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Wood shed ?'s

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by sly22guy, Oct 30, 2008.

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  1. sly22guy

    sly22guy New Member

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    Im going to build a wood shed. the spot i have picked is over a stoned area beside my driveway. the end that would be open would be toward the north. I was considering building it 8' wide 10' deep 8' tall with a roof. the south east & west sides i was gona put latice work on, the front would be open. the length of the logs would be approx 15-18" long. so id have bout 5 rows with bout 6-8" in between each row. So im figuring i could store about 10 cord of wood? Would this be sufficent air flow? Or if you have any better ideas im all ears. pics are good too

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  2. Roxburyeric

    Roxburyeric Member

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    One thing you might try and build into it is access from both sides so you can load on one side and take the more seasoned wood from the other side, otherwise you will always be taking out the wood you just put in. Just a thought.
  3. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    No matter how you slice it, 8' x 10' x 8' = 640 cubic feet, so if you were able to absolutely stuff it completely full of neatly stacked wood , you'd have exactly 5 cords in it, at 128 cubic feet per cord. Here's a pic of mine. 12' x 16', with 144 square feet of floor, the rest open. Stacked full, 7' high, it would theoretically hold 7 7/8 cords. Realistically, I'll probably stuff about 6 1/2 or so into it, so I still have some floor to step up on to reach the top of the stacks. Rick

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  4. madrone

    madrone Minister of Fire

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    Wha? What the...? Damnit Rick, your wood shed is nicer than my house! And you get to live in Bend. What am I doing wrong?
  5. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    I think you have sufficient air flow but if you just attached a lean-to to the garage it would give you more room to rotate the wood.
  6. Ken45

    Ken45 Minister of Fire

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    Several guys on here have mentioned that the $700 metal carports are less costly and much easier to put up (the crew does it in less than two hours). I went that way. 18x22 and I figure I can get about ten cord in it. Certainly not as pretty as fossil's but then if **I** had built one myself, it wouldn't look that nice anyway!

    Ken
  7. sly22guy

    sly22guy New Member

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    Building against the garage is not an option. yeah i was figuring a face cord not a full cord. I guess ill have to remeasure maybe i can fit a 12x10 where i wana put it. I noticed you have solid sides on yours, is the back open also?
  8. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Lots of space for airflow all around. At least 1/2" gap between all floor and siding boards. Besides, I don't load it with anything but seasoned wood, this is my "ready service locker" just a few feet from either front or back door to the house. My wood seasons outside with full exposure to the elements until it's ready for shedding. Rick
  9. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    I seriously doubt you're doing anything "wrong", madrone. I'm actually a California native, but spent 30+ years in the Navy, lived all over the place, we have little family left but the core of it is native Oregonians, so we decided to join them in our retirement. Moved here just 14 months ago, and love it. I'm never moving again. Sure would like to get my hands on a few cords of Madrone! Rick
  10. pinewoodburner

    pinewoodburner Feeling the Heat

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    Season your wood before moving into the shed. Yes you will have to handle the wood twice, but you want seasoned wood.

    Rick, what type of splitter is that. How do you like it. Jeff
  11. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Sharp looking woodshed . . . I was looking for something along these lines . . . I may elect to more or less copy your "plan" for my own woodshed with a few FFJake modifications.
  12. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Lots of my wood seasons in a heap of splits...I don't take the time to neatly stack it. I'm not particularly space-constrained, nor "view-constrained". The shed needed to look "nice" because it sits right next to the house. I have more wood outside the shed than in it, but the shed'll hold about a season's worth (two stoves, softwoods, retired=~7 cords/season). Lots of it gets split one more time before going into the shed, then sits in there a few more summer months before it gets burned. I just don't want to devote shed space to spacing between stacks...I pack it pretty tightly and full, but there's still airflow through it. The shed's a convenience to keep the rain & snow off the wood that's to be burned during the current season, so I don't have to fuss with tarps. Yes, the shed's a luxury...isn't that what retirement's s'posed to be about? The splitter's an MTD Yard Machines 25-ton with a B&S;engine from Home Depot, and I like it just fine...it's more splitter than I need, but what the heck? Rick
  13. tdibiasio

    tdibiasio Member

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    I would think that the latice would not work that well over time. I built my shed several years ago and used T-111 for siding with standard 2x4 walls (all lumber being pressure treated) and I have noticed that the siding is starting to bow out in the middle of sides and back. I would be concerned that the latice would simply break as I dont think it has that much strength. I think if the desire would be to have airflow through the sides and back then I would suggest using something like rough cut pine with 3 or 4" spacing between.

    On a seperate note - my original shed was 8' x 16' with a stacking hight of 7' with all area above this point to the peak being open space. I just spent my lunch hour at the lumber yard ordering the material to add on an additional 8'x16' to the right hand side of the existing shed. Now that will be the cats PJ's -> 8'x32' and will hold enough wood for two winters. I will finally get a full year of seasoning before burning.
  14. sly22guy

    sly22guy New Member

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    Yeah i think that i am gona go with Ricks style. Im gona make it to store the seasoned wood. (wood has already been sitting for about a year and now i just want to store it nice for the winter.) So I think ill go for the 10x12 if i can squeeze it and copy ricks design with a few of my own touches.
    I have an area that i can pile splits till there seasoned up in the back 40 that gets lots of sun. Thanks for all the info and pics!
  15. jpl1nh

    jpl1nh Minister of Fire

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    I agree with tdibiasio, lattice won't cut it. The stacked wood ends up putting a fair amount of pressure on the walls. Rick, that is a beautiful design, nice job! I'm curious about the floor plan of your house. You say it's your "ready wood" close to either your front or back door. Are both front and back doors in the same spot or can't you remember if the door by your shed is the front one or the back one? ;-P
  16. GrantC

    GrantC Member

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    If you're not living in Bend, you're doing things RIGHT! :lol:

    -=[ Grant ]=-
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