Yet another chimney question.

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by HJsimpson, Jun 10, 2011.

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  1. HJsimpson

    HJsimpson
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    Burning Hunk

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    Hello everyone.
    Here is my dilema. The picture below is my current masonary block chimney with 7 X 11 clay liner. It is roughly 30 feet tall with about 1 1/2 feet below grade. My original plan was 6" insulated SS liner with T hookup. Now the problems begin. I planned on doing it myself since it seemed pretty straight forward but so far im unable to find any help. Plan B called for some qoutes and got 2, one for $4100.00 second for $3800.00 :bug: . Both said that did not include breaking tile if needed. They also wanted to use a 5.5" insulated liner which i not sure about. From all the information i can find this is not an extremely difficult job am i wrong? For that price i could possible run a new triple wall chimney but then i have problems with below grade exit.

    If i am way off on my figure's please feel free to tell me or any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I was at about $800 for insulated liner Plus an extre $75 for extended T because my foundation is 2 feet thick stone. Is there really $3000.00 dollars labor involved?
     

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  2. kingquad

    kingquad
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    I run 5.5 inch uninsulated on an interior chimney and have no problems at all. You appear to have plenty of height, so it shouldn't be a problem. I would definitely insulate with an exterior chimney. I don't know about installation cost, but if they have to bust out the tile then I would expect it to be pretty costly.
     
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  3. begreen

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  4. cmonSTART

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    Where is this liner terminating? Is it on the first floor? basement?

    Is the quote ONLY for running an insulated liner? No other repairs or masonry work? Is there an appliance included in that?

    A 5.5 inch wrapped liner is still going to be a pretty tight fit. While I'm not a fan of downsizing liners, it will probably work fine for you as long as its insulated.
     
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  5. begreen

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    Basement, tee at the foundation.
     
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  6. Fsappo

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    Our company would charge about $1000 labor to bust a tile and drop an insulated liner. Another $1500 or so in parts maybe. I would say you shouldnt be paying more than $3k parts, labor, tax.
     
  7. Todd

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    Sounds crazy high to me. I payed about that much for a total rebuild of the top 1/3 of my brick chimney, bust out old tiles, and pour a new Supaflue liner and seal up the whole works. http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/75136/

    A 5.5 insulated liner may still be a tight fit if there are any offset tile joints. The oval insulated liner Begreen suggested sounds like a good way to go.
     
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  8. HJsimpson

    HJsimpson
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    Burning Hunk

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    Yes the qoute was for insulated liner, tee, cap and installation with no tile removal. The ovalized liner looks great but what about the joints every 5 feet? What are the chances of them coming loose while cleaning?
    I just spent $8500.00 on a new roof so the added expense for the chimney is really hurting. As much as i hate it it may be next year before i get to upgrade the entire wood furnace and chimney. The current furnace uses a 8" flue and the new one will use a 6" so i cant change one without the other.
    Thanks everyone for all the input.
     
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  9. laynes69

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    Your setup was exactly like our setup. I ended up with a 5.5" rigid insulated liner. The rigid liner allowed for a easier fit. Our snout into the thimble was 32" deep so that was a fun hookup. Installing the liner section by section wasn't bad until the end when things got heavy and our jig broke. I installed ours myself and it was 32' tall. I used vermiculite for insulation and last year it worked well. I used stainless rivets to put ours together. Our furnace requires a 6" flue but the 5.5 works well and even then it was almost too much draft at times.
     
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  10. HJsimpson

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    Burning Hunk

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    That was another option i was looking at. Was it the type you mix with water or dry? I also have a clean out below the thimble if your is like that how did you keep it from flowing clean through?
     
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  11. Wood Heat Stoves

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    $3000. sounds really high for labor. I would get more estimates if there are more installers in your area. You could do it yourself with Dura Liner oval pipe, which is already insulated. You'd need to be able to choose the proper parts for your installation. Here's a link to the installation instructions so you can see if it's something you'd want to do yourself.

    http://www.duravent.com/docs/product/L402_Apr2011.pdf
     
  12. laynes69

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    The cleanout was eliminated. I eliminated the cleanout and used a fill material to close it off. I didn't use the mix and pour insulation. I was told from local sweeps that wasn't the stuff to use. Our existing liner was in good shape so I used vermiculite. If I could have found perilite I would have used that. I was worried about having no cleanout but realized after burning a EPA unit it wasnt needed.
     
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  13. leeave96

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    The price sounds way high. I had a shorter run, but paid around $2K for a rigid 6 inch liner with 1/2 inch insulation wrap. This also included busting out the flue tiles - which was the easiest part.

    I had quotes for upwards of $5K and wacky install recommendations from 5.5 inch with no liner to 7 inch liner - "cus the 6 and 8 inch liners don't draft as well as a 7"

    I am very happy with my liner install and feel very safe with it being up to code.

    Good luck,
    Bill
     
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  14. HJsimpson

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    Burning Hunk

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    The oval liner may just do the trick but does the tee have the strap to attach from the inside since i have no access to the tee from the outside? I just want to go the safest route possible. I had a access hole framed in while doing the roof so i wont need a ladder to get up there i just go through the attic. Just need a short ladder to climb to top of chimney to make cleaning a lot easier and safer.
     
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  15. laynes69

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    I built a platform from 2x4's to allow me to work at waist level. I wasn't comfortable working from a ladder leaning on a chimney 30' in the air. I left it up there and it makes for easy access and cleaning while not using a ladder. Our old house has a roof access also. It's a mansard roof and allows easy access.
     
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  16. begreen

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    The joints get fastened with stainless pop rivets. The pipe has predrilled holes for this. It won't come apart.

    Product catalog:
    http://www.duravent.com/docs/product/DuraLiner_2011cat_web.pdf

    Duraliner installation instructions:
    http://www.duravent.com/docs/product/L402_Apr2011.pdf
     
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