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Would you buy black locust green

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Mike821, Dec 9, 2010.

  1. Mike821

    Mike821 Member

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    Hello all....Question? I am thinking about selling some locust that has been sitting for a year cut into 4' logs some 1-2' wide.. The wood is 23-24 % moisture. Would this wood be dry for next fall's burning season? (I would tend to think so) I don't think this year burning would be good...or I can be wrong.

    If I sell it as is now green, would people buy it..cut and split. What can I expect to get for a cord?

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  2. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Price it right and you could sell it all day long, every day. Black locust is a great fuel. 23% is burnable, but not ideal. C/S/S it wouldn't take too long to bring it to the 20% magic zone.
  3. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Cut split and sell it...post your moisture content...23-24 Not bad!
  4. Mike821

    Mike821 Member

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    Can I brun this now at 23-24%? Would it be bad?
  5. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    A little lower MC would be better, but it will burn. Check your stack more frequently and brush as needed. Make sure to not smolder the fire.
  6. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

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    It'll burn fine, but getting it going may take a little extra care. Locust is harder to ignite than a lot of wood because it's so hard and dense. Cherry at 24% MC would burst into flame instantly, but locust will need a real good coal bed. FWIW I am burning locust that is about 26-28% MC and it burns great, just needs a real hot fire to get it going then it's off to the races. Got some in the stove right now and it's burning clean as a whistle and acting very angry. Stove top is at 700º.

    As far as price, at 23-24% MC, I'd call it a hell of a lot more seasoned than most of the stuff passing as seasoned these days. Are you going to deliver? If delivered, ask for $150-175 and you should have no complaints. You'll have some extra pocket money and somebody else will be getting a sweet deal.
  7. fsr4538

    fsr4538 New Member

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    You can sell black locust green, you can sell black locust red, you can sell black locust blue, just know you cant sell black locust black since you already burned it.

    :p
  8. cptoneleg

    cptoneleg Minister of Fire

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    I am keeping my home warm on Oak 24 to 28% mixed with dry stuff. I have been burnig 7/24 for about a month now Love my new stove.

    I know I will get bashed for burnig wood that green. But I am laid off and burnig to keep house warm keep Elect Bill down. I will probable shut it down in afew days and check and clean chimney.
  9. Mike821

    Mike821 Member

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    Thanks guys....man black locust smells when it burns...just put a few splits in. I opened the door to add another and whamo....that stink..lol. It does burn like a champ and is hard to start.
  10. ISeeDeadBTUs

    ISeeDeadBTUs Guest

    Before you waste your time cuttin and splittin, I'll just trade you some Aspen that you can burn immediatly.
  11. Mike821

    Mike821 Member

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    I have 4 cords burnable this year. Some of the Locust is 14-18% and is ready to rock this year.
  12. cptoneleg

    cptoneleg Minister of Fire

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    My Locust does not stink, I will post a picture of the locust we have tommorow, let me see what black looks like. Not sure what type I have.
  13. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    You can sell it if you wish but just go by what other sellers are asking for price.

    If you burn it, the best thing would be to mix in some fast starting wood that burns hot, like soft maple or even some cottonwood. That would ignite the locust to burn just fine. I would not load up the stove with it though at that moisture content.
  14. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

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    You could burn it now, however its a waste to do it. Its not ready. It only needs 6 mos to dry < 20%, then its among the best. I doubt anyone will buy bl for a premium if thats what your asking.
  15. WoodPorn

    WoodPorn Minister of Fire

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    I agree with this, but only because I don't think average Joe homeowner knows what it is or what it's capable of.
    I personally love the stuff, You could definitely sell it around here for anywhere between $190-250 which is a bit below avarage cord price for what the local jackwagons call seasoned!
  16. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

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    Mike, if you need dry wood, I am sure we could work out a trade. I'm in bedminster. Locust is my favorite.
  17. basswidow

    basswidow Minister of Fire

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    It's the bark - especially if theres still some moisture in it. Smells like greatful dead concert.

    I put a post on your other thread.

    Are you considering just selling the rounds? or selling it split?

    Split delivered black locust in NNJ should sell for $ 180 a cord or more. That's premo wood and doesn't sound like it's too far off on MC. All the vendors selling seasoned firewood are for the most part selling green.

    If you are just selling the rounds unsplit. I'd say $ 100 a cord is fair.

    Hope you can put some $$$ in your pocket. That's hard work - so don't sell it for the cheap. You've got gas, insurance, vehicle costs. Seriously, unless you are getting $ 300 a cord like they do in NE, I don't know how guys can make a living selling wood.
  18. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    Locust is pretty close to ready when it's fresh/green. I'd burn it today if it's been down a year.
  19. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

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    Somewhere I saw a chart that rated black locust as the best of all woods to burn green on a BTUs produced basis. Low moisture and incredible heat potential locked up in it. Hickory is better (barely) when seasoned, but it sucks when green.

    Most of the locust I've burned was years ago in a huge hot air furnace. I'd cut it down in the AM and be throwing huge rounds into the furnace by evening. I could get enormous pieces into that beast. It had an opening bigger than the mouth on Jaws, and those green locust rounds would light as soon as they touched the foot-deep coal bed. Whatever small amount of heat that was lost through evaporation was welcome with that thing. Less time spent with the windows and doors open hours later. :roll:
  20. Danno77

    Danno77 Minister of Fire

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    A guy's gotta do what a guy's gotta do. You recognize that it could be problematic and are taking precautions. nobody is going to bash you.
  21. modo

    modo New Member

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    I have never burned locust myself, but know a few around here that swear by it (black locust) Aren't the needles on those things like 4-6 in. long or more though.
  22. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Maybe it's just me . . . but I always thought black locust was a deciduous tree with leafs and not needles. Are you thinking of some other tree species?
  23. WoodPorn

    WoodPorn Minister of Fire

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    I would imagine he means the thorns that grow on them.
  24. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Ah, that makes sense . . . thorns.
  25. Thistle

    Thistle Minister of Fire

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    Black
    Locust has small thorns on the twigs & smaller branches that are rarely over 1/2" -3/4" long,if that much.Similar in size to the ones on Osage Orange.But much smaller than the huge ones that are often 2"-4" & in clusters on Honey Locust,its cousin.I've seen single thorns that are 4" long,that sometimes appear on lower trunk & larger branches.Thornless Honey Locust is a widely planted & beautiful shade tree,they look identical to the Honey Locust in the wild,just minus any thorns.I never turn down the chance to cut any locust,every few yrs I run across some that's free or the owner wants me to cut for them.Honey Locust is widespread & scattered across the Midwest,where Black Locust's natural growing range is a bit south & east of me.The only BL around here is what's been planted for shade & windbreaks in the past.

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