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Wood Splitting Ax Review

Post in 'The Gear' started by WarmGuy, Mar 6, 2006.

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  1. WarmGuy

    WarmGuy Minister of Fire

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    About 10 years ago I bought the special ax pictured here. The unusual thing about this ax is the it has two levers which, when you strike the wood, spread out, pushing the wood apart. In the picture you can see one of them. If you can't imagine it, think of diving head first into the crack of the wood, putting your hands on each side, and keeping your arms straight. As you move into the crack, your arms would push the two halves of the log apart.

    This ax has mostly sat in my shed, while I used a normal ax for splitting. But I thought I'd give it another try today, and it really worked quite well. Working with large cypress rounds, I split the wood at a faster rate than normal. You don't get the satisfying feeling of the ax going all the way through the wood. Instead, it stops near the top, but the two halves of the log fly apart. Also, the ax never gets stuck in the log. If the log doesn't split, I either try again, or pull the ax out and and work with my wedges.

    The head is a little heavier than I prefer -- can't get it moving as fast, but it has won me over, and I plan to use it primarily in the future.

    I originally paid $35 for it, and I don't know if these are still available. So, if you see one of these, know that it's not just a gimmick.

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  2. WarmGuy

    WarmGuy Minister of Fire

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  3. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    Last year i epoxied my Snow and Nealy head to a fiberglass handle. Hasnt flown off yet. We sell that type of ax as shown in the photo at my work, and we sell quite a few of them. I will have to give it a try sometime.
  4. carpniels

    carpniels Minister of Fire

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    Hi Guys,

    My father in the Netherlands has had one of these for years. When I was young, it was the first axe I used. It works great for splitting wood and indeed does not get stuck in the wood ever.

    I never knew they sold them over here too. Where can I get one and what do they cost?

    Thanks

    Carpniels
  5. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    If you cant find one localy, i will check at work as far as cost and shipping. PM me your shipping info.
  6. carpniels

    carpniels Minister of Fire

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    Hi MSG,

    Thanks for the offer to help. Yes, please let me know what it costs. Shipping might be expensive. My zip is 13440.

    I need a new chain for my saw, so I will go to my logging store and get one. I will also ask about this type of maul. I also want to look at a snow and nealley. Supposed to be top notch.

    can't wait for this weekend. 50+ degrees. Time to hit the woods.

    Carpniels
  7. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy Minister of Fire

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    When i get back from the show i will look into it. I wont be in the office anymore this week.
    I dont know if there is a big differance in ax heads. I love my snow and neally, but then again its the only head i have ever bought. So i have nothing to compare it too.
  8. WarmGuy

    WarmGuy Minister of Fire

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  9. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I've recently discovered that epoxy is the best way to hold a maul head onto a handle. I'm talking about a wooden handle and a forged steel maul head. Just goop everything up real good with the epoxy before driving the head into place. Then goop up the wooden wedge and drive it in. Trim everything off, put a little more epoxy on the exposed wood and wedge end, and you're good to go.

    I think what kills wooden maul handles (other than misplaced swings) is the head sliding around on the end of the handle. Over time it will crack the wood. With a good glue job, everything stays tight and will last a lot longer.
  10. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Uh. Ok.
  11. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    BBart, your bad.

    On the epoxy issue, do not buy the "5 Minute" stuff. It cures too fast and is too brittle. Buy the stuff that takes 24 hours to cure.

    Just my experience.
  12. adrpga498

    adrpga498 Minister of Fire

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    I have a Sears maul I bought about 8 years ago that has a tappered black plastic collar on it. When the wood handle broke (user error) all I had to do was purchase another wood handle to which the plastic collar slipped on first and then the maul head, 6lb. slipped onto the "notched" collar. No need for epoxy and I like the lighter weight maul . More clubhead speed equals more success. Just my 2cents worth.
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