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Who has experience with tractor tire chains? Little help here.

Post in 'The Gear' started by Gasifier, Feb 28, 2013.

  1. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

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    DUO-LADDER-2.jpg I am looking at purchasing tire chains for the rears on my tractor. Done some research. I have industrial tires on the Kubota, 17.5Lx24. I am thinking of these. What do you guys know/think. Anyone have any experience buying from these guys?

    http://www.tirechain.com/DUO-LADDER-COMBINATION.htm

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  2. Nixon

    Nixon Minister of Fire

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    I run St.Piere double rings on mine . So, i can't tell you that i have any direct experience with tire chains.com .But i've read many posts by people that have bought from them ,and can't recall anything but good words about them .
  3. JustWood

    JustWood Minister of Fire

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    I run those on my tractor and loader. They work great.
  4. Flamestead

    Flamestead Feeling the Heat

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    I bought a pair of chains from them about 10 years ago and was quite pleased with the service and product (double-ring chains for an old Farmall).

    The chains pictured should be fine for moderate use. My current chains are quite a bit more agressive ( http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/extracting.105520/ ) and likewise more expensive. I don't have any pavement to be concerned about tearing up, and I'm dealing with hills, iced stream crossings, deep snow, etc.. Once I tried these I was hooked. I have about 400 hours of use on them and they are about 25% worn.

    If you have pavement, don't have steep hills, aren't feeding cows in pastures with deep snow, ... the ones you are looking at should do well for you. I like that they have 'H' style in addition to the simple crosslinks.
  5. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

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    chaintensionerjpg.jpg I have no pavement. I have a decent incline on my parking area in front of my garage that we park the vehicles in. The two driveways and two parking areas are all crushed stone, so the snow has a tendency to get packed down after a while and starts turning to ice. This causes me to be slipping and sliding while plowing and moving snow. I also cut all my wood in the winter and have had some problems with hills and ice elsewhere. I think the chains will help and I will also add some more weight to the back of the tractor. Do you guys use the tensioner?
  6. Flamestead

    Flamestead Feeling the Heat

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    I do not use the tensioners to remove sags. I put mine on tight. The pattern on mine results in two lines of chain that run the circumference of the tire, just either side of center. I tighten those first, removing all the slack. Sometimes I borrow a chain tightener, sometimes I use a come-a-long (hand winch) to make sure they are on tight. Next I tighten the sides, using the cam/lever-style tightener built into the chain. As the tire and chain wears, resulting in extra chain, it is removed. The only clinking of chain you hear when I drive is the tail link or two of the side chains. My side chains have special links that allow links to be taken up all the way around.

    In the photo above I would cut out links of the side chains between cross chains and re-connect using shackles (U-shaped link with screw connector) so instead of having three links between side connectors there would be two. That way you don't lose crosslinks when shortening it. Then the cam/lever built-in tightener could do its job and there would be much less slop. If cutting your new chain hurts too much, just use the shackles without removing the extra links.

    My chains go onto the tractor for almost 5 months, so I taken 3-4 hours getting them on right. These lighter chains will go on more quickly, but still, taking time to get them on tight will save time in the long run. When I ran the lighter chains on my older tractor I didn't know to put them on as tight, but also was able to run them all winter without the side tensioners. (a narrower, taller tire than yours - might have made some difference)
  7. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for the responses guys. Flamestead, those chains of yours are very nice. The ones that I found like that are over $800. If I had the money I would probably buy them. Maybe I should wait and save the extra money and buy those. But I have the money to get the duo-ladders now. They would probably suffice for me and what I do. The problem with waiting is that something else will probably come up and before I know it the money will be spent on something else we need. ;lol Wife says might want to buy them now instead of fall because lots of things we spend money on in the fall.!!!
  8. Flamestead

    Flamestead Feeling the Heat

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    I think you will be very happy with the duo-ladders. Write back if you have questions on getting them fit right - I can take pictures if that would help more than my explanations. I hear you on keeping things right in the family. The only way I got this tractor was by having her help me run/start/repair our 50's era tractors. She is the one who said let's sell these and buy one decent one, and I managed to get the chains worked in as part of the package. Just have to make sure she doesn't hear me referring to it here as my tractor - she knows it is hers!
  9. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    Unless you need to run across lawns and cant wait until its dry, little tractors seem to really benefit from the narrower/deeper R1s especially if you then add weight. If your primary motivation is pushing snow, I'd consider the v-bar duo grip given the crap that comes off Lake Ontario. Probably not worth it if you have a blower but they make a big difference pushing.
  10. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

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    Ya. I hear ya on that. A bit more expensive, but I have thought about waiting until I have enough money to either buy the v-bar duos or a different type chain like these Talons. Both are expensive though.

    talonchains.jpg

    I am terrible at making up my mind. I also really could use a set of pallet forks. I think I would use those a lot. Moving my wood. Hellooooooo! !!! I don't have a quick attach system on my loader. I am not sure if the three point hitch pallet forks can be tipped up/down a bit because of hilly terrain. Apparently not. It will cost some money to get a SSQA and then have to modify my bucket. Ohhhhh the toys that want my money. :p
  11. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    Can't you just shorten up the top link to get the tilt you need? I throw a 5' hunk of plywood across the loader arms on top of the bucket and stack the wood up until the rear wheels start getting light. Pretty cheap solution that almost triples the capacity of my bucket for firewood. I used to do it without the plywood until a rolling chunk of locust put a dent in my hood>>
  12. gerry100

    gerry100 Minister of Fire

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    I've got chains on the rear of my Massey Ferguson 1010 because I needed the traction to clear snow from my driveway.

    But I've got turf tires, If I had the ag treads I might not need them.

    had a groan of time until I got some cheap chain tensioners at TSC ( about $14).
  13. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Really liked Deere's R3 turf tire offering on the 25-35 hp tractors (3 and 4000 series CUTs) for general use. Good for light snow, could take soft but not soupy mud too. Big meaty lugs but easy enough on all but the most delicate turf. And you can always chain up for deep snow/ice.
  14. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

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    Another guy told me about removing top link and adding a hydraulic cylinder there to get tilt. That would not cost much. I do have hydraulics back there. Just need to decide if I want the forks up front or out back. I think it would be handier to have the forks out front for other things. Can't lift as much though. Eventually I am going to build cribs out of pallets to hold my wood in. This will lead to less handling and save on the back. I don't mind doing it right now, but I have to start making it a little easier on myself. No since working harder moving wood. And I am always looking at ways to save time. Time is of the essence.
  15. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest


    Worth looking into if you ever get a 2nd bucket, forks, or any other loader attachment. I hate d**kin' around with pin on stuff regularly. Green tractors come with that standard. Just sayin'.....;)

    Skid steer carriers are nice, but expensive and unnecessary IMO. Skid steer buckets/attachments are also much heavier than the usual CUT attachments. That robs lift capacity from your loader. The JD quick attach system is a good example of how to get it done without adding a lot of unnecessary weight or complication. And yes, you can buy just the QA plates separate from the loader or attachment. Just have to figure out if they will pin on to the 'bota loader, and weld the QA plates to your bucket(s).

    Also keep in mind with pallet forks, your load center will be at least 24" out from the lower pivot pins on the loader arms, where most advertised lift capacity specs are measured. Do your calculations and have reasonable expectations of what it will lift. Most mid-sized CUT's struggle lifting a 1 ton pallet (ie: Pellets or field stone) more than a few feet and none that I know of will go full-height with that load. Only loader I'm aware of that will take 1 ton (with 24" LC) to full-height is the 400CX on the Deere 4x20 series. (Trying to find current Kubota specs too but it is frustrating, the list everything except lif capacities.)
  16. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    Don't see turf tires and pretty body panels any time soon in my future;lol Even the R1s on the front of my tractor are mounted in reverse.
  17. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

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    I am not expecting the loader on my Kubota to be lifting 1000 lbs with forks on the front. I believe it has around a 1000 lb lift capacity. I am also not planning on lifting any large amount of wood up very high. No need to. I just need to be able to lift a small pallet crib of wood a foot or two off the ground and be able to move it around. As long as I can lift 500-600lbs or so I will be good. It will save me from having to make all those trips with the wheel barrow.
  18. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    At those heights, it will probably lift 1000lbs no prob.

    You need an old apple box like they have at orchards. ;)
  19. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    2WD?
  20. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    4WD...I have a lot of vertical on my property and a lot to do before it is all terraced, filled, graded and drained the way I want it.
  21. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    Do you buy wood and only have to move it once its dry? 500-600 lbs isn't a whole lot of wood if you are trying to move it in the pallet from where you process it to where you store it. I've gone round and round with the handling dilemma too. Pretty set on the idea that my new boiler building is going to have a crib in it that gets filled by the loader through Bilco doors in the roof.
  22. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    If it's 4WD you're not gaining anything by reversing the tread direction. That's done on 2WD machines to improve steering traction in loose soil.

    Don't forget the tread is opposite of what you see from the top down. You want the chevrons pushing mud/etc. away from the tire, not gathering it up underneath. ;)
  23. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    No loose soil here, its all glacial till with voids filled by clay. I reversed them for drive while backing up a grade especially with some weight in the bucket. Makes a big difference for me as my tractor spends almost as much time in reverse as forward. I buried it a few times before a farmer friend suggested reversing the direction of the front tires. Haven't buried it since.

    To give you a sense of the grade, the tractor is 10' below the truck and is probably only 30' from it. If you go 3/4 of a mile west, you are 600' down. I had to claw my old JD 410 2WD hoe with R4s on it up the hill once...wheels turning in reverse while working the hoe.

    My apologies to Gasifier on the side discussion.

    Attached Files:

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  24. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

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    I buy some wood. Usually 10 face cord. Sorry, 3.33333333333333 cord. ;) But I am trying to get away from buying, and buying a little less each year. I burn about 10 cord in a full year. Heat a large home, garage and domestic hot water(DHW) year round. I have thought a little about the Bilco door thing as well. If I put one of those off the back of my basement boiler room I could pick up a bin full of wood and set all the way down to the concrete floor in the basement. Just have some stairs that I could easily move or not have any stairs their at all. I don't need them there really. The wood I cut I process out in the woods and then bring it to the house in the back of the truck or the bucket of the tractor. But the bucket does not hold that much. Sure is nice to bring it back in the bucket though and not have to off-load out of the truck or trailer. ;lol
  25. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

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    That's not necessary SolarAndWood. I started the discussion on tire chains and then changed it myself to pallet forks. ;lol When I was getting ready to buy a tractor one of the things I had to have was forks for it. But I could not find the tractor I wanted with a quick attach bucket and everything else I wanted for the price range I was in. So I bought the closest thing I could find. That one didn't have forks or quick attach. ;hm ;lol

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