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You tell me how you push your stove.

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Augie, Jan 22, 2013.

  1. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    I've been running the insert fan on high. Noisy, but I think it throws more heat.

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  2. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

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    Hog , I guess your right , there is a certain amount of btu's in the wood your burning. If you burn at a higher rate your gonna waste more btu's up the flue.
    So getting the heat faster or getting it over the longer time span , there is only so many btu's in that load of wood in the stove.

    Only thing I would say is after getting home from work and before loading up at bed time, I would like to get as much heat built up in the house as possible.

    But that can cause another issue lots of coals. So I am thinking maybe use a wood that doesnt make coals during that time frame.
  3. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Who's your Daddy? ;)
    pen likes this.
  4. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Reloading more often.
    Using the bigger splits . . . and doing full loads.
    Going for the better BTU wood when I find it in the stack.

    And . . . using the oil boiler . . . I figure I don't rely on it that often . . . but when temps are near zero or sub zero it definitely helps even out the heat a bit better . . . figure it can't hurt things since I'm not in a contest to see who uses the least amount of oil/propane/natural gas, etc. . . . plus running some heat through the whole house should insure no frozen pipes anywhere.
  5. dja950

    dja950 New Member

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    No pushing here, stove just does its thing. Only "problem" (not really that big of a problem to say) is with the increased cold, theres an increased draft and it runs about 75 degrees hotter than normal even with the air turned down more than normal. Did my normal routine, left for work last night and came home 17 hrs later still a solid amount of coals for a quick restart. Inside temps were maybe 3 to 4 degrees colder when i got home, but it was also below zero degrees F. Cant complain, love this wood stove. I thought for sure I was gonna come home to a 50 degree house after being away for 17 hours. I was very relieved and surprised when i open the door and it was still warm.
  6. Laurent Cyr

    Laurent Cyr Member

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    Quebec, Canada
    It`s -24F right now. Was -41F last night.
    Pretty hard to keep the temperature up in the house during these cold nights. Electric forced air kicked on at 67F on first floor. Jotul is in the basement and the warm air just isn`t finding its way upstairs, even with the fans and cut-outs in the floor. Benn cold like this since November. I`m running out of seasoned wood.
    Time to think about having a second smaller stove on the first floor.
    My wife will kill me.........:))

    L.

    Huntindog1 likes this.
  7. dja950

    dja950 New Member

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    One would think just about any heat source is gonna struggle in -41, keepin a whole house in the mid 60s at that temperature is pretty impressive to me
  8. Laurent Cyr

    Laurent Cyr Member

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    This is my first year with a wood stove. I don`t have the choice of good hardwood in my area. I have a wood lot, but most of the available wood is aspen and pine. I had 7 cords of 1 year seasoned aspen and pine. The burn season started early in November. I`m going through this wood really fast. The wood burns fast and hot. I burn 24/7, so now I`m pretty much out of seasoned wood. They sell hardwood around here, but at the price they are asking for, I might as well heat electric. And they don't deliver. And the stuff they sell is probably not dry anyway.
    My only option is to go out and cut standing dead wood on my lot. But it needs to get a little warmer before I do that. It will be fun to bring that wood out on foot. There's 3-4 feet of snow in the bush, and I don't have a snowmobile. So, it'll be snowshoes and sled. Eesh! Live and learn. Next year, I'll be ready...

    L.


  9. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    You've been through 7 full cords of that wood this winter, so far?
  10. Laurent Cyr

    Laurent Cyr Member

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    For me, a cord is 4 foot high, 8 feet long and 16 inches. I`ve been through 7 cords of that.
    When people on the forum talk about burning a cord of wood, do they mean a full cord (4x4x8) or a small cord?
    Anyway, yeah...bummer for me.

  11. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Whew. That's more like it. Sorry about running out...
  12. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    In my area, people would refer to that as a face cord (1/3 of a cord).

    7 face cords would be 2 and 1/3 actual cords of wood, which for being softwoods, isn't too bad for your area to this point in the winter in my opinion.

    pen
  13. northwinds

    northwinds Minister of Fire

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    Your small cord is usually called a face cord around here. (I'm too slow--pen finished as I typed) :)

    You're dealing with some serious low temps. Best of luck. Post often. It makes the rest of us feel like it's not so cold outside. :)
  14. Laurent Cyr

    Laurent Cyr Member

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    So, if I`m correct, most of you go through 3 full cords of wood per winter? Is that about right?
    The temperatures we are having are extreme. With the wind chill factor, it`s more like -50 today.
    I brought the dog in last night, because I find cold temperatures like that are just too hard on animals, even if they have an insulated dog house and heat lamp. The damp cold is hard on their joints.
    When I brought the dog out this morning at 06:00am, you could hear the snap, crackle and pop happening out in the bush. Just a couple more days of this, and then the temperatures will be closer to 0. We usually get thes extremes in February. Jeez!!

  15. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    I'd say it's more like 4 cords/year that I see people post.
  16. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    We are running the Fireview air set at "1" or even "1 1/4" instaed of the usual "3/4". Going with some flame in the box and glowing cat. This keeps the stovetop at around 600 for the first few hours rather than 500. Reloading every 6-7 hours, and dumping ash (into covered steel can) every other day rather than once a week. The furnace is helping too now. My old place is just too drafty for the Fireview to keep us comfortable in teen and single digit temps. I doubt more stove might do it either. We are just loosing too much. This is the first time we have had all 4 zones of heat running since some time in 2011 so I can't complain that much. Extended forecast calls for 40s and rain ate next week. We'll be back to wood heat only again.
  17. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

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    We call it a Rick of Wood around these parts.
  18. Machria

    Machria Minister of Fire

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    4 cords avg burn per winter around here? WOW!

    That is alot of wood to be burnin... I don't think I could burn that much wood in the PH if I ran it 24x7, at full bore 7 days a week all winter. That just seems like alot to me.
  19. Laurent Cyr

    Laurent Cyr Member

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    Well, I believe it for my part of the woods. I started heating with the wood stove on November 1, right after my install. Temperatures had dropped considerably by then. I know I`ll need to heat until at least April. That`s six months of heating 24/7. After 3 months of heating, I`m at 2 and 1/3 cords, heating with Aspen and pine.
    L.

  20. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

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    Don't forget, ovens can be used to bake cookies and cakes, while they're keeping the house warm!
  21. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    We take advantage of that. In this weather, something is going in the oven for supper. Gotta eat something anyway and a few extra btu's won't hurt a thing.
  22. gmule

    gmule Feeling the Heat

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    Not really pushing the Fireview it just does it's thing
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  23. Kaptain

    Kaptain Member

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    I made the mistake of keeping too much ash in the nc 30 before this cold snap. Not only did that take up space but it prevented the abundance of coals from burning down fast enough.

    I removed a ton of them tonight and now things are working the way they should. I also brought in 2 loads of black locust to mix with my oak so I'll be cruising at 700 for a few hours and then a full load before bed.
    Huntindog1 likes this.
  24. tsquini

    tsquini Minister of Fire

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    I typically don't have run the stove at its top end range. What I am finding is that I don't open up the air intake to get the splits going. At 550 - 600*, I have been rake the coals to the back and the splits to the front and with in a few second they flaming. The temp drops for a bit but it starts raising again and cruises around 550.

    Another question, Do you use the damper more or less in the cold?
  25. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Made bread yesterday, cookies today.:cool:

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