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wood splitter question...

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by crow, Dec 25, 2005.

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  1. crow

    crow New Member

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    Has anyone out there ever tried the "easy-split wood splitter " found at northlineexpress.com ?

    There is a similar wood-splitter offered at Plow and Hearth .

    My stove is supposed to take a 16" log...but some of the splits are just a little too big(very aggravating!!!)
    and I find that a large spit smothers the fire in a small fire box, so I need to knock some of my logs down into smaller splits to get good intermediate size wood that's larger than kindling , but smaller than the splits I had delivered.

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks and happy holiday!

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  2. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    I use a maul and occasionally a wedge to split all of my wood. That thing looks like more of a hassle to use compared to picking up an 8 pound maul and giving a wack.

    Splitting splits usually doesn't require much effort.
  3. ChrisN

    ChrisN Feeling the Heat

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    I agree with Sandor, Simplify Simplify Simplify
  4. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    I have always wondered about these solutions but never tried them. Up till last year, never used anything but old faithfull mall and splitting wedges. Now I use a 16 ton electric splitter and still hand maul. Figuring 4 cords a year 25 plus years 100 cords split with a common maul. Never had a gym membership either
  5. adrpga498

    adrpga498 Minister of Fire

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    Elk,
    Like you, I would rather split using the maul but I have come to an age where I may consider a splitter. But, I'm not too keen on another gas engine to keep running when I may only use it once a year. Debating if I would be better renting for under $100.00 a day for purchase the larger electric type for those real large rounds that become more of a challenge with age. So, I am basicaly asking would you recomend the electric? vs. rent gas,and or purchase a minimum 20 ton gas.
  6. adrpga498

    adrpga498 Minister of Fire

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    Elk,
    Like you, I would rather split using the maul but I have come to an age where I may consider a splitter. But, I'm not too keen on another gas engine to keep running when I may only use it once a year. Debating if I would be better renting for under $100.00 a day for purchase the larger electric type for those real large rounds that become more of a challenge with age. So, I am basicaly asking would you recomend the electric? vs. rent gas,and or purchase a 20 ton gas.
  7. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    Elm!!!
  8. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

  9. crow

    crow New Member

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    Well , The wood's already bought and delivered...and I'v gotta be able to burn it whether it wants to fit in the stove or not.
    I checked out Brother Bart's post about the chainsaw buddy on the "Gear" forum...and I may end up going that route...eventually.
    But That would entail purchasing a chainsaw as well as the "buddy" & I'm still payin' for the stove at this point .
    So, I'm gonna be the guinea pig for this Easysplitter . I know all you well seasoned veterins of woodheating are gonna giggle at me. But I am a city chick who will probably feel better with a gaget than a wedge and maul(let alone a chain saw...) Next season , I'll know what to expect , what size wood I need , all that jazz.

    For the moment , I have to make what I have work for me...w/as few additional expenses as possible.
    I have to recut some of the wood no matter what method I use... and I definitely need some intermediate splits that are somewhere between kindling and the regular size splits that I have. So we'll see how it works . and I'll let you know how it all shakes out.

    fun with learning curves...gotta luv it.

    the only thing that annoys me, is that the stove manual states that the stove will take a 16" split. well it would if you could get it in the door...but they fail to mention that part. Ideally, a 14 inch log should be the recommended maximum.

    hmmm.I feel a letter to hearthstone coming on.

    Otherwise , I am Extremely happy with my stove.
  10. annette

    annette Member

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    I've looked into that type of splitter. I really don't want to split wood without some mechanical advantage. The one I first read about is called the Smart Splitter from AGMA. There was some discussion of it on GardenWeb, and I found some customer testimonials on a site that sells it. I'll email those to you, in case they help. The best price I oculd find for the Smart Splitter was $85 ($10 shipping) from improvementscatalog.com.

    I hope you will do a review of it, as I will either buy the same item or a small electric splitter.
  11. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    I have a suggestion for you girls. How about and electric chain saw? no gas engine to maintain no effort
    to start it and much lighter rhan any gas chainsaw. I use one along with my electric splitter. Another advantage
    they are cheaper, under $100. Look for either 14" 0r 16" blade and 3 or more HP. If kept sharp, they will do the
    job or trimming logs you desire. I have worked the small electric splitters I was amazed at what the ryobi 4 ton
    splitter could do. What I like about the Ryobi, first it is a brand name. can be bought at Home Depot and (if unstaisfied
    returned.) Two year warranty with a repair distrobution network in place. Unlike other small unit electric splitters (off brands)
    Most important it will take a 20 " log up to 12" round. Most are limited to 14.5" and smaller diameter.
    The amazing thing about them is what they will split and the speed they do it. Impressed me, and two button safety opperation prevents accidental opperation. The Ryobi is the best small 4 ton electric splitter hands down. $299 Very easy to opperate. amazing powerfull for 4 tons. Will it split the knarly knuckle log no, but will do every thing else within reason. So quick that it is finished before you can pick up another log to feed it
  12. crow

    crow New Member

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    Thanks Elk. That's good advice. I know I will need to get a good chainsaw in the not so distant future . They just (for good reason) intimidate me a bit . So it is nice to know that there are smaller , lighter weight electric ones that will do a good job .

    And since I have made the commitment to buying and trying the easysplitter...you will all get my full report on my findings.

    I'm not a small person, and I've done my share of physical labor...but I like the idea that the weight is built in to the device . And that the aim is controlled by the placement of the blade of the device. Seems like it would be hard to miss your mark. And be easier on your back and arms.

    In any event I'll let you know the result.
  13. annette

    annette Member

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    Elk, thanks for the info. If I decide to get an electric splitter that will be the one. There are a lot of woodsy lots with dead trees around my neighborhood, so I'd need a gas chainsaw for collecting that. My boyfriend has one, so I may not need to buy one for awhile. He likes splitting wood, but I don't. I don't mind borrowing a chainsaw, but asking him to do all the splitting isn't fair.
  14. crow

    crow New Member

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    Okay folks, I have the easy splitter. I think it works pretty well.
    It weighs about 13 lbs. and is basically a splitting wedge on the end of a pole with a weight that can slide up and down the pole.
    You position a piece of wood beneath the wedge , slide the weight to the top just beneath the handle , and throw the weight down . It takes a few good throws of the weight to split a log, but over all seems pretty easy . I would recommend using it on a stump. But you can use it with just a board beneath(which is what I am doing , since I have yet to get a good stump.) the advantage of a stump is that you totally eliminate the need to bend over at all to pick up the weight, because the whole thing would be elevated as high as the stump is. Great if you have a bad back, etc.

    I give it a thumbs up , so far. I don't know how it would hold up to giant quantities of wood to split, but I'll let you know.
  15. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Craig has one for sale in the sale items wanted forum
  16. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    I haven't reported back on the Chainsaw Buddy since I had said I would be back if I have anything negative to say about it. Well, not a problem with it. In fact on the subject of electric saws, I put it on a three horse Remington electric saw yesterday and made short work of cutting a quarter cord of twenty four inch splits into stuff small enough for the Jotul F100. Rip, zip and done. It is great to just toss a bunch of splits on the ground and go at them without worrying about the chain going into the dirt.

    This spring it will be a permanent attachment on one of my baby Poulan limbing saws.

    PS: I got the Remington electric brand new at an auction for two bucks.
  17. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Brother brett, I have burned out 3 of those Remingtons, Cheap money, last 3 plus years, and worth every penny I saved the chains and bars but they burn out before I can swap them. Nice to have another sharp chain to swap out though. You are starting to see my setup. Electric chain saw cut, then turn on the electric splitter split. Oh Halftime is over, time to watch Brady do a 3 peat 4 supper bowls in 5 years.
  18. crow

    crow New Member

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    I also bought a 16 " sears craftsman electric chainsaw(3.5 hp).
    Do you think this would work well with a chainsaw buddy?
    Does the chaisaw buddy keep you from having to worry about kick back and pinching the bar with the log?
    I've never used a chainsaw before...and just reading the instructions will freak you out. Every other sentence is DANGER! DANGER!LOSS OF LIFE AND LIMB! KICK BACK! PINCH KICK BACK!

    It made me want to put it back in the box and return it. Pronto.

    The only thing I need it for , is to buck down these darn splits . And I can't think of any other way to do that . But I want to do it as safely as possible.

    Do you think the chainsaw buddy would be a good way for me to go?

    Or is there a good way to minimize the possibility of kick back and pinch kick back on these small splits(they are 16") and I need to eithr take a few inches of the end or saw them in half.
  19. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    The CB does not do anything to prevent kickback or pinching a bar. Those are facts of chainsaw use life and pretty much solely in the hands of the operator. The CB's job is to allow you to cut small wood on the ground without having to risk cutting a foot off by placing your foot on the piece to hold it still while you cut. Or sticking the chain in the dirt and instantly dulling it. Their is a little kickback protection if it keeps you from hitting a rock on the ground with the tip of the bar.

    I will just add to the fear factors in your manual. Chainsaws are the most dangerous tool on the planet in my estimation. Also the vast majority of chainsaw injuries occur while limbing and bucking, not feeling trees. I have a pretty good memory of what deep inside my left leg looks like from my "big" accident bucking out an iron wood tree. The mind wandered. I didn't pay attention and I paid for it.

    Get some instruction from an experienced user and ALWAYS respect what that saw can do. And never use it when you are alone. Make sure someone is around in case of a problem.
  20. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    The opperation of cutting of small pieces can be of lower risk than bucking a tree. My suggestion is to make a coulpe od x sawhorses and place the sutting split securely between the x es This will accomplish two things secure the wood and elevate the work t off the ground toa much more comfortable position. If the piece you are cutting is secure chances of accidents are lessened.
    Kickbacks occure when the the weight of the tree binds the saw or using the tip to cut. In your opperation one their is no weight of the tree to bind and two you should not have to be using the tip to cut. Rememder to elevate the piece your ac cutting so as to not groung the tip and chain in the dirt. apply moderate constant pressure and lessen it up as you near the finish cut Two hands on the saw you should be ok Think of what you are doing and watch. If distracted and looking away you are not in control that is when problems or accidents can happen. The Sears 3.5 hp should do the job just fine
  21. wvstriper

    wvstriper New Member

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  22. crow

    crow New Member

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    Wow! This looks great ! Have you used this?

    I think I would be much more comfortable with this. The splits I have will be a good size for this tool to handle.

    I know it poses danger also , but it seems a little less threatening since the chainsaw part is not completely exposed.
  23. wvstriper

    wvstriper New Member

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    I haven't used one (or seen one for that matter) yet! I saw it in the latest issue of Popular Mechanics. I does look interesting. If Home Cheapot starts to carry it, I've got a gift card to burn!
  24. crow

    crow New Member

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    Well ,I slept on it after reading all the reports I can find about the black&decker alligator lopper , and I think I am gonna return the unused chainsaw to Sears, and invest in this tool instead. It would be just the thing for dealing with some of the over growth growing in my yard as well .
    The chainsaw just makes me too nervous . This lopper looks formidable, but not nearly as intimidating .
    Because my stove is so small, I'm splitting my wood down to 3 and 4 inch splits . So this would deal with those just fine, I think.
    I 'll leave the heavier splits that are already a good length for the stove alone for burning direct on a good bed of coals , and knock everything else down to size .

    Thanks a lot for pointing this product out to me. I'll let you know how it pans out .


    crow
  25. nrmahoney@cox.net

    nrmahoney@cox.net Member

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