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  1. Rubicon 327

    Rubicon 327 Member

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    Just curious as to what some of the temperatures are that you all are getting out of your pellet stoves? I have a friend who has a Summers Heat and on the #2 setting I believe he said he was getting 180 °F air, said he couldn't hold his had in front of it for very long.

    What are some of your findings with your unit?

    Please Share. ;-)

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  2. pelletdude

    pelletdude Feeling the Heat

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    250 degrees out of the Enviro M55 in our showroom burning Greenway Hardwood
  3. jtakeman

    jtakeman Minister of Fire

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    With my Enviro Omega I have seen as high as 275ºF on heat setting 3 feed trim 3 with Cubex :) . And as low as 185ºF with the inferior Inferno's. :sick:

    All depends on what pellet I toss in the hopper and I can afford to burn. That is just the air temp not the stove temp. Stove temp is much higher. Burnpot is higher yet.(using IR gun)
  4. MCPO

    MCPO Minister of Fire

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    #2 setting relative to the heat temperature could be meaningless on an Englander. The #2 setting is normally a low burn on an Englander and probably not the most efficient burn either. 180 degrees on #2 sounds pretty high to me but if his feed rate is high and / or depending if the stove is in c,b, or a heat mode then it`s probably possible he`s getting those temps.
    And what kind of thermometer is he using and where exactly is it placed and how far away is it , or does it have a probe tip (meat thermometer) and is this probe resting inside a heat tube? Is he reading the stove body temp ? a magnetic heat indicator? Also think about how different blower speeds and CFM`s effect temps..
    And he`s right, 180 degrees of hot air is not something I can hold on the back of my hand for too long.
  5. jtakeman

    jtakeman Minister of Fire

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    Yes indeed. You also have to consider the heat exchanger efficiency. Each design will differ. If the heat exchanger efficiency is similar and the exact pounds per hour burn(most stove have very different feed rates). Using the exactly the same pellet you should be close in numbers. But it will not be nowhere exact, We have a hard time seeing exact with the same stove, At the same setting and using the same pellets. There will most likely be a margin of error.

    Good to see some numbers posted with different stoves and different pellets. Maybe it can help show which stoves may have better heat exchangers. But I highly doubt we will get enough people to post to see any real data. This of course being air temp not stove temp. Stove temp rules out the heat exchanger. I think we should focus on that if anything. Its a big key to how well the stove performs.

    Just my 2 cents worth!
    jay
  6. krooser

    krooser Minister of Fire

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    My St. Croix Pepin, with my new batch of Bear Mountain's, has been running at 240F on setting #1 (out of 6) and 260F on #2. I haven't had it set any higher due to the mild weather.
  7. Rubicon 327

    Rubicon 327 Member

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    I was just looking for a general temp cause I am having issues with my unit and was trying to get a feal as to what is an average that you all are getting.

    Example: With my unit that I just got going Wednesday I am only getting about 120 °F temp max so far and I just want to make sure I have all my info so I can know a little about what I am talking about when I call their customer service. I know I am not comparing apples to apples (my unit to evreryone elses) but at least I know I have some real issues by the way I am reading your posts.......especially when I am only getting the temps I am getting.

    Thanks for the info guy's I do appreciate it very much :exclaim: Hope fully I will get to the bottom of this without much problems from them (US Stove Co).
  8. jtakeman

    jtakeman Minister of Fire

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    I am not totally sure. As I don't own a us stove. But there is a thread that may help:

    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/46097/

    I think there similar to the US Stove units. Maybe even the same control. They figured out how to get the heat out of the stoves.

    Check it out
    jay
  9. Rubicon 327

    Rubicon 327 Member

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    Thanks jtakeman,

    I just read through it but unfortunately I don't have the same settings as they do.

    When I called customer service today and told the woman my problem she thinks it's because I don't have it hooked into a central duct system %-P Even if I had, I'm still not getting the temps I should from it as I have restricted the output air flow for a bit and it only went up a few degrees.

    She had me change the pellet flow rate by doing something the manual doesn't tell you how to do and that helped a few degrees from say 110 °F or so to about 118 °F but not what I really wanted to see.
  10. mscj

    mscj New Member

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    What pellets are you burning (or did I miss that above)? My 6039 varies wildly on temp according to the pellet quality.....I think the heat exchanger efficiency is the price we pay for the lower cost stove.
  11. SmokeyTheBear

    SmokeyTheBear Minister of Fire

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    It isn't the temperature it is the volume of air and the temperature that counts.

    If you are getting 180 CFM of air at 120 degrees and they are getting 90 CFM of air at 240 degrees the heat transfer into the room is the same.

    So be very careful about making comparisons based upon a thermometer it can be very misleading.
  12. jtakeman

    jtakeman Minister of Fire

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    All my heats are with 180 CFM if you need to know.
  13. SmokeyTheBear

    SmokeyTheBear Minister of Fire

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    Jay, does that mean your convection fan is rated at 180 CFM or is that the measured flow through the exchanger at the time of measurement?

    There be a difference as you are well aware.

    I'm on the prowl for a slightly heftier convection blower as I'd like to be able to get a bit more of the heat out of my stove. Not really having much luck finding things that match up likely I'll have to download several catalogs to really match things up. Why the stove builders couldn't use standard parts is beyond me. No wonder when things went nuts in 2008 there were so many stove problems.
  14. jtakeman

    jtakeman Minister of Fire

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    SmokeyTheBear, I just redid the math and it comes to 172 CFM. 200 CFM fan varied down to 103 volts. My control varies the fan speed per heat setting. Heat setting 3 is 103 volts to the fan.

    I think its right now?
    jay
  15. ChandlerR

    ChandlerR Minister of Fire

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    First, my temps range from 129 degrees on heat setting 1 to a high of 300 degrees on heat setting 5. This was burning Cubex. Temps are 15 to 20 degrees cooler with Lignetics or Okanagans. As Jay and Smokey said, the heat delivered through the heat exchanger tubes is an arbitrary number. I would never compare my numbers to, say, Jay's Enviro because of all the differences in design, airflow (Tube diameter, CFM of the blower, ect) and other factors that affect the heated air temps. I use my numbers for my own reference. How efficiantly my stove is operating. I can look at my readout and know right away that my tubes need cleaning with the scraper deally. Also, I have noticed a huge difference in the temp readings from tube to tube. I have two rows of 12 tubes. Obviously the upper row is cooler and the lower row has a 30 to 50 degree variance in temps from left to right. I have my thermocouple in the hottest tube on the lower row.

    Chan
  16. SmokeyTheBear

    SmokeyTheBear Minister of Fire

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    I just didn't want the OP to go away with the impression that a single number indicates something is wrong or right when in fact it may not be. Too many things to consider.
  17. mscj

    mscj New Member

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    jtakeman, where exactly do you measure your temps? 6" out from the air outlet, inside the stove, etc? I just have a simple 6" meat thermometer clipped to the air vent in the center air outlet hole, so in actuality it measures temp 4-5 inches inside the stove. According to the specs I found, mine is a 200cfm blower (on setting 9 of 9 I would assume).
  18. jtakeman

    jtakeman Minister of Fire

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    I measure about 3" away(out from) the heat exchanger. I got a picture somewhere.

    SmokeyTheBear,

    I know what your saying(I just wanted the right number out there). It will be another variable that has to be delt with. If I had a smaller fan I would say my temps would be much higher and Much lower with a larger fan with more air circulated.

    By the way. If I need more CFM's. I can steal a blower from my sister stove(the maxx) it has a 455 CFM fan. Maybe you have a sister stove that has a larger fan and you can borrow it for yours?
    jay

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  19. schoondog

    schoondog Feeling the Heat

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    Rubicon,
    What USStove do you have? As someone mentioned in a prior post, I believe the "cheap" part of my stove is the heat exchanger. I have the 6039i and I can tell you at the center vent hole, in the botton of the hole I have a small 6' digital thermometer that will read all sorts of temps depending on what level I am running the stove in (1-9) in auto, or a "custom" setting, or what kind of pellet or corn I am burning. Right now I have a load of Penningtons in on level 3 auto and I'm at 155*. If I put Lignetics or Marths in and go to 6 auto I will be at 200-205* I rarely go above 6 for any length of time. I can go to manual andslow the fan down and kick auger speed up for more heat, but with fan speed down I'm still not delivering any more heat to my home. ( as smokey was talking about). I can also effect the heat readings by adjusting my damper slightly.

    Schoondog
  20. Rubicon 327

    Rubicon 327 Member

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    Loc:
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    I am burning "Maine Woods" Premium Wood Pellets that I got at Tractor Supply When I bought the unit.
    It is a US Stove model 6500 multi fuel furnace......which I think is a problem right there. I don't know what CFM the fan is blowing at but it is like a normal forced air system(pretty darn fast) but I would like to think that It would blow warmer temps than what I am getting.

    The unit is rated at between 50,000 and 105,00 btu/hr and a heating capacity of 1200 - 2800 sq. ft. and able to hold 320 lbs of pellets. It has 5 heat ranges and the blower automatically adjusts it's speed to the heat range you set it at (no manual over ride)....that they have admitted to yet anyway.

    I have mainly operated it at level 3 and 5. Level 3 gives me a high 90 +°F temp with a lower blower fan speed, and 5 gives me about 120 °F at a higher blower fan speed. I have played with the draft fan-damper-agitator speed you name it and I have not seen anything above 120 °F and that didn't even happen until I increased the "pellet feed rate" way above the original setting which was originally set at 14.25 when I was on the phone with customer service and she had me change it to 14.75. Which I had gained 5-7 degrees or so and that got me to around 110 °F Then after an hour or so of it not getting any better I bumped it up to 18.50 or something which got me up to my 120 °F mark.

    So before I called Cust Svc and made the changes she had instructed, my highest temps were around 110-115°F on level 5.
  21. MCPO

    MCPO Minister of Fire

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    Try this link over into this forum. There are some 6500 users there that can probably help with comparison heat outputs and othe things: And when you get to the bottom of the page click on the page box , jump to go and the 6500 topics are abundant.
    good luck.

    http://forum.iburncorn.com/viewtopic.php?t=11997&sid=06b37e39b9e0a2f3c98f3c44b91795d5

    This link tells me that there are (2 ) 800 cfm fans in that furnace that pump out 1600cfm when both are running. Check this topic:
    http://forum.iburncorn.com/viewtopic.php?t=12437
  22. SmokeyTheBear

    SmokeyTheBear Minister of Fire

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    Your multi-fuel furnace and that is what it is, has 2 800 CFM blowers, it would make a mockery out of comparing air output temperatures with any of the "normal" pellet stoves that most folk operate. At level 5 the air flow would be a whopping 1600 CFM which is 8.9 to 16.8 times that of most of the pellet stoves on the market.

    That device was meant to be attached to duct work with zone dampers.
  23. Rubicon 327

    Rubicon 327 Member

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    Thanks Gio!

    I will check it out.



  24. Rubicon 327

    Rubicon 327 Member

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    SmokeyThe Bear,

    I agree with you 100% on what you are saying about the blower but the manual makes it sound like it can also be used by it's self as a stand alone heater and doesn't really say you need to hook it up to duct work for it to work correctly.If however that is true I still believe I should be getting warmer air temps than I am because by the time it travels through the duct work ...say 15-20 feet and finally exits it will have probably lost 10-15 °F or more and now I'm back to 100-105 °F or less air blowing out of the duct work 15-20 feeet away from the unit.

    Out of my oil fired furnace in the same building I was getting 140 °F ait temps and that was after it blew across the A/C coil and about 10 ft of duct work to the 1st closest register.




  25. SmokeyTheBear

    SmokeyTheBear Minister of Fire

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    What is the air flow on the blower in your oil furnace, its firing rate, and so on. However the question you asked of others here on the forum actually causes a comparison between things that vary by a factor of at least 8. Apples to Oranges comes to my mind.

    Heat output isn't measured by a thermometer.

    You can use it as a stand alone heater, but the beast was designed to move air as a hot air furnace. Its cold air input should be fairly widely separated from its outputs. If you wish to know why drop me a PM.

    A lot of the folks that find their way to this forum complain about how long it takes for their room temperature to rise after having fallen overnight or how to get a bit more heat into a room at the end of the hall. You have the means and the duct work to do it quite easily. Others moan when they get told not to attempt a basement install, then go ahead do a basement install, find out the folks that said don't were correct, and so forth. To stop heat loss in duct work you seal the joints and insulate the ducts. Some folks come here looking for assurances that their favorite pick for a stove is correct but fail to divulge any information about their intended use or the building it is going to be used in, then they are back when it can't quite handle the job wondering what happened. So sometimes some of us (in this case me) get a bit out of joint when we see apples being compared to oranges resulting in grapes (any variety).

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