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Why the WIRE MESH GASKET?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by tinsley207, Nov 16, 2008.

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  1. tinsley207

    tinsley207 New Member

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    Due to a botched attempt at replacing my griddle gasket I'm going to give it one more shot but this time I'm not interested in using the gasket that is wrapped in wire mesh. This is because I find that with my old VC Resolute 1 Model 043 even with a brand new wire mesh gasket it just plain will not seal well. See my original post here if you wish:

    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/27541/

    What I want to know is why use the wire mesh woven gasket? Is it just because it holds up better with the griddle closing on it time and time again or is it something else? Because if the non mesh stuff seals better and it certainly seems to me that it would then I'd rather replace that every other year if need be just so I can get a good seal. That being said I can't seem to find the proper diameter rope I would need. Seems to me like it could either be 5/16 or even 1/2 " and as regards density I would imagine either low or medium. What do you wizened makers of fire say?!!

    Nate

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  2. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, it may hold up better - which is why it was used. We never had any problems replacing these - you can't use too much cement or that hardens in the wrong place - and a weight of sorts on the lid after you install it.

    If something else was used, I would think fairly dense....
  3. ansehnlich1

    ansehnlich1 Minister of Fire

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    I went to VC's website and checked out their instructions for griddle gasket replacement. I read where it said for one example to use 1/8th inch bead of gasket cement in the channel, then press the gasket in, then trim neatly where the ends meet, then place griddle back on stove and tap with rubber mallet or hammer on wood on griddle to aid in it seating properly. If you have such a gap that this does not work then I would consider an alternative gasket material if it were mine.

    I would also sit something rather heavy on the griddle plate while the cement dried to aid in it compressing and possibly resulting in a better fit.

    My gut tells me less cement is better. Too much cement and it may cause the gasket to harden, that is what the VC website said.

    Come to think of it, are you certain you have ALL the old cement out of the gasket channel prior to starting over? Chunks left in there would certainly not be good when re-doing the job.
  4. tinsley207

    tinsley207 New Member

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    Well I definitely left chunks in there when I redid the gasket. Oops. I just wanted that gasket to sit up high so it wouldn't sink down in. In the original post I described a long slit like gap running along the sides of the griddle. The griddle simply wasn't making contact with the gasket AT ALL! I wanted to avoid that so I didn't even clean out the groove. Then I let the gasket harden without the griddle sitting on it. Again I didn't want it to compress too much. All against the rules, I know, but when the rules were followed by the stove guy there was a bad seal. I just had to try it. I found the same set of instructions on the VC website but no clear indication of the proper diameter of gasket for my stove.

    Finally I saw a post where someone used high temp silicone instead of gasket sealer to adhere the gaskets. Anyone else do this or recommend it?
  5. tinsley207

    tinsley207 New Member

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    Ok my results are in! Well I ended up having good success with a non wire mesh gasket material of fairly low density, meaning very squishy, at 3/8" diameter. Now the stove calls for 5/16" diameter gasket material but I actually tried that with non-mesh stuff and I still got a bad seal!! Ugh! So then I went with the 3/8 and it was bulky but it WORKS! No more leaks and the stove runs very well!
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Great. That's a fine stove. Good to hear it's back up to snuff.
  7. ansehnlich1

    ansehnlich1 Minister of Fire

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    Good to hear you got this straightened out. It's always nice to be able to finally get it right eh?

    Nice job.
  8. tradergordo

    tradergordo Minister of Fire

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    I've used both and found that silicone (doesn't even have to be high temp) works better. Many if not most stove manufacturers have switched to just plain silicone instead of the rutland gasket cement that some like Vermont Castings still use. I know for sure Englander uses silicone. There is a little blurb on this in the following woodheat article:
    http://www.woodheat.org/maintenance/maintenance.htm
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