Worst wood to chainsaw??

Cedrusdeodara Posted By Cedrusdeodara, Dec 7, 2008 at 2:48 AM

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  1. bigdog

    bigdog
    New Member

    Dec 11, 2008
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    Loc:
    W PA
    Agreed. I cut 2 truckloads of it today. Chain is gonna need some attention tommorrow.
     
  2. jeffman3

    jeffman3
    New Member

    Nov 20, 2007
    320
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    Loc:
    S.W. Nebraska
    I've never cut black locust but I have cut honey locust. That was tough stuff but my vote goes to old dry elm. It acts like the bark (if there is any left) almost always is loaded with sand, dirt, and grit, sometimes even gravel. You can't keep it out of your chain. and I am lucky to get a pickup load cut before I have to change to a sharp chain.
     
  3. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
    Minister of Fire

    Jul 22, 2008
    17,138
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    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    Wood with barbed wire fencing embedded in it . . . :) ;)

    On a more serious note . . . on wood that I occasionally cut . . . apple.
     
  4. boogieman

    boogieman
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    Sep 15, 2008
    13
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    Loc:
    Southeast Iowa
    Not that I use it for burning (O.K. I tried a few sticks but don't tell my wife) but my wife got a big pallet of mahogany scraps at a window manufacturers auction. She is going to do woodworking with it, but anyways it cuts really hard! It is almost like cutting metal with my chop saw.
     
  5. BJ64

    BJ64
    Minister of Fire

    Jul 24, 2008
    617
    6
    Loc:
    NE Oklahoma
    Where I live still has many of those old post still in place. There is one run of fence that may still have the wire from 1894 - the year they set the roads in this Indian territory. The old post are all but gone. From what is left I suspect they are old hedgeapple.

    There was a guy from Colorado who set up shop in the parking lot of a local business about 10 years ago. Folks would bring him logs and he would carve bears, birds, and what ever. He was one of those cocky guys that had a knack of irritating the heck out of us. One day my buddy asked him if he could carve any kind of wood.

    "If you can get it here I can carve it - $100 bill."

    "Big 10-4 dude - we will be back. We want a horse head made."

    There was a hedge tree we killed by spraying it a few years before. The roots kept choking off the septic line. It took a while but we managed to extract about 6 foot of trunk 18 inches across. We used a tractor to load the thing.

    When we rolled it off the truck for the guy it did not even bounce. We could watch the progress on this project daily. It took a week. Needless to say that put a damper on the cockyness.
     
  6. smokinj

    smokinj
    Minister of Fire

    Aug 11, 2008
    15,981
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    Loc:
    Anderson, Indiana
    hedge has away of doing that to people!
     
  7. BJ64

    BJ64
    Minister of Fire

    Jul 24, 2008
    617
    6
    Loc:
    NE Oklahoma
    Aint that the truth.
     
  8. GaryS

    GaryS
    Member

    Nov 21, 2008
    80
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    Loc:
    Central MO
    I used to hate cutting black jack when I was a kid. The trunk - which is more like black oak isn't so bad - it's just all those damned dead hard branches. I don't think it's a very widespread tree though. Folks around western missouri or oklahoma probably know more about it.

    I've qot quite a bit of osage around the house. Been trying to kill a bunch of the crap behind the house for over a year. Makes a darn good thorn thicket if it gets out of control.
     
  9. Cedrusdeodara

    Cedrusdeodara
    Member

    Dec 3, 2008
    146
    6
    Loc:
    New Jersey
    Hey Garys,

    By Black Jack, do you mean Blackjack Oak (Quercus marilandica)? I've never cut that, in fact I rarely see decent stands of it near me in the pine barren area of southern NJ. We are in the "native tract" for that species of oak, but it doesn't seem to take over like other species. Just a sprinkle here and there.

    Cool looking Oak though, very distinctive glossy, clover-like leaves. Doesn't seem to be a big grower compared to others in the red-oak family. Elementary school teachers near us love to put that as an extra credit on the leaf location/identification assignment becasue it is rather hard to find compared to the more common genus and species of trees.


    Brian
     
  10. GaryS

    GaryS
    Member

    Nov 21, 2008
    80
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    Loc:
    Central MO
    Yes, I think so. Very similar to red oak. Doesn't get real big. Inside rots out pretty fast. Always easy to split by hand.
     
  11. Outdoorsman

    Outdoorsman
    New Member

    Jan 6, 2008
    65
    0
    Loc:
    Mi.
    Of the trees I've cut I'd rate Osage & Hickory as the hardest on chains.

    I've not cut some of the the others that seem to be getting named several times like Black Locust & Ironwood. I've cut Honey Locust however & it's no way as hard as Hickory or Osage.

    Just the name Ironwood would lead you to think it would raise heck with your gear.
     
  12. ccwhite

    ccwhite
    Member

    Oct 14, 2008
    238
    0
    Loc:
    Steubenville, OH
    I have to agree with a bunch of the guys who've said good dry seasoned Black Locust (or as we call it around here "organic steel"). My saw is in the basement right now needing attention from my last go-round with some a couple days ago. I'll touch it up again and get out there and hit it again in the next couple days.
     
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