1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Woodstove Summer Maintenance

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Thor, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. Thor

    Thor New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2013
    Messages:
    18
    Loc:
    Central Pa
    Cold snap behind us ( 60 forecast for Wednesday ) I was thinking ahead on how to close up stove this summer. This is my first stove with secondary tubes. I was thinking that they could rust real easy in the off season and was wondering if anyone applies anything to the tubes or any other metal surfaces ? Any other tips for closing her down for the season would also be appreciated. Thanks

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. topoftheriver

    topoftheriver Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2013
    Messages:
    238
    Loc:
    Northeast
    I am very familiar with your stove and they are among the good ones. My personal experience of more than 10 years with the tubes suggest that they do not rust. I have not experienced in Southcoast, Massachusetts or in Central Maine. The Maine stove is used mostly in November through March and is idle for the rest of the year. No rust problems. I believe the tubes are stainless but I am not sure what material other manufacturers are using. In short, I don't touch the tubes at all. Just a good clean out at the end of the season.
  3. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,501
    Loc:
    Central Michigan
    Not a lot is necessary other than a good cleaning. As I understand cleaning the chimney is wise at the end of the season instead of waiting for the begining of the following season because any crud left inside could potentionally be a moisture collector or corrosive. Not sure this is true but it seems to be a good practice. Tubes inside the stove are stainless so less likely to rust but stainless steel is only stain resistant so keep that in mind. I let mine cool for weeks and then shovel out everything and may even vaccuum although not necessary. I just like to inspect all the bricks and baffles. If there is any concern for critters coming in a cold stove from the top side(this happens) just block off the stove pipe with a balloon or similar or even stuffing a bunch of plastic grocery bags up there but place a note inside the stove that they are there so you do not attempt to fire it up before removing it.

    Others may have more tips and tricks as well but this is what I have done. Stoves are rather simple machines so little maintenance is required other than a little cleaning and inspection.
  4. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    14,917
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    I just clean it up . . . sweep the chimney . . . give it a complete vacuum cleaning (several days after the fire has gone out) . . . sometimes I put a box of baking soda inside the fire box . . . or sometimes during the summer I put a candle inside and light it when the draft is reversed and I smell smoke or creosote in the home.
  5. topoftheriver

    topoftheriver Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2013
    Messages:
    238
    Loc:
    Northeast
    Does the baking soda help? Haven't tried it yet!
  6. PLAYS WITH FIRE

    PLAYS WITH FIRE Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    Messages:
    639
    Loc:
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    I clean mine real well, sweep the stack, and put a peanut can of cat litter in the center. Someone on here mentioned that it can help with moisture and since year one I've used it. Does it make a difference....don't know but there is no rust and the stove smells fresh.
  7. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    14,917
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    Seems to . . . moisture never really seems to be too much of an issue though. I figure it can't really hurt things.
  8. bag of hammers

    bag of hammers Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2010
    Messages:
    1,168
    Loc:
    Northern ON
    3rd year with EPA stove and so far have just done what others here already advised (a good cleaning in the spring at the end of the burning season). The tubes I believe are stainless - they are still in great shape (hope they stay that way - I think I saw them selling on a parts site for @ $50 each if I recall - ouch...).
  9. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,692
    Loc:
    WNY
    We did the same as above-got the flue swept, cleaned the stove out real good and just left it. I did burn candles in it some nights, but I'll admit that it was more for the ambiance than to reverse the draft or take care of moisture! Ia lso cleaned the grates on the blower real well, and reseasoned the cast iron steamer that sits on the step top. Cleaned and polished the vintage brass tools and refilled the wood box so it didn't sit there empty, cleaned out all the little bits and pieces from it first though.
  10. topoftheriver

    topoftheriver Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2013
    Messages:
    238
    Loc:
    Northeast
    Take good care of your stove to avoid costly replacement and sometimes difficult installation of pricey parts. As for the tubes, all of my stoves have done well and so far never had to replace any;;;;;;;; yet!
  11. gerry100

    gerry100 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    Messages:
    504
    Loc:
    NY Capitol Region
    All good stuff here.

    +1 on sweeping the chimney in the spring. I do it so I'm ready for shoulder season in the fall on short notice.

    I also leave a note so I remember it's done. Besides , I may be too old to do it in the fall

Share This Page