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Would this help to season wood faster?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by spadafore, Jan 22, 2009.

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  1. spadafore

    spadafore New Member

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    northwest ohio
    I wonder if putting some unseasoned wood splits behind my stove in a rack would speed up seasoning. I put a few splits behind the stove last night and monitored the temps with my digital thermometer gun. The peak temp of the wood was 187 degrees Fahrenheit. The only concern I would have is what temperature does wood ignite or even start to smoke. I poured water on the wood before I hit the sack and it hissed from the temp. What do you folks think?

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  2. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    I think pouring water on the wood would be counter-productive. You have to stay awake and keep watch.
  3. njtomatoguy

    njtomatoguy Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
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    Maple Shade, NJ
    I put the wood about 18 inches away from the stove,
    next to the hearth tile. I am burning seasoned stuff now,
    but as long as your minimum clearances are met, I cant see how it would hurt.
    I woke up a bunch of black spiders over the weekend, so that pile went back out into the carport.
  4. spadafore

    spadafore New Member

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    The wood I used as a test was pallet wood. It is kiln dried so pouring water on did nothing more than reduce the temp. to take away all worries. Yeah I have a carbon monoxide and smoke detecter in the same room as my stove. I find that the digital thermometer gun is a very useful tool as I bet some people don't really know how hot somethings might get around the stove. 150 degrees is pretty warm to the touch but doesn't burn my hand. I would have to think that wood would not smoke untill 300 degrees or so.


    FWIW Q: What temperature does a normal
    A: Measurements made in several oak log fires indicated that the maximum temperature of the fire (in the crevice between the logs) was 900°F to 1200°F and that the gas just outside the flame envelope was 200°F to 400°F. A temperature of 900°-1200°F is barely the ignition temperature of the volatiles and results in their slowest reaction rates. Temperatures of 200°-400°F are cool enough to stop any combustion reaction.
  5. Bubbavh

    Bubbavh Feeling the Heat

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    Oct 22, 2008
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    475
    Loc:
    NJ Piney
    Wrap your logs in a sham-wow... If they work like the commercial you can dry all your wood in just minutes!
  6. bambam

    bambam Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
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    Loc:
    south/central Pa
    A friend of mine has a wood stove in his basement which is where he also kept his chainsaws and other equipment he uses to cut wood. He loaded the stove up for overnight and he woke up to the smoke alarm and a couple thousand dollars of damage to his house. I would not take the chance.
  7. johnsopi

    johnsopi Minister of Fire

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    MD near DE&PA;
    What burned?
  8. bambam

    bambam Member

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    The stove got hot enough to ignite the chainsaws gas tank and that is what started the fire that went up through his floor and started burning the the first floor of his home.
  9. wellbuilt home

    wellbuilt home Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2008
    Messages:
    532
    Loc:
    NY
    I have 2 wood racks one tall rack that sits next to the stove 10" away . The wood sits for 24hrs to help dry it. The other rack is to burn now . I move the wood from one rack to the other every day . It helps .
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