Yee-ha! (and tree ID)

Bootlegger Posted By Bootlegger, Nov 20, 2009 at 2:36 AM

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  1. Bootlegger

    Bootlegger
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    Aug 28, 2009
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    Where the Bluegrass meets Hills
    Two large trees, one uprooted and headed toward the house with only one tree holding it back. Another giant, double trunk, half dead and leaning toward the house. Got 'em both dropped for $400 today. Otherwise, free wood!
    4118500256_9bac6eff1a.jpg

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    Since I know everyone likes to play Name That Species, here are some close ups. I know the big one for sure, and I know from the leaves the genus of the other. Enjoy.
    The "big" one.
    4117726881_5922946389.jpg

    The "other" one.
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  2. JustWood

    JustWood
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    Aug 14, 2007
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    Last 2 R Ra Hed Maple! MMMMMMM HMMMMMMMMMM!!!
    Need closer pics of bark and grain of 1st tree to ID!!!!!!!!
     
  3. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck
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    Feb 26, 2009
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    I second the second ID - looks like red maple to me. The first one I am not sure about.
     
  4. Bootlegger

    Bootlegger
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    Aug 28, 2009
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    The other pics didn't turn out, there is some huge shadow in the way. I'll get one of the big 'un tomorrow in the daylight after the monster goes away:

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Bootlegger

    Bootlegger
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    Aug 28, 2009
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    I knew from the leaves it was Acer, and I do have lots of Acer rubrum. So its a "soft maple", does this mean it doesn't burn as well? Doesn't matter, I'll burn it.

    I figured the bigger tree would be harder to ID. I'll get some better closeups in the morning.
     
  6. PA. Woodsman

    PA. Woodsman
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    Feb 26, 2007
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    Not sure on the first one-Oak, Hickory perhaps. But I'm pretty certain that the second one is Silver Maple. Post a picture of the first one when you get it split up...
     
  7. smokinj

    smokinj
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    Aug 11, 2008
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    the frist one tulip or ash
     
  8. Hurricane

    Hurricane
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    Feb 18, 2009
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    First one I go with ash, second I agree with Maple.
     
  9. Bootlegger

    Bootlegger
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    Aug 28, 2009
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    Acer is correct for the second, though I don't know which one. Maple is prolific in my woods, though not long-lived. All the down trees are maple and poplar.

    But the big 'un is stumping y'all so far. It won't be split for a year, it will sit in log form on my pallet stack until next summer. That's wood for 2-3 years out.
    So here's some more pics, best I can do.
    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]

    Another hint:
    It's the dominant species on my west facing knob, though a forester friend tells me its rare to find it as the dominant species. Its not rare as a species, just usually not the most numerous on a site.
     
  10. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1
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    Oct 4, 2007
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    Chestnut Oak - more typical of a rocky forest/montainous area found often in conjunction with Hemlock [Oak-Hemlock forests are abundant enough int he northeast].
     
  11. gregp553

    gregp553
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    Nov 15, 2009
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    Big one looks like the oak I'm splitting. Tree guy says there are 40 varieties of oak. What do i know? Does it smell? My whole yard smells from my oak splits. Other one is a maple.
     
  12. gzecc

    gzecc
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    Sep 24, 2008
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    I second the chestnut oak. Should be beautiful wood if thats what it is. From a board perspective not firewood.
     
  13. Bootlegger

    Bootlegger
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    Aug 28, 2009
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    We have a winner! They outnumber my white oaks 2:1, with a handful of red and a few black oaks. No hemlock though lots of sassafras, maple and poplar. and there use to be a lot of cherry and cedar but that was taken decades ago and only now starting to come back. Very little ash, I've found only one. The oak and hickory dominate.
     
  14. Bootlegger

    Bootlegger
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    Aug 28, 2009
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    Do you think those trunks are big enough for saw logs? I have plenty of firewood, I could save the chestnut oak for the sawyer.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. FLINT

    FLINT
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    Dec 5, 2008
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    yeah, CT is right, your oak is definitely chestnut oak, for sure. Chestnut oak is a species of white oak, good wood. and yeah, that smaller one is a red maple.
     
  16. gzecc

    gzecc
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    Sep 24, 2008
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    They are very small, but I am a carpenter and probably would make a few board.
     
  17. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck
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    Feb 26, 2009
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    Chestnut Oak is a dominant species here in central PA on dry, acid-soil ridgetops, which means most of the ridgetops. It has a thicker bark than some of the other oaks around here, but the wood seems just as dense. Red Maple will burn very nicely. It isn't as dense as Sugar maple, but still a nice firewood. It seasons a lot faster than oak or hard maple, so should be nice and dry by next year if you need it.
     
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