Workbench Height

thewoodlands Posted By thewoodlands, Sep 13, 2010 at 1:43 PM

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  1. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands
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  2. jeff_t

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  3. blel

    blel
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    Typical kitchen counter is 36". Works pretty good as bench height.
     
  4. fossil

    fossil
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    I like 36" for a general purpose workbench. I can work comfortably standing (which I normally do), or I can pull my stool up and sit if I feel like it. I just got a new wooden stool, which is 30"...that's a bit high, so I'll cut 2" or so off the legs and see how it feels, then take another inch or so until I get it just right for me. Disclaimer has to be that I built my workbench about 30 years ago, so I'm pretty well accustomed to its height. :lol: Rick
     
  5. Tarmsolo60

    Tarmsolo60
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    I'm 6' and have always built mine at 40". I would think anywhere between 36" and 40" would work fine.
     
  6. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands
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    Tarmsolo60 I was in the garage tonight cleaning the air filters on the chainsaws plus the chainsaws themselves with the air compressor then did some filing on both saws. After I was done I measured on the wall the height for the work bench at 36 inches it did seem low, how do you like 40 and what type of work do you do on your work bench?

    zap
     
  7. Tarmsolo60

    Tarmsolo60
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    Zap,
    I don't really do any woodworking on the bench, I'm more of a take apart and fix things guy, clean guns, general things like that. I'm on my third shop and I've built them all at 40".

    Jack
     
  8. heatwise

    heatwise
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    mine is at 35'' at 5'11 it works for me. i made the legs from 6x6 so its sturdy and stable. the top is walnut and the front face is hard maple. pete
     
  9. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands
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    I'm going with 4x4 for the legs, sides,back and front face will be 2 x 6 with a one inch thick plywood for the top.

    zap
     
  10. Cutter

    Cutter
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    I have my woodworking benches about 33 ft long rather low 34" Woodworking demands lots of downward pressures. My mech. bench sits higher at 38". With the vice setting above it about another 7". Mech work seems to involve more twisting and turning motions. My Lapidary bench sits at 42" with the center of my wheels 5" above that. This puts the grinding and polishing right in my face and accommodates a stool when needed. I seem to remember that watch makers benches were also quite high. For one bench, I choose adjustable. Oh yea I am 6'0"
     
  11. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands
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    I thank everyone for the input, the height will be between 40 inches.


    zap
     
  12. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands
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    Cutter I started making the bench tonight, the legs are 38.5, the depth for the table top is 24 inches and the bottom plywood (3/4)shelve is 22.5. I put the 2 x 6 for the front on the inside so I'm not banging my shins against it , length of table is 72 inches.

    I should finish Thursday night also I'm thinking of some pegboard on the wall behind the table.

    zap
     

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  13. Corey

    Corey
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    To me, it kind of depends on what you want to do. If doing a lot of 'fine' work....assembling small parts and pieces, working on small assemblies, etc I like to have a bench a bit taller, or something which can be set at comfortably and have the parts close at hand. If you're doing a bunch of 'heavy' work...belt sanding, drilling, hammering, etc, then I like a bench which is a little lower so you can lean over and exert more force. A compromise might be a little lower bench for the heavy stuff, but with a spot to slide a good chair under so you are 'up close' for any fine work.
     
  14. Beetle-Kill

    Beetle-Kill
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    Cozy heat, good answer! The work you do may dictate the required height. If cleaning saws and re-building transmisions(or whatever) one height may be fine. But if you need the bench for fine work, and you may use a chair for extended periods of time, a different height may be in order. I think, @6'1", you're on the right track for your "Go-to" work bench. Looking forward to seeing it complete. JB
     
  15. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands
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    Looking to put a vise on this workbench, any ideas on the placement or what type of vise.


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  16. loon

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  17. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands
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    Cool dog, never enough room either. I see from some of your other post your dog likes riding on the four wheeler, we need a picture of your dog with a helmet.

    I see you live in Ontario is it near Massena, New York or the St. Lawrence River?

    zap
     
  18. loon

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    ya we have fun with them..

    about 1/2 hour from the St. Lawrence River bridge.
     
  19. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands
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    Alot of nice land was lost on the Canadian side when the seaway was built, watch some video with a apple farmer losing all his land.

    I found this site one night, http://www.lostvillages.ca/en/index.html

    zap
     
  20. Battenkiller

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  21. Georgiadave

    Georgiadave
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    A right handed person usually likes the vise on the left side of the bench. Tools on the bench can be picked up with the right hand. The opposite for left handers. A lot depends on whether you have access to either side.

    With a swive vise, position the vise on the corner so that in one direction long objects will pass in front of the bench, swivel to the side and the bench supports items in the vise jaws.

    The old USA make vises are far superior to the imports most sell today. Wilton, Reed, Starrett, Columbian come to mind. I think there are Sites for vises that have more information. Craigslist is a good source, along with yard sales and estate sales.
     
  22. John_M

    John_M
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    Georgiadave +1.
    My favorite vise is the Wilton 6 1/2 inch heavy-duty "tradesman". It is heavy, strong, swivels, but very expensive.
    Re: mounting the vise, I mount all my vises directly on top of a leg (corner is best). You will often be hammering something on the vise's anvil. You want the impact of the hammer to be directed in a straight line to the material, down the leg of the bench to the concrete floor. This way the piece you are hammering will receive the full force of the impact. Mounting the vise between the legs will often result in the impact of the hammer being absorbed by top of the bench rather than the workpiece to concrete floor sequence. Good luck!
     
  23. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands
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    Georgiadave thanks for the info, I never thought about the right and left handed thing. We will see if I can find a good old vise made in the U.S.A.




    zap
     
  24. nate379

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    I am right handed and have always put the vice on the right side.

    As for height, mine is somewhere around 32". I am 5 11" I had it at 36" and it was way too tall when I had to work on something clamped in the vice
     
  25. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone
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    Comfortable height depends on handtool or powertool usage also. I like handtools and like mine below 33 inches. It gives me more leverage with a plane and makes chisel work more comfortable too.

    Matt
     
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