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wood insert into masonary chimney installation

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by JimA, Sep 23, 2006.

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  1. JimA

    JimA New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Messages:
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    Loc:
    Champlain N.Y.
    I am installing a new wood insert into my chimney that had a very old insert in it before. I want to do the installation correct. What parts am I going to need. How far up the chimney do I need to go with my stainless 6" pipe. I understand there is a kit to run the pipe through that seals off whwere the old damper was. Where is a good place to purchase this. Any help on the installation would be helpful. Thanks

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  2. pgmr

    pgmr Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2006
    Messages:
    398
    Loc:
    Central Indiana
    I went all the way to the top with my stainless, so I wouldn't have to deal with pulling the stove out to clean. I just pull out the Condar thermometer, open the damper, check that doors and air controls are closed tightly and start brushing (top to bottom). All the creosote falls into the stove, where it is easy to clean out.
  3. bobm

    bobm New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2006
    Messages:
    21
    >How far up the chimney do I need to go with my stainless 6” pipe. <
    I looked at an installation manual on the Jotul Website. They insist that the pipe should fit up into the first flue tile. You might start with the manual for the stove and see what they say. I like the idea of running it all the way to the top of easy cleaning and better draft if your current flew is oversized for the stove, i.e, putting the 6” pipe into a 13x13 flue.

    I am no expert but this is what I have recently learned here and elsewhere.
  4. joshuaviktor

    joshuaviktor New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2005
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    Loc:
    Northwest New Jersey
    A SS liner is almost never a bad idea. Easier to clean, better draft, easier to arrange the cleaning, (no pulling out of insert to clean), and keeps the creosote formation down by keeping the air moving up the chimney hotter, not letting the creosote cool down enough to settle on the sides.

    Is it cheap? Not really.

    But it's a good idea.
  5. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Your Jotul manual claims compliance to NFPA 211 this being so no fireplace chimney located with any walls exposed to the outside requires a full length liner Per guidelines of the cross-sectional code for example you may vent up two time the cross sectional area
    of the flue collar inan chimney exposed to an exterior location 6" Flue collar = 28" cross-sectional area times two = 56" 8/12 masonry flue cross-sectional area is 76" way too large to comply with code. Now if the chimney is in an interior location the code will allow 3x the cross-sectional area which is 84" which is larger the 76 therefore permissiable. All bets are off witha 12/12 flue a liner is required.

    Welcome to the forum. You came here seeking advice. Here is the best way to install your insert, Cut out your damper plate to allow full round diameter liner to pass threw that area and continue with a full liner, with damper plate and top plate and correct termination cap. Any other installation will be a compromise. Your stove may never achive optium opperations. Check all the post here where poor drafting ist due to lee than optimual Venting./ Burn times heat output back puffing are just some of the symptons. One would be better served, by buying a less expensive insert with a good venting system. Your venting system is more important, than the brand name of the stove. There will be very few posters that will dispute this post. the majority will dido what I have outlined code wise there is no dispute. I hope this will influence you and help you make the best decision concerning your stove and it's installation
  6. seaken

    seaken Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Shokan, NY
    Isn't "dido" a British pop artist? Anyway, I do ditto what Elk has said. The chimney system is the most important part of the whole deal. Don't scrimp on venting if you don't have to. If you do a full reline things will go much better. The owners manuals will usually allow a direct connect (pipe only up to the first/lowest flue tile) but it is never the best vent system. If you are really strapped for cash it is allowable but I would suggest you avoid it if you can.
  7. JimA

    JimA New Member

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    Loc:
    Champlain N.Y.
    So its looks like running a flexible liner is the best thing to do. Any preferences on manufacturers or preferred web sites to buy from. I quess I might as well do the job right so I wont run into any problems later. Do you guys reccommend the wrap around insulation over the poured insulation for around the liner. Thanks
    Jim
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