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Wood Gun - Center Brick replacement.

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by Gasifier, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

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    This replacement completed after about 16 cord burned through the E100.

    Attached Files:

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  2. muncybob

    muncybob Minister of Fire

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    Yep, I'd say it was about due.
  3. avc8130

    avc8130 Minister of Fire

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    It's tough to tell. How "shot" were the nozzles? I can't imagine they were all broken up in the boiler. I assume that happened when you removed them.

    What made you stay with the ceramic nozzles?
  4. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

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    How are you doing avc? Take a close look at the second picture. If you click on the picture it should get much bigger for you. Those red embers you see are below those center bricks in the ceramic tube. Take a look at the slot at the bottom of the picture or the slot closest to the door of the boiler. That one got the least wear and tear. It was in pretty good shape, almost like new. The ones in the back and toward the center got the most wear and tear. They were in bad shape. Wore out about 2.5 times their normal size in varying shapes. I was getting a lot of blow through of ashes, and large red hot coals into the ceramic tube below. That made it so I needed to clean more often. The breaking up did happen when I took them out. The picture of the tools and safety glasses is what I put together to prepare for the job. The manual said the center bricks "can be removed by simply lifting them out." :confused:o_O Aaaa. Yaaaa. It took a little gentle persuassion, carefully as to not hurt the large ceramics and especially that ledge the center bricks sit on. So far, so good. I stayed with the ceramic nozzles because I see no reason to switch to the steel ones. I think 16 cord is a good amount of wood to put through them. I do not know if the steel ones they sell would stand up that long. But I am pretty happy with the ceramic ones. I will wait to here from someone who has bought the steel ones and see how long they last. I had to be careful, doing it when the boiler was still pretty warm made it interesting. ;lol I could have waited and let the boiler cool all the way down. But I said what the hell. If I did that I would have had to let the oil boiler turn on. :mad: Not going to happen. I had safety glasses on, a long sleeve shirt, heavy duty gloves that went up my forearm over my long sleeve shirt, boots and heavy jeans. ;lol Got er done with no burns or problems. ;lol
  5. avc8130

    avc8130 Minister of Fire

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    OH! That makes a lot more sense! LOL

    Sounds like a job well done. It was pretty obvious to me that they wouldn't just "lift out". The ash packs in there really nicely and gets solid.

    I am planning on making a steel "overlay" for my nozzles next summer just to experiment.

    ac
  6. infinitymike

    infinitymike Minister of Fire

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    I can't believe you didn't make it through 2 seasons!

    I just cleaned out the fire box since it was 50* yesterday and mine have a little erosion.
    I've burned about 6 cord last season of extremely green locust, cherry and oak.
    So far this year I've burned about 6.5 cord of moderately seasoned ash maple and cherry.
  7. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

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    I am happy with 16 full cord of wood through it. That is a lot of heat going through those things. I am surprised you went through so much wood in that time with the size house you have. I am guessing part of that reason may be because the wood was not very dry. And now you will be going through more wood with your DHW hooked up. But your wood should be gradually getting dryer since you have been working on getting ahead. Right? I also think that once you get your ceiling and walls insulated and rocked in your garage you will notice a huge difference. When you are home and all is well you could leave the door open between the garage and house and let the heat that radiates off the boiler help heat your house. It will heat that garage up in now time, that is for sure. There is your next project when you take a vacation Mike. ;)
  8. infinitymike

    infinitymike Minister of Fire

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    Are you sure that it was 16 FULL cord not your New York Yankee Face cord. :)
    Awh, just poking. It has to be full cord for that monster mansion you live in! And the temps you see are a heck of a lot colder then I will ever see.

    There's a lot of reasons why I burned through so much even with the somewhat mild temps.
    1. Un seasoned wood
    2. Half insulated and rocked garage
    3. Incorrect plumbing.

    The side door to the garage has no direct access to the house. So there's no way to allow radiant heat to transfer in.
    The garage wall and house wall are common but the side door is toward the back and under a covered walkway between the house and garage.

    I think 1 and 3 are a major problem.
    Just by switching the position of the supply and return lines of the WG as they enter in my primary/ secondary loop reduced my burn time by 25%
    Now if I can reposition the supply and return lines of the 3 zones I might reduce my burn time by even more.

    Anyway I wonder if you put a SS grating over the nozzles if you would see them last longer.
  9. topoftheriver

    topoftheriver Member

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    How many square feet are you heating with that much wood? Seem like a lot to me. That would last me 4 year on the average.
  10. avc8130

    avc8130 Minister of Fire

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    I was thinking about making a nozzle overlay. Basically a piece of .25" steel with the nozzles cut in to take the major erosion on the corners. Project for next summer.
  11. Heaterhunter

    Heaterhunter Member

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    Newbie alert! Newbie alert! Dreaming of an outdoor or indoor gasifier and was just wondering what those nozzles cost to replace? Is this a typical replacement item for all gasifiers? Thanks.
  12. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

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    I am heating a 4200 sq.ft. house, a 900 sq.ft. garage, and all the domestic hot water (DHW) that we use. That 16 cord of wood is from October 1, 2011 until now. I burn one short fire a day all summer long to heat buffer tank up. That keeps us in plenty of hot water for 24 hours or more. The hot water from buffer tank or boiler heats our DHW through an indirect hot water tank. Triangle Tube Smart Series. Flawless. Nothing like walking by the oil tank and seeing the gauge sitting in the same spot everytime. :cool:
  13. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

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    The nozzle, or center brick as Alternate Heating Systems calls them, cost me $120 I think. On the Wood Gun they say usually between 10-15 cord of wood. That is full cord. Everyone talks real cord on Hearth. Not the "face" cord we talk about up here in Northern New York. Don't get that conversation started. I have converted to real cord. No more discussion. Oh. ;emI started that didn't I? ;lol
  14. CTFIRE

    CTFIRE Member

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    Gasifer -
    I looked at the Triangle tube website. Looks interesting. Hadn't thought about burning wood in the summer. Was looking at some electric and other options. Doesn't the boiler temp go cold with only one small fire a day? Is the indirect a zone off your main boiler or is it off the domestic coil in the WG. Forgive my ignorance, I am only 11 weeks into this. Love the WG, just figuring out what to do for dhw over the spring and summer. thx
  15. Gasifier

    Gasifier Minister of Fire

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    The boiler is insulated, but it does cool down. But the temp usually does not go down below, oh say 130 degrees, if I remember right. It all depends what time of year and if there is any heat demand at all from house. It takes a little getting use to during spring, summer, and fall. Late spring and early fall there is not much heat demand, if any. The indirect is a zone of it's own off of the primary loop from Wood Boiler. I have a primary loop that goes from Wood Gun/Buffer tank over to and past Oil boiler/manifold(which feeds all zones) and then back to Wood Gun/Buffer tank. Love your avatar! I am so smart, s....... ;lol doh!
  16. avc8130

    avc8130 Minister of Fire

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    Only the sides, top and upper portion of the rear are insulated. The door and face of the unit lose heat like there is no tomorrow. I HEATED 1500 sq ft of basement just off the radiant heat of the unit.

    Is your buffer tank just in the primary loop? In other words, it is the same temp as the boiler?

    ac
  17. CTFIRE

    CTFIRE Member

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    So I wasn't sure if I should start a new thread. Figured this was maintenance as well. Above my cyclone I have a vertical piece that extends it two feet then an 90 degree elbow into a horizontal run of 8 or 9 feet. I have been running for 10 weeks now and have been astonished at how little ash I am cleaning out of the cyclone bin and the lower doors. I have been cleaning every week and my 30 gal garbage can outside (pic 3) is only 65% full. I decide to remove the elbow today to inspect the horizontal run. I was concerned maybe the ash was get into there. I found only 2 inches of ash extending about 6 feet in the run. Needless to say I was happy, since I was anticipating a lot more. Amazed at how little ash is created. Love the WG

    pipe2.JPG pipe1.JPG bin.JPG
  18. avc8130

    avc8130 Minister of Fire

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    That's a pretty long horizontal run.

    In hindsight, and if I ever re-do my chimney connector, I will probably try to cut the corner with some 45s next time to reduce the horizontal run as much as possible.

    That should let the cyclone ash drawer be as effective as possible. I find the cyclone/ash drawer combo to be one of my favorite features of this boiler.

    ac
  19. muncybob

    muncybob Minister of Fire

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    CT, mine is set up very similar to yours. I find that a fair amount of ash accumulates in the elbow at the bottom of my 32' chimney. I made a clean out tool from some pvc pipes and pull that ash out from the T I have above the cyclone about twice per season. The first year I ran the WG and had the chimney cleaned the chimney was about 75% blocked at that bottom elbow.
    The long horizontal run was not the way I wanted to do this but could not see any other way due to the location the boiler had to be and to be sure I had enough room behind it for cleaning, etc.

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