1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Wood seasoning/storage question

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by jeffee, Oct 2, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. jeffee

    jeffee New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2007
    Messages:
    143
    Loc:
    Western Ma
    Hi. I'm thinking of putting in a commercially available wood shed so I don't have to use tarps. I live in a sometimes breezy/ windy area. The shed is 6 x 10, and between 6 1/2 and 8 1/2 feet tall (8 1/2 only at roof peak). If I stuffed it I figure I could get 2 1/2 or 3 cords in there, which is what I need. In the middle of one of the 10 foot sides is a 6 x 6 opening, and there are a couple of small gable vents. Question is, will I be able to season wood in there? So if I acquire somewhat green wood (splits) in say March and put it in there, do you think it would be burnable and somewhat dry come burning season? Standard mix of hard woods.

    Thank you for any advice!

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. jpl1nh

    jpl1nh Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2007
    Messages:
    1,572
    Loc:
    Newfields NH
    No, I don't think it would season well in the shed. Not enough air can get through the big tight mass of wood you would have in there. Instead, stack it in long, loose narrow rows, outside in as much sun and wind as you can, top covered only (or not), then move it into the shed mid fall when its dry. Dry seasoned hardwood would last for decades in your shed except it burns so well that it won't. ;-)
  3. jeffee

    jeffee New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2007
    Messages:
    143
    Loc:
    Western Ma
    Thanks for your reply. Yeah I was kind of hoping to save myself that work of moving the stack (in future years). The shed would be a good 60 feet away from where I would stack it to season it. I may have to spring for a wood hauling cart too. More money to spend that I don't have.
  4. gerry100

    gerry100 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    Messages:
    498
    Loc:
    NY Capitol Region
    I've been drying tight stacked wood in a shed with basiclly one side open for years and it works well. The air and wind gets thru.

    Your problem is not air circulation but time. The March - October stretch is just not enough.

    Mine is in the shed from 12 - 16 months.
  5. jeffee

    jeffee New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2007
    Messages:
    143
    Loc:
    Western Ma
    How about if I had a 6 x 6 opening on both of the long sides of the shed? Do you folks think that would help? Then I could tarp over the windy side when there's a blowing snow/rain storm expected, and maybe the wood would have better air during the summer months for seasoning.
  6. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    Messages:
    15,969
    Loc:
    Anderson, Indiana
    Now your thinking!
  7. jeffee

    jeffee New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2007
    Messages:
    143
    Loc:
    Western Ma
    Thanks smokinj and all!
  8. the_guad

    the_guad New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2006
    Messages:
    113
    Loc:
    No Va
    You may not be able to get away from moving your stacks around. I end up with two stacks and have to do a little rotation because I don't have a big yard. I have one stack (3-4 days worth) next to the back door of very seasoned wood. 1 Stack of wood from last season out behind the garage and a stack of new stuff to season. The stack of seasoned wood close to the house is a MUST for those cold/wet nights when you want to keep the fire going but just don't want to put your boots on.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page