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Will This Wood Dry In Time

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by fdegree, Jan 22, 2010.

  1. fdegree

    fdegree Feeling the Heat

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    I recently got 6 cords of wood...3 in each bay. This is oak and it is freshly split. The bay opening faces south, if that means anything. I'm wondering if the wood will dry enough by October/November to be used in a new Blaze King?

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  2. twitch

    twitch Member

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    With my limited experience, only my second year of burning, I'd say that if you split it small enough it will burn pretty well in a year. This past spring I split fresh cut oak so the end is about the size of a playing card, and It is burning pretty good. A lot better than the wood I had last year. If you can give it 2 years, it will be better.

    Awesome woodshed by the way!
  3. Stevebass4

    Stevebass4 Minister of Fire

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    not too sure BUT that's an awesome wood shed!
  4. fdegree

    fdegree Feeling the Heat

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    Most of the logs seem to be about 12" in diameter. Some split in half, others split in quarters. I rushed the building of the wood shed, and the delivery of the wood, as quickly as I could...hoping it will dry in time. I guess time will tell.

    Thanks for the compliment on the shed. I designed it so I would have enough wood in any 1 bay for one years worth of burning...capable of holding 4 cords per bay if necessary. Makes it easier to keep track of how much I'm burning and how much wood is being delivered.

    Thanks for responding...
  5. Tony H

    Tony H New Member

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    If you want oak to be good and dry by then take it out when it warms up and cross stack it outside so you can get max air flow and sun then put it back in the shed when it gets close to winter. Most other woods would be fine drying in the shed but oak would normally take more like 18 months to get dry enough to use.
    Nice looking shed
  6. ecocavalier02

    ecocavalier02 Minister of Fire

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    i agree with tony on that one. i just tested my oak that has been drying for two years different pieces are reading between 15 to 20 % moisture content. the maple on the other hand is like 12 to 15 and its only been split a year. with the cat stove your going to need to be careful with that oak being so fresh. i to have my BK Coming on monday and am anxious to see how it goes.
  7. Pagey

    Pagey Minister of Fire

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    Now that's a wood shed! :bug:
  8. ChillyGator

    ChillyGator New Member

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    +2 Very nice!

    I think the outside rows might dry enough but those behind it not so much.

    take what you think you need for next year and get it in the sun/wind as much as possible!

    my stack from April 2009 that got all the sun dried to 20 -22% by late Novmber, the stack next to it that did not get direct sun was still 27%, same wood from my fathers stack that was getting no direct sun/wind was still 31+% when I checked it last week!

    my dry wood is staying under a shed with no sides but my new wood I'm stacking out in the open,crisscross and covering the top with clear plastic enough to keep it from getting soaked but just stapling down every foot or so around the perimeter. Hoping it will dry better than just using the shed. Good luck.
  9. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Either that's one big mother of a shed or you got ripped off. Sure doesn't look like 6 cord to me. Are you talking face cords?
  10. fdegree

    fdegree Feeling the Heat

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    Perhaps the picture is deceiving...or my math is way off. :-S

    There is 3 full cords in each bay. Each bay measures 8' wide by 12' deep and the stacks are about 6' tall. So, each bay has a stack that is 8 x 8 x 6 with enough room in front of the stacks for another cord, at least.

    Next year I will fill the center bay (couldn't afford to do it this year). That will allow me 2 years of drying time for each bay before I burn it (after the first 2 seasons). Hopefully, my estimate of 3 cords per year is close...if not, I have enough room to add more wood to each bay.

    Thanks for all the opinions...perhaps I'll wait another year before taking the plunge into buying the wood stove. I want to be sure I have dry wood so I can avoid a lot of the problems that I read about. I'm too lazy to unstack and restack :red:
  11. Archie

    Archie Member

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    As a fellow mid-atlantic"er" I would suggest your oak may not be optimal by next fall/winter (I'm assuming it is fresh cut). Oak just takes a long time and the humidity in our region doesn't help the drying process. Wouldn't hurt to throw a split on a hot fire next year to check for hiss, though, or get a moisture meter. I would think you'd be good the following winter (11/12) with the wood under a shed. Nice shed by the way.
  12. ChillyGator

    ChillyGator New Member

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    [quote Thanks for all the opinions...perhaps I'll wait another year before taking the plunge into buying the wood stove. I want to be sure I have dry wood so I can avoid a lot of the problems that I read about. I'm too lazy to unstack and restack :red:[/quote]

    I'm getting a lot more 'sweats/split' than I thought possible before I started burning :lol:
  13. Jfk4th

    Jfk4th Minister of Fire

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    Like others have said, get that wood into the sunlight, then around late Sept put it back in the wood shed. Leaving it uncovered in the sun and wind all day will enhance its chances of being ready for a Fall burn. Don't even cover the top, leave the whole thing uncovered and just make sure the wood is off the ground. With oak you need every little bit of sun and wind you can get :)
  14. Stihl Country

    Stihl Country New Member

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    I Love your wood shed,,, But I would,nt even think of burning oak unless it,s at least 18 months old. Even better at 24 months. Even though it will burn good before then you have the creosote problem with unseasoned wood.
  15. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    I've got to comment on the shed. That is nice!
    Been thinking of doing one this year, and that's just about EXACTLY how I envisioned my will look. Thanks for the pics.
    As for the wood,...if you split it smaller than normal (whatever that is to you), it may burn well enough. Keep going when this batch is done, for your 2011 supply, and THAT firewood will put a smile on your face.

    What are the dimensions on that shed. Hard to tell from here. :lol:
    Edit: N/M, didn't read the whole post first.
  16. iskiatomic

    iskiatomic Minister of Fire

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    Holy crap Batman! that has to be the most killer woodshed I have seen. Great job.

    That woodshed make me look like Ghetto haven.

    Let that oak sit as long as you can, at least 24 months. When dry, it's solid gold for heat!

    KC
  17. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Don't know about Oak, but if it could dry by then, you have the perfect wood shed for that to happen :)
    If you see on similar on one of my post in the future, It's because Thats A Perfect Woodshed!
    OK if I use the picture as part of my plans? :) To late

    My wood shed plans: ;-P

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  18. VCBurner

    VCBurner Minister of Fire

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    Beauty of a shed, real pro like stuf!! The bays look like stables. Anyway, I thought a cord was 4x4x8 or 128 cubic feet? Right?
  19. DBoon

    DBoon Minister of Fire

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    If it were mine and it was all I had to burn next season, I would take half of the wood from each bin and split it in half again, and stack it loosely and cross-wise in the middle bin. Then, try to find a cord of cherry or maple you could also use for next year.
  20. iceman

    iceman Minister of Fire

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    great shed!... even if you plan on burning tht wood next year or the year after you need to leave it the way it is or move it... sounds weird i know but since you put the wood in 2 different sides that means you cant put anything in front of it or your "seasoned" wood will be in the "back" and it looks like you cant get to it from the back so you will be limiting yourself .. because all future wood is gonna have to go in the middle... so i would at least empty 1 side let it sit out in the sun for the summer, which would give me 2 full sides to work on for the 11-12 season and so on
  21. JBinKC

    JBinKC Feeling the Heat

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    Another definite no by November if your looking for decent heat output and minimal fussing. I would save it for 2011-2012. However, you probably could burn the smaller 3 inch largest cross sectional pieces with success by the end of March of 2011 (15 months) but would you want to use your better wood for a shoulder season?
  22. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    I certainly would not go to the extreme of re-stacking the wood out into the sun nor would I re-split it. It looks as if you split it pretty small to start with and wind is more important than sun.

    But will it be ready? I doubt it, but it might be possible the outside rows that get wind may be ready...but barely.

    Good luck and congratulations on your new shed and all the work you have done. Looks good.
  23. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Oak Is the hard one to season but it looks like your in a windy spot but I doubt it will be ready if that blaze king has the 2nd burn tubes.
  24. drdoct

    drdoct Feeling the Heat

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    So you buy all your wood? I wouldn't hold of on buying a stove. What I'd do is look around for 1-2 cords of pine or soft hardwood that you should be able to get much cheaper than oak. You could talk to your tree services who probably double as firewood people (down here they do anyway) and let them know that you're interested in some junk firewood that's green. Should be half the price of oak and then you can stack it criss crossed in the middle bin and have some good dry wood to burn to keep a hot fire and use 1 or 2 pieces of the driest oak with each load to sustain the fire. You'll be fine. Shoot, I'm burning 1 yr old oak right now. It's not optimum, but I can maintain 600* and long burns with it. Just got to keep an eye on the chimney. Don't give up on the stove!!!!!
  25. fdegree

    fdegree Feeling the Heat

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    Thanks for all of the compliments on the shed. :coolsmile: I did design it, but I am not the building type...had to get my brother to build it for me.

    For anyone that is interested, the dimensions are as follows...starting from the left most bay:
    Left Bay = 12 x12
    Left Center Bay = 12 x 8
    Right Center Bay = 12 x 8
    Right Bay = 12 x 8
    Overall Dimensions = 12 x 36

    The left most bay I am using for storage, hence no stone floor. The other 3 bays are sized large enough for 5 cords each, if they are stacked 7' high...for a total of 15 cords. I'm hoping to keep enough wood, in any one bay, for one season of burning, allowing the other 2 bays to dry.

    I lined the bottom of the bays with 3/4" stone about 5" - 6" deep...expecting it to settle to about 4" deep.

    Having it divided into sections makes it easier to monitor how much I'm burning, how much I'm receiving from a supplier, and, if I burn from 1 bay at a time, I'm ensuring I don't stack new wood in front of "old" dry wood, which would make it impossible to get to the dry stuff.

    We do have a lot of wind that comes across the field behind the shed...almost all of the time. Been considering a wind generator...maybe some day.

    While the shed was being built, I was telling my neighbors we were going to raise free-range pigs, so they might see some pigs roaming around their yards one day. :lol:

    Anyone that wants to use that design, feel free...unless you are next door to me, I'll never know anyway. ;-)

    Maybe I'll call around to see if any wood suppliers have anything that has been split and drying for a while. If I can swing the cost, I can stack that in the center bay for next season. I don't have high expectations, but it can't hurt to call around.


    Again, thanks for the input and compliments!!!

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