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You know you're a redneck if (aka let's start a garden discussion)

Post in 'The Green Room' started by Mrs. Krabappel, Jan 30, 2011.

  1. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I love it. You're a man after my own heart. You should write a book Dave. How do you manage the compost with your cooler temps?

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  2. Mrs. Krabappel

    Mrs. Krabappel Minister of Fire

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    You've given me an idea. I have been getting rid of my tater tires, but I may re-comission them. Were they easier to cut along that seam?
  3. RNLA

    RNLA Minister of Fire

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    Nice, I wonder what others do too.
  4. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    I use my stiff bladed very sharp hunting knife, right near the tread, cut thru easy. Sharp is key so you don't slip by pushing to hard.
    Now inverting them takes a little practice, but once you do a few, you find the easy way, "self teacher kinda thing".
    I do potato tires like this:

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  5. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Takes about a year here. New bin (made it out of some pieces of a GH I lost in a wind storm, double walled to help hold in some heat so it cooks longer & thaws sooner) started every Sept mixed with garden plants, leaves & fresh grass clippings. cooks into Dec then freezes, In the spring when it thaws, I mix in some fresh grass clippings to heat it up so it'll cook, done by mid August, empty in the "done" bin.
    Then I scored several ton of Horse Manure, few tons a year (but recently lot my supply). So I have 2 to 3 HM working piles. then I run it through it through a manual screen plant & it goes into "done" storage bins.
    Got several yards stored & covered so it don't get leeched out from rain/snowmelt etc. Got one small bin using 3 pallets as sides for kitchen scraps etc thru the summer

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  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Nice. We have to be really careful of horse manure here because of the usage of herbicides to grow weed free hay. These poisons are persistent for several years and really mess up certain crops like beans and peas. So now we stay away from horse manure.

    When do you find time to split wood? :)
  7. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Learning to retire isn't easy, I thought it was going to be "live Hawaii for the winter, AK in the summers" LOL.
    I got lots on the "to do list" that I saved up. Not enough time to retire yet, but working on it.
    Who did it when I was working? ** I got that one :it didn't get "done", was just close enough to done to get by.

    **Redneck screening plant** with vibrating electric sander

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  8. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    Good deal on that! The last roll I bought about that length was close to $100 if I remember correctly.

  9. semipro

    semipro Minister of Fire

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    My gardening has really not gone well the last few seasons. I can't seem to find the time to devote to it.

    You guys have impressive gardens. I feel my determination growing. :)
  10. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

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    I am going to get more serious about fencing this year so that I can grow a wider range of crops. Potatoes and onions have been staples here because they are among the few crops that can grow outside the backyard fence without being eaten by groundhogs, rabbits, and deer. Someone asked about onions, and they are among the easiest foods to grow in my experience. The simplest way to go is to purchase either sets (imature onion bulbs) or plants in the spring. Some of the sweet onions like walla walla and 'Vidalia' onions are sold as plants. Onion seeds are tiny and a slower way to edible onions, so start with sets or plants. Just turn over a bed and plant the sets or plants around May. Keep the weeds down and you should get decent onions. Rich soil will give bigger onions, but any soil and indiiferent care should still yield some useful onions. I haven't seen a lot of pests on my onions through many years of gardening around the US.

    I am also planning some food crops for my chickens, who are probably on the front porch right now. They don't like to stand in the snow, so right now that means they are hanging out either in the coop, the driveway, or the porch. I plan on creating some areas of clover lawn and beds of sunflower which will also include lots of Giant Foxtail Millet that springs up everywhere. I have winter rye right now, and they eat that but it is covered in snow. I hope they can get to it next week after the predicted warm spell.
  11. Mrs. Krabappel

    Mrs. Krabappel Minister of Fire

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    Great idea. Will you keep it fenced while the plants mature?
  12. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

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    I hope I can get away with not fencing. We have a couple of acres for the chickens to range, and in the spring and summer there is plenty for them to eat. I hope I can grow crops that will feed them through late fall and the part of winter before it snows. Knowing how chickens are, they will probably ignore all the other food and eat the seedlings I am trying to grow for them. If I had to bet I'd bet I'll be putting up fence.

    I have been trying to get the chickens to turn over and fertilize garden beds by moving their mobile coop and pen over the bed and leaving them there for a couple of days. I think they are not hungry enough. They do a little turning and lots of fertilizing, but I still have work to do before I can plant.
  13. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    We have been thinking about chickens, but it seems ducks might be better. How do you avoid the chickens eating young plants or fruit like strawberries if they are not kept out of the garden when these crops are present? How do you deal with predators like raccoons?
  14. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Oh, I missed this picture. I love it! How well does it work? I have an old sander that really vibrates. It would be great for this purpose. Do you have any shots taken at another angle? I want to make one.
  15. szmaine

    szmaine New Member

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    Have you had duck eggs? I ask because, they are not eggs-actly like chicken eggs and some people don't like them. I don't like them egg-cept in baking, and mixed with chicken eggs they make a truly superior omelet but not by themselves - rubbery.
  16. dvellone

    dvellone Feeling the Heat

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    I'll contribute how we handle the chickens... It's a sore spot for me! We live in the woods and have a great watchdog who is outside 24/7 and so we never have had an issue with deer, rabbits, raccoons or chicken predators (our chickens free range all daylight hours and we sometimes forget to close them in at night).
    We have two gardens, one large and one small, as well as berries, herb gardens and ornamental shrubs, fruit trees, flowers etc...
    Our problem is that we've had to fence in everything to keep the chickens away! Even the lilac bushes, apple trees, and plum trees because they will scratch so deeply at the mulch around the trees that they'll expose the roots and spread the mulch all over the place. This past year they got into my main garden and scratched two 30' rows of newly sprouted carrots and removed every bit of the mulch that was on my garlic (dry soil and I need the mulch to hold in some moisture.)

    So, although I started out not needing a single bit fence to protect my plants from deer etc... I've had to fence in everything I've planted to keep the chickens from scratching and tearing up plants, exposing roots, and decimating my hard-earned mulch.

    So, the answer to your question is fence, fence and more fence! Or chicken and biscuits! You can also fence the chickens in and therein I've revealed the depths of my stupidity.
  17. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    No I haven't and I am not as fond of duck meat as I am chicken. Thanks for the tip. What I like about ducks is that they don't scratch up the soil as much and they love our ubiquitous pest - the slug.
  18. szmaine

    szmaine New Member

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    What about building a chicken tractor?

    I'd like to get chickens too. I've been eyeballing the 1971 IH Travelall which recently blew it's transmission as a potential coop - earn the coveted redneck status in the bargain.
  19. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    A chicken tractor is what I had in mind. A few local folks have done this. Great for the initial clearing of the beds.
  20. Mrs. Krabappel

    Mrs. Krabappel Minister of Fire

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    Bantams *might* not be so devastating, but the big girls are hard on many small plants. I have heard from many folks that ducks are a PITA. I can't tractor my chickens. I get too much pleasure and relaxation watching them do their rounds. Nothing better than sitting out with a beer on a warm afternoon and watching the biddies. Pitiful, I know, but that's my life now! :lol:
  21. szmaine

    szmaine New Member

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    Chicken manure is great stuff! At work I get significant quantities of samples from a large egg producer every couple of months.
    We dry it for moisture content analysis. I fill up 5 gal pails with it and bring it home for composting my shredded leaves and other yard waste. That really makes some hot, fast compost - nearly fell over from the ammonia 1st time I ever turned it. I make about
    8 cu yds a year this way.
  22. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

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    My chickens sleep in a chicken tractor with a solidly built coop built in. We originally intended to keep them in there all the time, but somewhere along the way we started letting them out and now that is standard practice. I like to have them out so that can eat a more natural diet, even though with the tractor they have access to our weedy lawn or garden, depending where the tractor is parked. When they are out they do scratch avidly and can be a pain. I have to fence gardens for rabbits and groundhogs anyway, so the fencing isn't a new thing, but we have mulch tossed about all the time in the unfenced garden beds.

    Overall I have found our chickens are a lot less trouble than I might have expected. They return to the coop by themselves every evening, they lay all their egg in the nest box inside the coop, and we have not had predator problems yet. We have a feeder and waterer that hold enough for a couple of days, so all we need is to lock them up at night and let them out in the morning. We are anticipating that one day one or more chickens will be killed by a predator. That is the chance we and the chickens take in exchange for free ranging. In terms of overall effort required, I think chickens are harder than a cat, easier than a dog (although I haven't actually owned a cat, so I am just guessing). The eggs are much better than eggs you can buy in a store.
  23. Mrs. Krabappel

    Mrs. Krabappel Minister of Fire

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    Much easier to harvest than cat eggs too. :lol: And more delicious.

    I've had zero predator trouble so far except dogs. My own beast (now he knows better) and a visiting friend's dog. I even have bantams plus a hungry pair of red-shouldered hawks who nest here every year. Most problem predators are out at night when they are in the coop.

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