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Wood Hauling Truck

Post in 'The Gear' started by Vic99, Dec 30, 2009.

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  1. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    Ya- hey- go ahead and pull a cord of wood in your Saturn. That thing is a beast LOL

    I've been thinking about going with a truck and smaller car combo- I have a killa commute to work, but need to haul wood and stuff for shows.

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  2. backpack09

    backpack09 Minister of Fire

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    I would recommend a good trailer and a car/suv that will tow 5000 lbs

    but be warned if you go with a trailer... damned commiewealth of taxachoosetts now charges you 100$ a year for the tag (20$ per 1000 lbs)... its only 50$ a ever other year for a car.
  3. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    All duallies are one tons (Fords F350, chevy 3500, dodge 3500) but each brand also makes one tons with single rear wheels so that you get way more payload than a 3/4 ton but not the extra width of 4 tires in back. I know that even Toyota used to see a "one ton" model and also a dually which is what I think elderthewelder has in his photo. Those toyotas are from the 80s though and are now rare.

    I am not sure why you think that a bigger truck costs more. Have you even looked at them?

    You can have enough truck to haul the load and you can have a trailer to haul even more load. Why not get both? Nof60 and I are on the same page with this one.

    Attached Files:

  4. TreePapa

    TreePapa Minister of Fire

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    In these parts (urban Los Angeles) a used small truck (4 cyl toy or nissan) with the same mileage and similarly equipped often actually sells for MORE than a 3/4 ton with the same mileage and goodies (i.e. a/c, power this and that).

    OTOH, I've had my '94 Ferd Ranger (V6, Auto, Air) for over 10 years, it's got over 195 thousand miles, and still runnin' strong. Just can't get 1/2 cord in it. With the toolbox, I got about 1/3 cord in it, now with the toolbox (crossbed mounted about six in. behind the cab due to lumber rack), it's more like 1/6 to 1/4 cord, and that's with stuffing wood between the cab and the toolbox and under the toolbox too. But it's my daily driver and as much as I'd like to have a bigger truck, I wouldn't really like DRIVING a bigger truck in the city as much.

    Peace,
    - Sequoia
  5. 08brute

    08brute Member

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    I love my $100 77 Dodge 3/4 ton. It has a 318 with a 4 speed and can haul a lot! The best thing about it... it cost me $100 from the local hospital (maint. truck) so if i beat it up i dont shed tears. I would look at trucks from the 80's and early 90's. They are getting dirt cheap (Under $1000 in many cases) so if you scratch, dent, or damage it in any way it wont hurt as bad. Trucks from back then were also very reliable. I choose my 77 dodge over my 99 F250 Diesel most of the time for wood hauling. I find myself gently placing the wood in the box when i take the ford. Also look into a well built pickup box trailer. These usually run around $100 and are fairly easily pulled. My $.02.
  6. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    I also recommend going 3/4 or 1 ton, you get bigger breaks, drivetrain, etc. Used lightly, the heavier truck components will last a long time. Even a full size pickup box fills up pretty fast when you have to pile the wood around the wheel wells, especially if you are loading bigger rounds or longer logs. The best wood hauler is a flatbed with removable side racks.
    Here's my $700 wood hauler.
    [​IMG]
  7. JeffRey30747

    JeffRey30747 Member

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    I have a '01 Tacoma Double cab 4WD V6 pickup and would not recommend it to anyone who plans on hauling much wood. Most of the 5'x5' bed is behind the axle so it squats something terrible with very little load. I once put 1200 lb. of sakrete in it as close to the cab as possible and it still looked overloaded. I would say that the '85 4cyl 4WD that died from frame rust was a much more capable hauler than any Tacoma I have seen. '85 and back Toyotas have leaf springs in the front instead of IFS. The ride isn't as nice but the leaf springs are a much tougher system. The Tacoma does handle a trailer better than the previous Toyota with its more powerful engine. The Tacoma is my daily driver (18-21 mpg gas) and does fine with small loads (below 800 lbs.) in the cargo area.
    All that being said, I have the F350 (10-14 mpg diesel) for when I need a real truck. If you are going full size anyway, look at the 3/4 & 1 tons. Much more truck for not that much more money. The small trucks do still have their benefits, especially if you are in a tight area. My old '85 would go places that the 350 just will not fit into and all else being equal I still prefer to drive the smaller trucks except for long trips despite the fact that I am 6 feet tall and 190 lbs. If you are much taller/bigger though you won't fit into a small truck near as well.
  8. Beowulf

    Beowulf New Member

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    I have been driving trucks for fun and profit since I was a kid. 1950 Ford F1, 1954 Chevy 3/4 ton, 1966 Chevy 1/2 ton, 1970 Ford F250 (3/4 ton), 1986 Chevy C3500 1 ton dually, 1979 Ford F150 (1/2 ton, still have.) I keep them around while we drive other cars for commutes, etc. I am currently shopping SoCal/Central Valley area and will be buying a Ford F350 4x4 dually, either V10 or 7.3L Diesel, depending on what I find at what price.

    I am seeing great deals on Ford 1 tons (4x4 duallies) in the $5,000 to $7,000 range with 80,000 to 200,000+ miles. Condition is everything; I am not afraid of high miles, if the the maintenance records and my inspection support the condition. I'm a former mechanic, so don't mind looking at them myself.

    I think with $3.00+ gas that a lot of city cowboys are giving up their monster trucks for economy cars. I am surprised at how many ads I see offering to trade for smaller vehicles. However, if you are not going to put a lot of miles on the vehicle, and are not afraid of 10 mpg when you do drive it, the big trucks are the way to go. Reliable and safe under load, usually a little more ground clearance for getting around in the woods, and most of the time highly reliable with reasonable maintenance.

    My thougths...
  9. Vic99

    Vic99 Minister of Fire

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    Test drove a 2000 GMC Sierra 1500 long bed 4WD V8 4.8 L regular cab with 100k miles on it in good condition. Seemed good. Consumer Reports rates it average. I know they says stay away from some of the later models.

    My mechanic said it is solid.

    I found Max GVWR at 6,400 lbs and curb weight of 4,066 lbs. Am I right in assuming that I could carry about 2,300 lbs minus my weight?

    Anyone have any experience with this truck for hauling, engine, etc.
  10. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    I'd ssay it is not enough truck to haul much and last. Look at 3/4 ton trucks.
  11. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    I'm not a fan of SRW 1-tons other than it's the only option for a longbed crew cab.

    Payload is not increased over a 3/4 ton because tires are the first thing to hit the limit - even E-range tires. The extra brakes and heavier running gear is nice, however.
  12. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    If you insist on driving a woman's truck at least get it with a short bed. Way too easy to overload a 1/2 ton with a long bed. Just a thought.
  13. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    Here is my wood hauler/work truck. Love the turbo, love the whole truck actually. It has an upgraded GVW to 10,000 lbs pulls anything, got a good deal because of the bed and it was just what I was looking for. You might consider looking into fleet vehicles, or commercial lease vehicles, some had strict maintenance schedules, can save alot of money on a late model.

    Attached Files:

  14. Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle

    Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle Minister of Fire

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    Watch it, Redd. Or me and the girl friends can come on the road ;-)


    Vic, get a bigger truck. It's like the small fire in a big stove thing %-P

    Better to be a little over trucked, and have no worries, than to have the opposite happen, and regret it. My 2 cents from truck shopping with specific requirements.
  15. scotsman

    scotsman Feeling the Heat

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    Well, from downcher in Texas, where everbody has a truck, I'm gonna tell ya th' straight skinny. I have a 1-ton Ford van (4.10 rear end, E4OD tranny and a 460 CID engine) that I bought to pull a travel trailer. Never bought the travel trailer, but did buy a single-axle 6 by 12 Magnum trailer that I helped design. This trailer can haul 2400 lbs. and I've had 3200 on it, but it was way HEAVY! My truck can handle it, but I wish I'd gotten a double axle trailer. However, this rig works well for me.

    Since it's gonna be an extra, what I'd do is get a flatbed 3/4 or 1 ton used truck with stake sides on it like Flatbed suggested. Then find, borrow or rent a double axle trailer to hook on back of your flatbed when you go after big loads OR find someone who has a BIG (3 to 6 ton) stakeside dump bed and cut them in for part of the wood. The flatbed will take care of probably 90% of your finds. You should get reasonable road mileage, but will have that extra capacity for small to medium sized loads. If and when you DO get your own trailer, make sure it's a dump bed. That is the single most useful item since double ply TP! That way you can go get a load, come home, dump it and go back for another and not have to handle it so many times. You can stack it later! The primary concern for me is to get it home.

    I used to work at a dealership and sold trucks of all sizes. Believe me, you want an older truck. Most "trucks" these days aren't built much, if any, better than passenger cars cause that's how most folks use 'em. If you want a new "truck" you have to go up to at least the 3/4 ton before you start finding the heavier duty components that can handle the loads. For my money, I like a good stout trailer for haulin' wood. Trailers are built to be loaded heavy, today's trucks aren't!

    There y'go! That's just the approach I'd take. Yours and many others may vary.
  16. ribs1

    ribs1 New Member

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    Where do you find these fleet vehicles?
  17. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    Here we have the Auto and RV magizines, I see you are in Michigan, you also have the Michigan Auto and RV mag. I believe. Check in that or on their website for dealers that offer fleet or off of lease trucks, just have to flip through it, don't know anyone specific.
  18. ROBERT F

    ROBERT F Minister of Fire

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    It looked over loaded cause it was! whats the payload capacity on that truck?
  19. KarlP

    KarlP Feeling the Heat

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    Somewhere between 1250 and 1400lbs depending on options. You can get regular cab Tacomas with over 2000lbs of payload. Sure the GVWR is lower, but the empty truck weighs a few thousand pounds less too! The '01 models have less towing capacity, horsepower, brakes, room, etc than the current generation Tacoma. But they have more payload and are better offroad.

    Personally I wouldn't consider hauling 1/2 cord of green oak in a four door Tacoma/Frontier/Ranger/Dakota. A half cord of green oak is ~2800lbs. While its not true that it is illegal to exceed the mfg weight sticker on the truck in the US, exceeding it by 1500+lbs in this class truck is dumb. You'd have to add E rated tires and airbags and even then might bend the axle or frame if you hit a dip too fast.

    Now you can haul that much with such a truck safely, just not in it. I've moved 3/4 of a cord of seasoned silver maple with my Taco many times. However, I only put 40% in the truck. The other 60% gets put in the trailer behind it. The Tacoma has plenty of power, brakes, and curb weight for that load, but its lacking the rear suspension/axle capacity.

    I'd consider a trailer, smaller loads, 1 ton single rear wheel gasoline engine truck (heavy diesel engine eats payload and the price premium isn't worth it if you aren't using it regularly), and 1 ton cargo van in that order.
  20. Vic99

    Vic99 Minister of Fire

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    Lots to consider, which is part of the fun.

    Currently I seem to be going on 2-3 cutting excursions a year which merit multiple trips. Usually it's about a 1/2 hour away. That's why my ideal situation is to carry a 1/2 cord of green red oak. More wood be better, but for the amount of wood I get a year, I don't see getting bigger than a mid sized truck.

    Hadn't really thought about seriously getting a trailer into the woods. Since some of the paths I've traveled were tight squeezes, I didn't see that as feasible. Maybe I just lack the experience with that kind of vehicle. Obviously a trailer makes sense when the coworker says "A storm hit my property and I have a 20 inch dbh tree down, want it?" About half my wood comes from such colleagues, neighbors and town workers cutting.

    Truck is going to be a second vehicle. Dually is good for wood, but not my style (or wife's) for other uses. Mpg doesn't matter since not primary vehicle. Trying to balance reliability and vehicle price with hauling wood. I now see what others have said about older bigger vehicles not costing more or much more. Started looking at gov fleet auctions. Next auction in area (90 minute drive) that I could find is one month away. Like to make a deal sooner.
  21. sublime68charger

    sublime68charger Member

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    if your careful you can get a 1/2 ton truck and use it as a wood hauler.

    the 1/2 ton will ride a little better when empty get a little better mileage when empty.
    handles worse when loaded and won't stop as nice. as long as you know your limits you'll be fine.

    my 78 Ford brings home 15 loads a year. My wood lot is 6 miles from my house. 5 of which are Highway miles. I can also due backroads from the woodlot to home which means I can drive slower 45mph or less traffic is 1 or 2 cars till I'm in town and then city traffic. My old truck wander's some down the road, so if its having a bad wandering day I take back roads home and go slower I don't have to push her up to speed on the highway that way.

    My dad has a 83 chevy 1/2 ton that has hauled 15 to 25 loads a year 6-10 miles since 85 and still going strong.

    alot depend's on what type of traffic you have to drive in?
    is it bumper to bumper and you have to deal with drivers pulling in front of you, getting cut off and such.

    I can leave my wood lot and only have to stop the truck 4 times and I'm home.

    [​IMG]

    her's a Pic of the old girl and my overload trailer. behind it.
    Was cutting up slab wood with tractor and Buzzz saw and wanted to get as much in 1 load as possible this is the only time I have even pulled that trailer home.
  22. Vic99

    Vic99 Minister of Fire

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    Very Nice !
  23. Elderthewelder

    Elderthewelder Minister of Fire

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    Pics of a full load of Oak in my 2002 Nissan Frontier, yeah, it may have been a little overloaded
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  24. sublime68charger

    sublime68charger Member

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    If your talking about my truck Thanks she's a 78 Ford F150 Ranger/Explorer.

    my Grandpa got it in 1984 with 23,000 on her, I bought it from him in 1999 with 58,000 now at 67,000 I only put on about 1,000 a year hauling wood and other Misc things and its my backup truck if my DD or the wifes DD is down.

    Box sides are rusted out bad and it needs a paint job maybe in 2 years when the house is paid off I'll have the $$ for a paint job and fix her up right.

    also I have collector plates on it since 99 I paid $120 for them that year and haven't had to pay for plates since.

    with the collector plates though your not suppose to have more than 300lbs in the box. was what somebody told me the local police haven't harressed me yet about that and If I due get pulled over with a load I'll just dummy up and say I didnt know that.
    and not suppose to drive the 3 winter months of Dec/Jan/Feb last year I drove her daily from July till Jan as my DD went down and I wasn't sticking money in to fix the DD saved up to get another better DD.

    sublime out.
  25. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    That's a "full load"

    Really?
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