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Where to measure surface temp of a stove.

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by wg_bent, Dec 6, 2005.

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  1. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    On the top of my stove, there is a set of louvers that direct the air flow from the exterior sheet metal of the stove body. Those louvers are not really the surface of the stove, and have air blowing out from under them. There isn't really any other surface the is the "real" surface of the stove. Any reccomendations on where I would put a thermometer?

    Here's a good pic of the Osburn 1800i...(my install isn't really complete yet...I don't have the surround installed yet.)

    http://www.osburn-mfg.com/product.aspx?CategoId=7&Id=245&Page=photo

    In looking at some of the other inserts, (lopi, avalon were a couple I looked at) it appears that the "cook surface" is the outside of the actual stove body, so that would be a good place for a thermometer.

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  2. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    The manual for the stove says to measure the temperature on the "cooktop". Can't see where else that would be except the flat part in front of the surround.
  3. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    There's a concept..."read the manual" Better known as RTFM :) (sigh...shaking head here at own stupidity.)
  4. Rhone

    Rhone Minister of Fire

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    It's particularly difficult to measure temperature of inserts for the reason you mention. My insert has the portion sticking out insulated, with a ripping fire I can touch it for 1/2 sec before I have to pull away. My stove it was an instant burn blister. It sounds like you have a heat shield covering your cooking surface, it reduces clearances to combustibles and improves the amount of heat you transfer to air but also means you can't use normal temperatures like 800 degrees is overfiring. If your manual says the cooking surface shouldn't exceed say 300 degrees then they're compensating and you can use a thermometer. If it says something to the tune of around 800 degrees they aren't compensating for the heat shield and probably you'll just have to guess. They normally insulate or put heat shields for the cooking surface to reduce clearances to combustibles. For example my insert is 60,000 btu's and has only a 24" clearance above. The smaller 40,000 btu insert of mine, has a whopping 34" to combustibles above, it doesn't have any insulation or heat shield on that part sticking out and is a good candidate for using it for cooking, temp gauge, or eco-fan. I had dreams of using that portion for cooking on my insert, now that I've realized it's insulated and stays relatively cool I've pretty much reduced it's purpose to warming or defrosting. Think of this, the Pacific Energy Summit insert is a 97,000 btu insert and has an amazing 19" to combustibles above. Theirs must have two heat shields or extremely insulated.

    I just read the manual, 840F? That is definetely not compensating for the heat shield or cover of the cooking surface. If that piece of figure 2.8 of your manual has space underneath it and air blows under it, it won't reach 840F. If it's a cover that fits directly on top and no space and your air comes out elsewhere then it can reach that high.
  5. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    Well, I'll have to look closer, but that top peice in the picture your referring to just slides into a little tab and isn't really in good contact with the stove body. Personally, if that peice got to 840 degrees, I'm sure I'd feel worried, and I would have had to have put load after load of super dry pine in the stove. On the other hand, the manual also states that if there is deposits on the glass that is a sign of underfiring. I need to clean the glass (just a quick wipe) every day to keep it really clean. That peice gets hot, but 840? The blower exhausts the hot air from under that peice. If it's 840, it's more like plasma than hot air.

    Maybe I am underfiring...but if that's true, then even with full loads of wood, burn times are only about 2-3 hours max. On a minimum setting, the stove will still be pretty warm and have plenty of glowing coals after 8 hours (enough to start a fire within 30 seconds)
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