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wood for smoking

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by Stevebass4, Nov 3, 2009.

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  1. Stevebass4

    Stevebass4 Minister of Fire

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    awesome - thanks again guys

    heading out at lunch to get one of those remote thermometer probe things

    figure i'll pull it off the smoker when it hits 180 and let it rest for an hour

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  2. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    you can length 3 of those together and moniter your heat in the house when your not smokin! just a little fyi twofore if you will
  3. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Pulled apart with a couple of forks, the addition of a dab of fresh Q sauce, a slightly toasted bun and a hearty beer. A side of good slaw (or even topping off the sammich), and life is good my friend. :coolsmile:
  4. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    those bare claws are worth the price as well, you can pull a 10lb shoulder in just a few min.s even hot
  5. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    Hickory is the old stand by...seems to be in just about everything from baked beans to bacon. I like oak with most beef and chicken - also seems to pair well with a nice oaky red wine if that's your thing. Mesquite is another old stand by. Cherry and apple are a nice change. Who could go without cedar and seafood [me - as the closest ocean is 1000 miles away! :) ] Had some pecan smoked beef brisket once and it was very good - very light flavor. There are all kinds of good smoking woods - just have to experiment and find your taste.
  6. Creature

    Creature Member

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  7. paanta

    paanta New Member

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    That's the truth right there. Pretty much anything cooked low and slow is going to taste _damn_ good. It's almost impossible to go wrong. For wood, any fruit wood is going to be great for lighter flavored meats (chicken, pork, fish) and beef loves hickory/oak/mesquite/etc. You can use almost anything for a rub. Go nuts. Instant espresso, cocoa powder, old bay seasoning, any herbs or spicy peppers, etc. Since you can scrape it off afterward, you don't even need to keep it strictly edible...I'll just toss whole limes and unpeeled garlic in the food processor and puree that with some oil and herbs for a Cuban-ish pork shoulder. Keep the total number of ingredients, down, though or it gets weird. Glazes can be made from anything, too. Try boiling down some beer, wine, coca cola, a half gallon of apple cider, etc and add some mustard and (cider) vinegar.

    Regarding beans, if you're cooking something large like a 10+ lb butt, it takes about as long to cook as dry beans. Soak the beans overnight in the fridge, drain 'em, then add whatever (ketchup, tomato paste, onions, brown sugar, molasses, whiskey, etc), make sure they're covered with liquid, and they should be about right when the pork is done...maybe later. A big dutch oven full of dry beans can go for 24 hours without getting mushy if you cook it slooooooooow. Nothing against the canned stuff, but BBQ is about the process just as much as the final product. Catholics don't drink box wine and eat crackers and call that communion.
  8. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    The ones I know, do. :lol: :lol:
  9. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    yep me too!
  10. Stevebass4

    Stevebass4 Minister of Fire

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    quick question

    do you guys smoke (add chips) though the entire cooking process - or do you stop adding chips at a certain time / temp - and how much wood should i use?

    figure dinner is at 6:00pm Saturday night so 10 lbs id 15 hours - i was going to start cooking tomorrow night around 10:00 and then check it around 1:00 saturday and then if it's done - let it rest for an hour or so in a cooler -
  11. wahoowad

    wahoowad Minister of Fire

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    I take a chop saw and cut baseball size chunks of oak, hickory and cherry off of seasoned splits. I'll bury a few chunks in my charcoal as well as sit a few chunks on top of the charcoal.

    Dayum that stuff smells good while it's smoking!
  12. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Sometimes yes, sometimes no. You can use the batch method of dropping a bunch of smoking wood on and let'er puff till that dies down, then repeat, but most of the times I try to "manage" the smoke depending on what I am smoking. With a butt on the smoker, I would go for a constant 15 hour "light" smoke. Even light smoke for 15 hrs adds up to quite a bit. I use this because it allows time for the meat to do something with the smoke. It is possible to over smoke. You will know this has happened if your meat takes on a bitter flavor. As a first timer, I would rather you be on the light side and produce something still edible than to destroy your product beyond consumption. By "light" I mean to always see an opaque wood smoke coming from the smoker, not the chimney of a steam engine.

    Thats a totally different method than if I were doing fish or some thick cut chops. That I will do with the "batch" method for probably 3 doses (depending on thickness).

    This is a discussion that will have as many answers as those that choose to answer. Its like trying to give out your recipe for the perfect chili. :coolsmirk:
  13. kenny chaos

    kenny chaos Minister of Fire

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    My old homemade 55 gallon drum grill finally dropped its bottom.
    I just needed something to contain a fire, preferably with a top.
    I found one of those charcoal grills that look like a flying saucer
    for $20 at Dollar General (seasonal clearance) and figured that would be
    a whole lot easier and better than building something else.
    It was the big one, 20" across at the top.
    I placed a metal plate on the lower rack that holds
    the charcoal and placed fire brick around that to help
    contain heat and to protect the thin metal from over-heat damage.
    It's basically a fire pit on legs, with a top.
    I pick up tiny branches out of the yard and get a fire going.
    I add pieces from my wood processing and get a good bed of coals.
    Now the fun part;
    Add the meat.
    If I want to crisp it up first, I put on fresh wood and leave the top off.
    If it gets flaming too much, simply cover and the flames will die and the smoke will build.
    As it dies down, remove cover to regenerate fire.
    I kinda play with it and manipulate it by adding wood, covering,
    uncovering. As the wood burns down, more heat from coals and less smoke.
    It's a whole lot easier to do than it is to explain.
    Here's a blog by a handy gal who does some very yummy and creative cooking;
    http://cowgirlscountry.blogspot.com/
  14. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    lol and there you have it
  15. Stevebass4

    Stevebass4 Minister of Fire

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    well good advise to go lite on the smoke for the first time - Thanks again guys!
  16. Stevebass4

    Stevebass4 Minister of Fire

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    getting there

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  17. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Looking good!
  18. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    AND...........?????????
  19. kenny chaos

    kenny chaos Minister of Fire

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    He's in the hospital from smoke inhalation. :lol:
  20. Stevebass4

    Stevebass4 Minister of Fire

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    :lol: it came out AWESOME - everyone enjoyed it although there was hardly any leftovers from a 10 lb butt between 6 people after it was cooked

    think next up some ribs

    Thanks again for all your help guys
  21. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    COOL. For your ribs, stick to the same cooking method and temps, but hold the cook time to ~4 hours or a little more. You should be able to grab a rib bone and twist it in the socket.

    Also, an hourly spritz with a little apple juice is a nice thing.
  22. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Jags your a wise man!
  23. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm a food whore. :cheese:
  24. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    me too
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