Would this be a big no-no?

SnapCracklePop Posted By SnapCracklePop, Dec 7, 2010 at 10:34 PM

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  1. SnapCracklePop

    SnapCracklePop
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 29, 2010
    269
    1
    Loc:
    Southwestern Penna
    Hi guys n gals,

    I am using a Pleasant Hearth wood stove in my basement, which also has a vent-free, 20,000 BTU LP heater about 20 feet away, in the same room.

    I have not done this and would not think of doing it unless and until an expert says it's OK, but...

    Can I light the pilot on the LP heater and let it kick on as needed when the wood fire is dying out? LP unit has electric ignition and a thermostat.

    The LP unit was new last year; I haven't used it much because of the cost of the LP.

    My main concern would be that the pilot light would go out and gas would accumulate and there would be this horrendous BOOM...

    Am I right to be nervous about this possibility?

    Note: I plan to move the LP heater to my dog kennel (96 sq ft) if it's not too big for the building. On lowest setting I think it would be ideal...
    That won't happen until spring, though, unless someone tells me to get the thing the heck outta here NOW.

    Thanks,
    Nancy
     
  2. Install fire 1

    Install fire 1
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 5, 2010
    159
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    Loc:
    Canada.
    I wouldnt.
    If there was a leak, lp is heavier than air, the stove will suck it right in.
    Propane hovers on the floor.
    The result you already know


    Adam
     
  3. SnapCracklePop

    SnapCracklePop
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 29, 2010
    269
    1
    Loc:
    Southwestern Penna
    OK, thanks. I'm not about to tempt fate...
     
  4. jtp10181

    jtp10181
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Feb 26, 2007
    3,729
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    Loc:
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    If the pilot goes out, any listed and tested product will have a safety switch/sensor to stop the flow of gas within a reasonable amount of time (usually 30 seconds).

    If there was a leak in the line before the gas valve that would be a whole other story.
     
  5. The Kirbster

    The Kirbster
    New Member 2.
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    Nov 18, 2010
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    NW AR
    Yeah, the stove is already there, I assume already hooked up...the biggest risk is already there, and has been for awhile. Unless you intend to unhook the LP stove, you might as well use it.
     
  6. Wood Heat Stoves

    Wood Heat Stoves
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Jun 12, 2009
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    Am I right to be nervous about this possibility?

    no, not nervous--healthy caution is ok though

    gas stoves are always a potential risk, you just have it installed and inspected by a pro if concerned with the quality of your own work

    for example, a light switch(ignition source) is in the room w/ every gas appliance i've ever installed. no boom yet :)
     
  7. Install fire 1

    Install fire 1
    Member 2.
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    Dec 5, 2010
    159
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    Canada.
    I am under the assumption that its a portable heater, not stove or fireplace?


    If its ventless, then i would still have concern, as a sealed DV unit would not run risk of leaking into the room.


    I'm in canada, so ventless fireplaces or stoves are not permitted here in a home.

    The have to be vented to the great outdoors.
     
  8. Wood Heat Stoves

    Wood Heat Stoves
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Jun 12, 2009
    1,905
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    oops, missed that part.
    i never, ever recommend any vent free appliances be used to actually heat your home. great shop heaters though
     
  9. SnapCracklePop

    SnapCracklePop
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 29, 2010
    269
    1
    Loc:
    Southwestern Penna
    Update: I have turned off the gas at the tank outside and do not plan to use the propane heater as long as there is a hot coal in the wood stove. I feel safer having done that.

    My plan for the propane heater is to move it to my small dog-boarding kennel (96 sq ft). For now, the kennel is heated by an oil-filled electric heater. I had some customers for three nights this past week, and the heater held temps at 54 deg F on a night when it got down to 12 deg F. The other nights, it easily kept the kennel at 58 to 60 on a lower setting with outside temps in the 20s. PA state law requires at least 50 deg F.

    If the propane heater is too much for the kennel, I can always move it to my garage... I'd like to have it in the kennel, though, so I can keep track of actual heating costs.

    Thanks for all your help. Bartender, a round of milk and cookies on me, please.

    Nancy
     
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