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Work bench

Post in 'The Gear' started by smokinj, Feb 20, 2010.

  1. Mmaul

    Mmaul Minister of Fire

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    I looking bench J, when you building one for me?

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  2. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    dont you see you seat right there on the right? still need to mount grinder and vise lights...
  3. Mmaul

    Mmaul Minister of Fire

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    Looks nice, Lots of room.
  4. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Its 8ft x 33 in. top and two shelves. The top shelve is 15 in. x 8 ft
  5. TreePapa

    TreePapa Minister of Fire

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    Solid core doors make nice workbench tops, can sometimes be found free / cheap on C/L. Really freakin' sturdy, but you gotta have room for a 3 ft. deep bench.

    I have a drafting table top (about 1" thick) in my garage waiting to become the top of a freestanding work-table. Soon as I scrounge up 4x4 for the legs and decent 2x4 for the rest of the framing. And time to build it.

    Peace,
    - Sequoia
  6. John_M

    John_M Minister of Fire

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    smokin, Well done on the bench! Good looking, practical and strong with nice proportions. MMaul even wants you to build one for him. When your friends see it they will say things like "Aw c'mon, smokin, help me build a bench like yours, please. I'll be good. I'll be nice and will even help you cut, split, haul, and stack wood, I promise".

    The top shelves are a good idea and you kept them shallow enough so they do not interfere with using the bench top to its fullest potential. Ya' done good! John_M
  7. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    ok John any good tips on lighting going to do that sunday? (chain grinder mounted)
  8. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    If the bench will be in an unheated space, you won't want fluorescent bulbs. They don't like the cold and you probably won't like the flicker. Incandescent bulbs need to be "rough service" to stand up to vibrations. Look for them sometimes packaged as trouble light, garage door opener, or ceiling fan bulbs as they are designed to take the vibration. Trouble light bulbs may also have a coating to hold the glass together if they break. You should have cages over the bulbs in case you hit the bulb so that you don't electrocute yourself with the exposed wires. My electrical inspector called me on that.
  9. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    its heated more of a man cave than garage we use it for x-mass partys and get together's....shop if you will.
  10. John_M

    John_M Minister of Fire

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    smokin, I use 18" single lamp flourescent fixtures mounted on the under side of the shelves - one lamp each 32" of shelf. In my situation, all lamps are hard wired and controlled by one switch at each bench. With each lamp having its own on/off switch I am able to burn as many or as few as needed. These under shelf flourescent fixtures provide "okay" light. Not good. Not bad. Just okay. Longer fixtures might provide more light but might also interfere with access to electric outlets, etc. My favorite light, and the one I use most often is one of the gooseneck/swivel fixtures with a 100 watt bulb. This clamps to the top of the workbench. The design allows me to adjust the light to various angles and heights and even move it to another part of the bench if needed. The 100 watt lamp provides ample light for even the finest detail work - like removing tiny splinters. I have both types of fixtures at my work benches. If I had to recommend only one type of fixture it would be the gooseneck/swivel variety. This type allows me to see the splinter and look fully inside the oil and fuel chambers of my saws to check fluid levels when working in the shop.

    Workbench lighting seems to be a series of compromises. One wants enough light to work safely and without eye strain but also without burning too much electricity or having to frequently replace expensive burned out lamps. Good luck. John_M

    Edit: LLigetfa is right about flourescents lamps in an unheated space. The coldest temps in either of my workshops is about 40 °F and the flourescents seem to work okay (without flickering) at this temp. The temps in his area of Canada probably average just a few degrees lower than where I am in upstate NY. I would think the gooseneck/swivel type of fixture would be excellent for use around your new bench mounted chain sharpener.
  11. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    thats funny john just spoke with a another guy that said the very same thing (about the goose neck) amazing how much thought you have put in to this thanks again your dead on target throwing darts if you will....the whole plan what I will roll with.
  12. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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  13. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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  14. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Mine is not the one shown, I just googled for a pic. You need to try before you buy as they are all different. Mine has too short a focal point, so the work needs to be a couple of inches from the lens. Probably couldn't get it close enough to what you want to be in focus. Mine doesn't have the dust cover either.
  15. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    seems like the 1.5 focus would give the best shot of pulling it off on the grinder, and if it doesn't work the light will still be good and the magnifing would come into play on other project's Its a 2fer...
  16. John_M

    John_M Minister of Fire

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    LLigetfa, I have always wanted a magnifying versions of the articulating arm fixture but have never "just done it". And, thanks for the heads up on the focal range of those magnifiers. That is one of the features I will consider when purchasing this fixture come spring/summer. If available, a 8" to 9" focal length might be long enough that the lens does not interfere with the use of tools. John_M
  17. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Done! Thank you for all the help all the chains are fresh and ready to go....John m, lligetfa,Kevin J,Mmaul,Wahoowad,Paul,TreePapa........its set up perfect

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  18. John_M

    John_M Minister of Fire

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    smokin, I'm jealous! The bench looks great. You deserve to be proud ot the finished product. After LLigetfa's suggestion and the excellence of your installation, I am going to have to get me one of those articulating fixtures w/magnifier-very practical. I might need a couple of those adjustable height swivel chairs, also. Good luck. John_M
  19. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Thanks john its mostly your design the under lights are 21 in.... the mag. is sweet I will take a pic of it on a cutter it awesome..very clear looking through it from a pretty good distance maybe in the 2 foot range..

    (all the wires have be ran the right way now)
  20. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Pic. shot through the MAG.

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  21. John_M

    John_M Minister of Fire

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    Great photo through the magnifier, smokin. Clarity of detail is much better than I would have expected. I've never used a machine chain sharpener but from the photo, yours seems to be adjusted very accurately. There appears to be no "witness mark" or "lubber line" on the cutter tooth. Is there one I just cannot see? Now you've made me start thinking about a digital camera. But that purchase needs to wait a while. John_M
  22. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    "no “witness mark” or “lubber line” "on the cutter tooth. Is there one I just cannot see? Not sure what your saying there?
  23. John_M

    John_M Minister of Fire

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    smokin, Some chain manufacturers today have about a 3/16" very shallow line cut into the top of every cutter on their chain. This line shows the angle (usually 30 or 35 degrees) to hold the file when sharpening the cutter. This witness mark also shows when constant sharpenening has removed as much of the cutter as allowed and the chain must be replaced. You can sharpen as much as you want right up to the witness mark. Then discard the chain.

    "Lubber line" is a nautical expression and refers to a line (usually white in color) on the globe of a ship's compass. It is used to accurately read bearings (direction of travel) on the compass. In nautical usage, a "landlubber" is a clumsy or inexperienced sailor. Some would say only a landlubber would need a "lubber line" to properly read a compass. I use the term "lubber line" because it is more familiar to me than "witness mark". I've never known others to use "lubber line" to describe the "witness mark" on a saw chain. I hope my explanation has clarified rather than confused the use of these terms. I am of the impression that one of our moderators is a retired ships Captain. Perhaps he will add some clarity to my confusing explanation. Good luck. John_M
  24. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    now I am with you there is a lot of meat left on that chan its a full comp rs chain I will look closer tonight but dont rember one being there.
  25. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Its a "woodland pro chain" they dont have the mark on them I thought it was a rs

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