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Woodpiles, Part II

Post in 'The Inglenook' started by drewmo, Feb 6, 2007.

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  1. drewmo

    drewmo Feeling the Heat

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    I do a lot of driving for my job and find myself in some pretty picturesque places, mostly throughout the French and Swiss Alps. I try to bring my camera on most trips in case I come across anything beautiful or unique. Since installing our woodstove and browsing (more like lurking) through these forums, I'm constantly noticing woodpiles during my drives. I thought I'd post a few of the better finds here as I come across them. I'm constantly amazed at how neat and orderly the woodpiles are built over here. Not sure if it's a European thing, or if it's just the precise nature of the French, more so the Swiss.

    These pictures were taken about a week ago in a small village called La Chapelle de Abondance. The house appears to be an old farmhouse, where the owners of the farm would provide room and board to their workers during the season. Um, do you think he could have made the stack any tighter?

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  2. tutu_sue

    tutu_sue New Member

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    They must have an abundance of patience and very straight trees. Here in New Jersey our trees are a bit crooked - like our politicians! How are the temperatures by you? We're at 3F with the wind chill right now.
  3. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Great pictures drewmo , always glad you can share.

    From a distance one might even over look the stacks of wood being next to the house , thus brings up the question of how well these stacks actually dry being so tight and up against the wall of the house with no air flow.

    Again , great posts drewmo.
  4. Gunner

    Gunner New Member

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    WOODPILE PORN
  5. MrGriz

    MrGriz New Member

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    Great pics, thanks for posting.

    Roo, I thought the same thing, it looks like the pile is at least two rows deep and packed in close to the house. I would still take it though ;-)
  6. Gunner

    Gunner New Member

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    I bet there atleast 1-2 year ahead of the game plus it looks to have good sun for part of the day.

    I doubt someone who takes that much care in stacking, is burning half seasoned wood, but you never know.
  7. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    I did some photo editing and also took the pic to 135 x 135 in size ( 35% larger ) and as you can now see in the center of the pile where the hole is there is more wood then meets the eye.

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  8. drewmo

    drewmo Feeling the Heat

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    The pile faces due south, so it does get good sun. Good mountain breezes as well, but I can't imagine much air circulates through the stack. The porch overhang is at least 3 feet deep, more like 4, and the wood is stacked to the very edge. It's been a mild winter, just about at the freezing point right now. I'll have to monitor how quick they're going through the wood. I'll also try to post larger photos in the future. Glad I can share some of my jaw-dropping moments with those that appreciate it.
  9. Mo Heat

    Mo Heat Mod Emeritus

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    I visited my b-n-l a couple times while he lived in Austria. I was also struck by the symmetry of the wood there, with each piece and the the stacks being so perfect. He actually had to buy his wood (for his massive hybrid metal and tile stove), so it was already seasoned (and I don't mean like here in Missouri, either) and ready to burn. I also noticed stacks of wood all over the countryside there, drying. Maybe they picked it up from the woods and delivered it as it was bought. His was beech wood.
  10. MrGriz

    MrGriz New Member

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    Wowie Zowie, there was a bunch hiding behind that outside row.

    Good work detective Roo
  11. TreeCo

    TreeCo Member

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    We stack our wood on cement blocks around our garage overhang. This gives us eight slots each about 10ft long by 8ft. high. We only stack one layer deep and our wood is cut to 22 inches. We've used old blocks to keep wood off of the ground for over 20 years. They work great.

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  12. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Now something like that should get plenty of air flow .
  13. drewmo

    drewmo Feeling the Heat

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    Here's a unique set up. Not sure if this guy has stacked the wood to burn or simply to make an addition to what appears to be a garage. In the view from the back/side, there's no visible support to the roof other than the stack itself! The splits are all a meter in length, and most of the wood in the back seems to be aged longer than that stacked on the side and front. Photo taken this week in Les Gets, France, best known for it's skiing and mountain biking.

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  14. drewmo

    drewmo Feeling the Heat

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    ... and a close up of the door.

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  15. Bushfire

    Bushfire Member

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    Incredible stuff. Kepp em coming, if you have more. Brings back fond memories of my childhood when my folks would drag me all around Europe and the alps in the summer time, and occassionly in the winter, too.
  16. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Interesting........................Great shots drewmo.
  17. Harley

    Harley Minister of Fire

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    Great pics, Drewmo... This is the one that has me somewhat baffled... so ... what's behind the door??? wood??? if not, what's holding up the wood above the door?

    I'll admit... I probably would have peeked in the door... :red:
  18. DavidV

    DavidV New Member

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    makes me laugh. I love the way they burn wood over there but it always makes me shake my head and laugh. I almost got into a fight in Berlin( my level head prevailed over the desires of the wimpy whispy college boy who wanted to kick my American buttocks.) because we are such poluters. When I lived in Germany I took many trips into the countryside and always found wood being burned....IF they could get it, because they had burned so much. The running joke amongst us mountain bikers was why don't we ever see any wild life when we ride??? Because they ate them.....all of them.


    Ok, I digress.
  19. WarmGuy

    WarmGuy Minister of Fire

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    I'd love to watch these guys stack the wood. Maybe it takes them a minute per log: "Should ve put dis one here?" "Nay, dat von ist 2 mm too vide."

    Actually, your pictures have inspired me to make my stacks neater:

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  20. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    I'd like to know how you guys all avoid the random shape peices that screw up the pile. I'd say 1/4 of the peices are not 16" length like I shoot for, some have knots, are short, or odd shaped for a bunch of different reasons... (Many of those reasons have something to do with freakin elm).

    I guess if I cut and split nothing but soft maple and ash my piles could look like that but in the real world of the scrounger piles that look like those are not reality.

    Just ask hardwood ---- or I should say... his neighbor. (Sorry Steve I could't resist)
  21. DiscoInferno

    DiscoInferno Minister of Fire

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    My logs are all sorts of lengths from 8-20". I used to stack long on the bottom and short on the top, like a pyramid. This works OK, but it doesn't allow maximum packing density (which most here aren't looking for anyway). This year I'm trying something different; on a 48" wide pallet I'll stack one row of around 16-20", one row of 12-16", and one row of 8-12". This seems to work pretty well. Might not get the best airflow, but I'm close to getting two years ahead on wood.

    The weird-shaped splits, I try to stick on top, or match to an inversely weird piece.
  22. drewmo

    drewmo Feeling the Heat

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    A woodpile with a view, taken in Vacheresse, France. This wood is stacked in the middle of a field with nothing around it, which I assume is meant for it to season quicker. In this shot, you're looking due south, so it will surely get some good sun.

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  23. Harley

    Harley Minister of Fire

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    I'll say... great pic. Seem to be a pretty good length there, and also no bark? Looks like it was dried and then stacked there???
  24. drewmo

    drewmo Feeling the Heat

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    A woodpile and car park all in one. The first time I saw this there was actually a car parked inside. For those with limited space on your lot, here's a solution. I think I found this in Rond, France, somewhere near Les Gets.

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  25. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Awesome pics drewmo . You keep us well covered. ;-)
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