1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Woodstock Soapstone Progress Hybrid Stove

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Kruegerw, Jul 30, 2012.

  1. binko

    binko Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2011
    Messages:
    129
    How can you run the stove with the cooktop removed. The smoke will come thru the seams between the stones?

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Machria

    Machria Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
    Messages:
    1,114
    Loc:
    Brookhaven, Long Island
    I think with no cooktop, you get one large piece of stone instead of 3... But I'm just guessing...
  3. siddfynch

    siddfynch New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2012
    Messages:
    34
    Loc:
    Southcentral AK
    Thanks for the pics, very helpful. oh, and nice job on that hearth.
  4. Cross Cut Saw

    Cross Cut Saw Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2012
    Messages:
    404
    Loc:
    Boulder, CO
    If you don't have the cook top you get 3 stones with a thin heat shield below them. The stones are thicker and have rope gaskets inlaid into them to create a seal so no smoke comes out.

    They look exactly the same on top as it does with the cook top.
  5. Machria

    Machria Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
    Messages:
    1,114
    Loc:
    Brookhaven, Long Island
    Just finished making and installing a one of a kind "Progress Hybrid Soapstone Clock". Bought a 16" round pizza soapstone from Woodstock, and fabricated a mantle clock out of it. It weighs about 20 lbs, so I had to use a serious hangman mount. Glued on some wooden numbers and painted them black, put lag bolts thru at each # spot, and painted the heads black. The 2 and 10 bolts actually are thru bolted to the mount.

    Clock Finished1.JPG
  6. HotCoals

    HotCoals Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2010
    Messages:
    3,075
    Loc:
    Rochester,Ny.
    Pretty fancy there mister..I like it!
  7. melissa71

    melissa71 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2012
    Messages:
    68
    Loc:
    Chicagoland
    That turned out fantastic! I love it! What kind of tiles are those in yourhearth and surround? They're beautiful.
  8. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Messages:
    6,156
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    Looking at the two items placed atop the stove, I figure the one on the left is a steamer, although clearly equipped with far more gadgetry than mine (got a pic?). What's the thing on the right, though?
  9. melissa71

    melissa71 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2012
    Messages:
    68
    Loc:
    Chicagoland
    It's a fan for circulating the heat. I've thought about getting one, but am too cheap. ;) The blades turn from the heat, so you don't need power to run it.
  10. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Messages:
    6,156
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    I see it now! Thanks, Melissa.
  11. siddfynch

    siddfynch New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2012
    Messages:
    34
    Loc:
    Southcentral AK
    Mine arrived yesterday. Sitting in back of truck in Mystery Box until I can install next week. Is it best to move the whole crate onto the exact final spot on my hearth before tearing apart the crate and assembling the legs, etc?
  12. Machria

    Machria Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
    Messages:
    1,114
    Loc:
    Brookhaven, Long Island
    Thank you. The tile, actually "stone" is called Silver Slate. It's simply a polished slate tile 1/2" thick, and it's very heavy. The back of them looks exactly like a regular peice of slate as you would put outside on your walkway... amazing what a difference it makes when they polish it.

    Left one is a steamer, pretty neat, the steam comes out of the campfire on it: http://www.amazon.com/Adirondack-Chair-Stove-Steamer-Black/dp/B007JXWXKQ/ref=pd_sim_sbs_hg_1
    [​IMG]


    Right one as noted is the ECO fan which runs itself off of the heat, it makes no noise and actually moves a fair amount of air: http://www.woodlanddirect.com/Wood-Stove-and-Accessories/Wood-Stove-Fans/Ecofan-UltrAir
    [​IMG]



    Sid, oh the wait!! I had it sitting in the back of my truck for a week also, it hurt to look at the box and not be able to open it! ;) You should leave it in the create as long as you can during the move. If the entire box doesn't fit, then you can remove the top part of the box/crate if you must, and leave the bottom part of the crate to grab it with a handtruck... We uncrated mine a few feet in front of the hearth. Then lifted it with a fancy handtruck and dropped it into place very carefully while measuring to make sure it was correct. You can see how we "moved it", still in the box/crate here: http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/750lbs-3-stories-no-problem-progress-hyrbrid-install-pics.101580/

    There is a good video of how to remove the final peices of the pallet on youtube:


    Good luck. Your going to love the stove.
  13. Waulie

    Waulie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Messages:
    1,010
    Loc:
    Nothern Lower Michigan
    Also, try to bring it in at least 24 hours before you build your first seasoning fire so the cast and stones aren't cold.
  14. Machria

    Machria Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
    Messages:
    1,114
    Loc:
    Brookhaven, Long Island
    Great point. When we brought mine in, those sones were cold for 6 or 8 hours. Just like it holds the heat, it also holds the cold!
  15. Machria

    Machria Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
    Messages:
    1,114
    Loc:
    Brookhaven, Long Island
    I had my first really bad burn last night. I loaded a decent size load (about 1/2 full), with 2 med splits, and 4 small splits (small 2 or 3" rounds). I loaded it at 11pm onto a pretty large and hot coal bed. I shut the air down to about 1/8th open and closed the bypass after only about 3 or 4 minutes. The wood was very dry, and took off before I even had the door shut. About 1 hour later (around midnight), the secondaries were blazing al the way across on all 4 rows, and the stove was hotter than I normally have it running (pipe got up to about 350-375). I check the stove again at 8am, and it was already almost cold, at 140*, with almost no lit coals left, just a larger than normal ash bed left over. I would have needed a super cedar in there to re-start. The hosue was still nice and warm, but man that was a fast burn. It really makes a huge difference on the size of the splits loaded, and how hot the coal bed is.
  16. Cross Cut Saw

    Cross Cut Saw Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2012
    Messages:
    404
    Loc:
    Boulder, CO
    I've seen someone selling soapstone ice cubes online!

    You freeze them and then put them in your whiskey and it doesn't water it down...
  17. Waulie

    Waulie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Messages:
    1,010
    Loc:
    Nothern Lower Michigan
    That would only be a bad burn if it wasn't nice and cold out! If it is cold, put more wood in and you'll still have nice coals after 12 hours. If it is warmish out, burn the coals down a bit before loading the half load. With super dry wood and a ton of coals, it can be tough to burn real low.
  18. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Messages:
    6,156
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    I reserve the small splits for the after work evening fire, when I want to burn fast to get the house heated back up and have it burn out inside of 3 - 4 hours, so I can then load the big splits for the overnight load.

    Got 'em... mostly a gimmick, but they were a gift. I do occasionally use them, if I plan to be nursing a glass (Balvenie or McCallan) to matter.
  19. Slow1

    Slow1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,663
    Loc:
    Eastern MA
    I'm curious about your stove top temps during that burn. I don't know my pipe temps very well as I have double wall and although I do keep track of the surface temp (it runs about 160-180 most of the time) I don't have a probe. However, what you describe (including having a warm home) is about what I would expect from each of my burns. Perhaps it is all down to my split sizes...
  20. Machria

    Machria Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
    Messages:
    1,114
    Loc:
    Brookhaven, Long Island
    Slow, not sure what your asking? The stove ALWAYS heats well, I never have a problem with that, in fact it's way overkill for my room, but that is a good thing I think. I just make smaller fire and/or open some windows if we are baking.

    What I meant by "bad burn" was it was much shorter that I expected or have been getting. I get overnight 8 to 12hour burns without trying. I have yet to load this stove up.

    My stove to is usually around 300 when the stove is cranking. I did not check for that "bad" burn
  21. Slow1

    Slow1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,663
    Loc:
    Eastern MA
    I was asking what the stovetop temps were during that particular burn. I'm curious to know if they are the same as I typically get - i.e. in the 350 range for the majority of the time with a spike to 550 on occasion (measured on the cast iron to the right of the flue exit - vertical flue here).

    And I agree - I too am getting great heat from the stove even if my normal burns sound more like your 'bad' one, but all in all it seems I'm burning wood at about the same rate as I did with the FV and the house is warmer...
  22. Machria

    Machria Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
    Messages:
    1,114
    Loc:
    Brookhaven, Long Island
    Gotcha, I wasn't monitoring the temp that night.

    On another note, the stove just scared the bejesus out of us, I loaded it with 2 spirits and 3 or 4 small chunks/uglies on top. Chared them for a few minutes and they took off big time, so I closed the bypass and shut the air all the way down. The fire quickly went down, with some light secondaries, and about 1/2 hour later it was dark, just some red hot spots on the bottom of the pile burning.... About 20 min's later we had a loud "puuuuuufff", and the firebox was like a gas chamber in hell! It was pretty loud, not just like a normal gas light off, this was a big one. Woke my wife up, sleeping on the couch. I noticed the pipe temp was a lot higher than or,al, up around 450 which I rarely hit. I did not see any smoke come out anywhere, but I did smell a bit of wood smell afterward.

    These puffs/small explosions really, normal and occur often...?
  23. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2009
    Messages:
    1,324
    Loc:
    Central Va
    It happens. . .not sure how often in the PH.
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/progress-backpuff.80000/

    If you want it to happen less often, don't shut the air down so much. Leave more flame in the firebox to prevent gas buildup.
  24. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    1,920
    Loc:
    southern ontario
    Yes, after you completely close the air, immediately just barely crack it open.

    A good puff can make the entire pipe/chimney assembly rattle. Not fun.
  25. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Messages:
    6,156
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    After complaining about my own back puffing woes, I received replies and PMs from a few PH owners, that they've had the same trouble. Perhaps this stove is very prone to back puffing.

Share This Page