Classic bay 1200 struck by lightening

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ztnark

New Member
Oct 26, 2021
7
Carbondale, Pennsylvania
I'm not sure if I'm in the right forum or not but here goes. First off my local service center has two techs, 200 service calls and one tech out with covid. So I guess I have to try to trouble shoot my problem myself. About a month ago we had a terrible lighting storm here. My stove is plugged into the same outlet as my tv. The storm blew out my television set hdmi card. I just tried to turn on my stove after all summer and it's totally dead. No power at all. The fuse is not blown, and the thermostat checks out. I can't locate the # 3 snap disc to see if it's tripped. Can someone tell me where I might find it? Secondly could the control box be fried? Is there anyway to test it?. Thanks in advance for any help.
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
Board time. Bet you didn't have a surge suppressor. If you did, your flat screen and the stove most likely would have survived. As usual I suggest a Tripp-Lite 2 outlet Isobar receptacle mounted surge suppressor. Amazon has them for 32 bucks, just bought one and ignore the reviews. The reviewers failed to hard mount it to the receptacle. It's designed to secure to the outlet faceplate center screw which also grounds it.
 

Oregun

Burning Hunk
Jan 12, 2017
134
Oregon
Board time. Bet you didn't have a surge suppressor. If you did, your flat screen and the stove most likely would have survived. As usual I suggest a Tripp-Lite 2 outlet Isobar receptacle mounted surge suppressor. Amazon has them for 32 bucks, just bought one and ignore the reviews. The reviewers failed to hard mount it to the receptacle. It's designed to secure to the outlet faceplate center screw which also grounds it.
The problems with that Tripp-Lite suppressor appear to be on numerous units that the connector comes apart when you try to remove it from the wall outlet. If you never remove it then it may work fine.
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
It's not designed to remove and replace. It's designed to hard mount to the outlet and stay there. I have one btw and just bought another. The case has a metal lug on it that fastens to the center of the outlet box (Tripp-Lite provides a longer screw with it).

People using it as it's not designed for are the ones having issues which is why I said, ignore the negative reviews. Because those reviewers are not using it as it was designed for. Plainly states that in the instructions btw.

If people actually read the included instructions they would understand the principles of use. Kind of like how people never read stove manuals and then have issues and come on here for resolution. 99% of those issues are addressed in the owners manual. Same with the Tripp-Lite surge suppressor.

Those reviewers are pugging it in, unplugging it and plugging it back in numerous times and that isn't how it works plus, the ground lug has to be physically secured to the center screw on the outlet to earth the suppressor properly.

Why my signature line says what it says...
 
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SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
I don't see where the Tripp-Lite has a problem. The problem is the users aren't following simple and explicit instructions. Nothing more.
 

Oregun

Burning Hunk
Jan 12, 2017
134
Oregon
I don't think they should come apart when simply unplugging them. Dangerous since 120v may still be connected. Nothing is installed forever.
 

ztnark

New Member
Oct 26, 2021
7
Carbondale, Pennsylvania
Board time. Bet you didn't have a surge suppressor. If you did, your flat screen and the stove most likely would have survived. As usual I suggest a Tripp-Lite 2 outlet Isobar receptacle mounted surge suppressor. Amazon has them for 32 bucks, just bought one and ignore the reviews. The reviewers failed to hard mount it to the receptacle. It's designed to secure to the outlet faceplate center screw which also grounds it.
Yes I had an outlet mounted surge protector also, but it's an older model and obviously failed.
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
I don't think they should come apart when simply unplugging them. Dangerous since 120v may still be connected. Nothing is installed forever.
Whatever. Lots of us on here use them with no issue.
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
Yes I had an outlet mounted surge protector also, but it's an older model and obviously failed.
Usually once the clamp, they are done. The Tripp-Lite will tell you that. The green LED changes to red.