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Your opinion of this stove - it's a Saey Scope

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by olive wood, Nov 27, 2007.

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  1. olive wood

    olive wood Member

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    Hello everyone. I'm a Brit and over here we don't have quite as wide a choice in stoves as you lucky people. I have looked around for a while and the Saey Scope will not go away. I'm a function over form person and bearing that in mind maybe some of you knowledgeables would like to tell me what you think.

    Maybe these links will help
    http://www.stovesonline.co.uk/wood_burning_stoves/Saey-Scope-woodburner.html
    http://www.geastufe.com/stufelegna.htm
    http://www.e-stove.net/images/cataloge/saey-scope-manual.pdf

    The Italian site responds to Babelfish and the English version of the manual is towards the end of the PDF file.

    Oh, I nearly forgot, it's got an O.A.K. option!

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  2. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Looks nice actually. What are you looking to heat with it? Area? 1 or 2 story?
    I am a bit confused as it says the baffles drop down when loading to avoid smoke. Will this limit loading capacity? Meaning will a full load block the baffles from coming back up at door closing?
  3. titan

    titan Minister of Fire

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    I like it."impressive yet restrained"-agreed.Roughly 38000 btu"s?
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Looks like an interesting stove. At first pass I like it. It is a respectably sized stove. How do they do the side door? I looked at the 3D model and couldn't see any seam for the door.
  5. olive wood

    olive wood Member

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    Thanks for the input.

    The sides of the stove hinge from the rear - swinging the RH cover would reveal the side loading door. Air is drawn up through the inside of the "legs". travels up between these sides and the stove body, then emerges from the slots you can see. One of the reasons I like the stove is it seems to be a good compromise between radiant and convective heat.

    11x3414 ....... yes, I guess so.

    The usable firebox would seem to be 14"x21"x9.5"h.

    I split my time between the UK and the island of Crete in Greece. This stove would be going to Greece. The small house I have there is at 1000ft. - winter temperatures seldom drop below freezing but the humidity can cut through you like a knife. All of the external walls are of rendered 22” stone and earth construction. The roof is tiled with an east-west ridge. Windows are generally small and of the single glazed timber variety; drafts are not a problem but the house is in no way airtight. The floor (excepting 6.25sqr m of stone in the kitchen) and 3m high ceiling of the upper level are of substantial tongue and grooved pine. This level totals 145c.m. Glass totals 2.9sqr m. The ceiling is airtight. An open stair case leads to the basement.

    The two rooms at either end of this level are effectively sealed store rooms in no need of heat. The remaining area (34cm) has a 2m ceiling (the floor above) and the only basement window (0.25sqr m glass). The floor is stone.

    The house is built into a hill, the southern aspect of the lower level is underground, and this affords a reasonable degree of insulation. The upper level is sheltered to the south and east. The north is completely exposed, the west partially so. Hopefully you will find an attached floor plan.

    In the past I briefly used a Jotul F602n with a Greek style “chimney” (120mm pipe, 4 90deg bends, 5m run internally and a 3m external stack) or should I say creosote plant! I’m now thinking short vertical stove pipe and then twin wall insulated stainless internal stack exiting the roof just south of the ridge. I realise the Jotul would be far more efficient with this arrangement but think I need more heat, a larger firebox and maybe a convector to avoid baking the stove’s immediate surroundings. I would also like to see the fire but don’t think I want to get involved with cats, wood driven radiators or hot water.

    Attached Files:

  6. Mike Wilson

    Mike Wilson New Member

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    Glad to see you made it out of the Ash Can. Notwithstanding that, welcome aboard.

    I reviewed the stove, and think it is an interesting design. One item I noted on the photographs was that the secondary air inlet is located on the bottom of the back panel. I have never seen a stove with the secondary air ports at the lower rear of the stove. Normally (over here, at least), the secondary air ports are on a baffle or tubes located on the top of the stove, so that the hot gasses can rise, meet with the secondary air being released at the top of the stove, and reburn in secondary combustion. perhaps the moving baffle design of this stove prohibits this. 38K BTUs is a respectable size, but not too large, and if you enjoy the look of this stove, there are some others available on your side which could be options. Scan, Jotul, and Westfire come to mind from my time spent there.

    -- Mike
  7. olive wood

    olive wood Member

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    Glad to see you have not taken any lasting offense Mike - championing the underdog is a traditional Brit trait! The secondary air arrives through the top of the stove and also provides the glass airwash, the primary is fed below the grate but still allows for a build up of ash. The air inlet at the bottom of the back panel is a tertiary or third air supply - a slow bleed which is pre set and not adjustable. I think I'm hooked on this thing..........
  8. Mike Wilson

    Mike Wilson New Member

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  9. swestall

    swestall Minister of Fire

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    Looks nice, have you seen it burn? And, can you get parts easily if you need them. My two questions. Hope it all gets you HOT...
    :cheese:
  10. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I'd like to try one! It sounds like a well thought out stove of about the Jotul Castine size. It should work fine. Actually I think it might be overkill, but with a direct northern exposure, you will be dealing with steady meltemi (sp?) winds from the north. What will be interesting is how well it does with small fires. For a lot of the time, I think that will be what you are burning in it.

    Where on Crete? I fell in love with Chania, it's a magical spot. I hope to go back again sometime.
  11. olive wood

    olive wood Member

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    Thanks for the welcome. Don't know about the intrigue; next time I checked after posting in the Ash Can the thread was pulled! BTW never seen a forum that was successfully moderated by an owner - understandable - they're just too close.

    These things are not common in the UK. I've spoken to one owner; he's happy but it's early days for him so limited feedback. Waiting to speak to another guy. Parts are no problem.

    I've thought a lot about the overkill thing. Thing is, the winter humidity is such that you virtually have to burn it out of the air. I knew the 602 was never going to be enough stove and after a whole load of looking the Saey, on paper, seemed the best bet. If I can't land the small fire thing I'll just blame BB - he persuaded me it should be an option! Crete's a nice place to be. The UK and US are places where society is policed. Crete is a place where society polices itself. The house is in a small village on the Aporkornos peninsular, on the north coast midway between Chania and Rethymnon. Be Green, if you're missing Hania, this is for you - http://www.webcam-chania-crete.com/
  12. ozarkjeep

    ozarkjeep New Member

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    that is a really interesting and neat looking stove.

    I like all of the features, one thing that I would want to understand better are the folding dampers.
    after having and using a couple of stoves, its hard to envision things folding as well after getting HOT as they did when new.

    But, I assume it could be designed in with certain metallurgy and temp control.

    it is a very nice looking stove!
    please report back and post some photos if you buy and use it!
  13. olive wood

    olive wood Member

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    Ozark, I'm 99% sure it's going to happen...... but the install probably will not be until March/April 08. If it goes ahead I'll post pictures.
  14. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Well the more I look at the stove the more I like. It seems to have a well thought out design. I see that we can buy a few of their coal stoves here in the states.
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