to the glory of well seasoned wood. ;)
  23. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    I have some white ash I cut last fall and split in march that is below 20% on the smaller splits, the bigger splits are at 31% or so, my answer is yes the smaller splits, the green ash seasons quicker, I also have some burr oak that was 45% or more last spring and the smaller splits are 18 to 20% with the bigger ones at 35%, I know some of you might have a hard time believing this but that is why I bought the MM, and it confirmed my beliefs I obtained in 30 years of burning. If you split small and stack it right one full summer will get it to 20% or so.
  24. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    3,523
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    I have mostly cherry ( 1st growth forest succumbing to taller trees) and some red oak (blow downs / bugs) a tiny bit of maple and a half cord of gold (yellow) birch.
    Plenty of pine, but the better stuff is keeping me busy enough.
  25. WoodPorn

    WoodPorn Minister of Fire

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    Aug 24, 2009
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    1,497
    Loc:
    South of the beloved Patriots
    Red Oak, White Oak, Hickory, Black Birch, Hard/Soft Maple, White Birch, Ash, Cherry are all easily obtained.

    My favorites in order are; White Oak, Black Birch, Hickory and Red Oak

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