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Winter storage outdoors

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by CowboyAndy, Oct 3, 2008.

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  1. CowboyAndy

    CowboyAndy New Member

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    Man, what a learning curve to burning with wood! I am realizing that my wood for this year (cut in march/april) is no where near fully seasoned. I am already ahead for next year, and learned from my stacking mistakes (right under an eve, logs on ground, etc) and determined the best overall area of the yard to stack. Previously I had several smaller rows, unsupported on the ends (sloping), very disorganized. Now, I have an open area and am doing 2 40x4x20" rows, 1 32x4x20" row and 2 24x4x20" rows for a total of 6 cords. I have approx half that so far, and will cut the rest early spring.

    My question is this: should I cover the rows in any way for the winter? If so, best material to use? Tarp, plywood, plastic, tin?

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  2. d.n.f.

    d.n.f. New Member

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    I use cheapo metal roofing. However I don't have enough this year and will be tarping just the top of the stacks. I don't try to cover the sides. I am using one of those semi-breathable tarps. My neighbour uses heavy plastic and every time I walk past his wood pile I see a lot of trapped moisture. Maybe it works but it doesn't look right to me.
  3. colebrookman

    colebrookman Minister of Fire

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    I use the cheapo blue tarps just on the tops. Last two years. I would like metal roofing or heavy rubber but I haven't found any at my price, free, but I'm still keeping an eye out. Best of luck with your wood burning.
    Ed
  4. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    Cover. It will be snowing slush and you'll be out there trying to unstick a few wet splits thinking- "I wish there was a tarp over this".

    Another thing- slush and melting snow will slide off the tarp and the bottom couple of rows of wood will be saturated. You can rotate that stuff to a dryer place when you get to it or it will be sizzle city when you need it. For unused stacks- get a wider than needed tarp, tie clothes line to the rings, and spread it out and stake it down now so that the rain/snow run off away from the stack.
  5. jbroich

    jbroich New Member

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    Growing up in Minnesota we rotated, too. Pull wood from oldest covered row outside; to stacks in big bins in garage/shop, spent time in garage/shop heated by giant steel smoke dragon; finally, inside house to soapstone stove.
  6. CowboyAndy

    CowboyAndy New Member

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    Just so there is no confusion, this wood that I am inquiring about is for NEXT year... and will be moved indoors by next fall so I am not worried about it going into the furnace snow covered... just storing it for the next 12 months, 5 of them having snow.
  7. FISHBONZ

    FISHBONZ New Member

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    About the tarps. I have wood that is very well seasoned and I have the top covered. Does it make sense to drop the tarp all the way down the sides to keep the rain off it all together? Letting the rain and snow get on it doesn't make sense to me if it's already dry just to let the wind blow on it.

    Thoughts?
  8. colebrookman

    colebrookman Minister of Fire

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    My thought is that condensation will form under the full tarp and cause problems. There are differing opinions and it may be environmental.. I just tarp the top, knock off any snow before I bring the wood in and if it was dried properly it burns nice and hot. I do think a shed would be best, still allow air to circulate but keep rain and snow off making it nicer for me to handle; maybe someday.
    Ed
  9. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    I've never worried about covering any wood - except the ~1/2 face cord rack that sets outside the family room and holds wood that will be burned in a relatively short time period. And that is not so much for 'seasoning' as it is to keep down on the wet, snowy mess getting dragged inside - or having the wood freeze together in a block of ice.

    Also, I don't specifically 'rotate' wood - as in putting effort into it - but if it's getting late in the season, I'll make an effort to burn through sections of the stack which were left over from last year. Generally I have pretty good luck simply starting at the north end of the pile one year and burning to the south, then starting on the south the next and burning to the north.
  10. CowboyAndy

    CowboyAndy New Member

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    So if I am keeping ALL my stuff for NEXT year(09/10) outside all winter, should I cover it at all???
  11. colebrookman

    colebrookman Minister of Fire

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    Either way the wood , unless it's all oak, will be ready to burn next winter.
    Ed
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