Cleaning stove pipe, problems resassembling.

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joea

New Member
Nov 20, 2021
7
NY
Had this Kodiak free standing stove for a number of years. Most years I have cleaned the 6" stove, with a "dog leg" at the ceiling transition by running the brush down from the roof til it hit the dog leg. Then would disassemble the interior pipe to clean it. Re-assembly was always a pain, but always got done.

Last year, I purchased a couple "flexible" cleaning rods and with a bit of effort manage to get through the dog leg. Which consists of two short 45degree bends put together. Why it was done that way rather than properly, as a straight shot through the roof is a sore topic.

In any case, this year, perhaps due to advanced age I was unable to get past the bend and resorted to dis-assembly again. Now, I can't get it back together. The problem appears to be that the one section of "telescoping" pipe is very, very, reluctant to move , so I cannot close the gap in the pipe.

I am not sure of the manufacturer but it is black wall pipe, appears to be double wall, with stainless inner pipe. The bends look to be just single wall. The transition piece to the attic/roof says metalbestos. The label on the stove collar is rather buggered up but "DSP " is legible.

Any ideas why this pipe will no longer telescope and how to fix it? Or am I better off just buying a new telescoping pipe?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
93,151
South Puget Sound, WA
Telescoping pipe can bind. You may need to get persuasive with it. Make sure there isn't a screw still in it locking down the telescope.
 

joea

New Member
Nov 20, 2021
7
NY
Telescoping pipe can bind. You may need to get persuasive with it. Make sure there isn't a screw still in it locking down the telescope.
No screw left in. I managed to make it "longer", with difficulty, but the problem will come in once I shorten it to get the bits in place, then attempt to stretch it out again. I cannot imagine a way to lubricate it other than water, that would not be a fire or health hazard, or just stink badly.

What increases the difficulty is the transition collar to the stove is not secured, the installer never made any attempt to do so. So with a binding pipe, the entire assembly moves up away from the stove when I lift. There are holes in the stove which do not match the ones in the collar. I guess I could drill new holes in the transition collar and make something to hold it. Even a few nails might do it.
 

marty319

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2014
502
Belair mb
I know the feeling,that telescopic pipe can be a real pain,your pipe should be held to the stove collar with 3 screws then you will be able to make the pipe join up at the elbows
 
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joea

New Member
Nov 20, 2021
7
NY
No screw left in. I managed to make it "longer", with difficulty, but the problem will come in once I shorten it to get the bits in place, then attempt to stretch it out again. I cannot imagine a way to lubricate it other than water, that would not be a fire or health hazard, or just stink badly.

What increases the difficulty is the transition collar to the stove is not secured, the installer never made any attempt to do so. So with a binding pipe, the entire assembly moves up away from the stove when I lift. There are holes in the stove which do not match the ones in the collar. I guess I could drill new holes in the transition collar and make something to hold it. Even a few nails might do it.

I was never happy with the "professional dealer" installation. The collar transition piece was never attached to the stove collar, just relied on the weight of the pipe. Had been around for a while with no bad raps, that I knew of, but soon went out of business.

The reason I mentioned nails is the collar on the stove, the thick welded on steel bit, has no threads in the three holes provided. To use screws I must tap the existing holes. Too thick for self tapping being about 3/16 or so. It is something I can do,, having the tools, but wonder if it should be done and was a factory oversight.
 
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marty319

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2014
502
Belair mb
Do not have to drill holes,I used self tapping with no issues on my osburn. Once you have the pipe secured to the stove collar you can move the telescopic pipe up and down though it will be a little bit of a struggle but not like the way you are doing it.
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
6,541
07462
I occasionally have issues with my dvl pipe binding. Mine is a 60" adjustable, what I normally do is just take the whole thing apart, with a damp rag I just wipe down the one sliding inner piece, put it back together then slip it back on the stove, I always work down though so I re-attach it to the ceiling support box then gently pull it down to the stove collar, since you have elbows I dont know how well thats going to work.
 

joea

New Member
Nov 20, 2021
7
NY
Do not have to drill holes,I used self tapping with no issues on my osburn. Once you have the pipe secured to the stove collar you can move the telescopic pipe up and down though it will be a little bit of a struggle but not like the way you are doing it.
The holes are there already, just holes, no threads. I guess I can try self tapping but this is way thicker than sheet metal. And, this particular transition piece (collar?) has a bit of "play" being wider than the stove collar, so will deform a bit when I do screw it down. Only a visual problem, I guess.
 

marty319

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2014
502
Belair mb
I have 2 45's on mine,I take out the 3 screws at the top then pull the pipe down,then I remove screws on the collar and remove pipe.to install I put screws in collar then pull pipe up the chiney adapter.no issues this way

20211121_083443.jpg
 

joea

New Member
Nov 20, 2021
7
NY
I occasionally have issues with my dvl pipe binding. Mine is a 60" adjustable, what I normally do is just take the whole thing apart, with a damp rag I just wipe down the one sliding inner piece, put it back together then slip it back on the stove, I always work down though so I re-attach it to the ceiling support box then gently pull it down to the stove collar, since you have elbows I dont know how well thats going to work.
I've never completely removed it, but, tight as it is now, I may have to try that. I have to use a "persuader" to move it now and doubt I can do that once in position without creating dents, or worse.
 

joea

New Member
Nov 20, 2021
7
NY
I have 2 45's on mine,I take out the 3 screws at the top then pull the pipe down,then I remove screws on the collar and remove pipe.to install I put screws in collar then pull pipe up the chiney adapter.no issues this way

View attachment 285941
That is just how mine looks, the ceiling transition being "flatter". Thanks for the picture. Nice to know I'm not totally inept having to take down the pipe.
 

joea

New Member
Nov 20, 2021
7
NY
I ended up having to clamp the male end in a vise, supporting the pipe with some "roller stands". Then had to "gently persuade" the inner pipe to come out. One I got it moving simple exertion got it all the way out. That is when I found the inner pipe wall of the outer telescope piece was not well centered. Once it was centered the inner telescope could slide through it's entire range with relative ease.

Also drilled holes in the collar adapter to match the stove collar and put in some screws. They do not hold it "fast" being unable to tap into the thick stove collar but do stick in far enough to resist upward pulling force. That made it relatively easy to reinstall the pipe by screwing in the bottom and pulling up on the telescoping pipe.

However, I am troubled by the ceiling transition. The end facing the living space has what appears to be a crimped "male" connector, such that the male "crimped" end of the upper 45 elbow, instead of fitting inside of the joint, goes over it, in effect being a "female" end. There is a "band" screws in around it that covers the joint.

It has always been this way, and always troubled me, but, since it never seemed to accumulate much soot I just let it go. Now I realize that I always ran the brush down before taking it apart, so, could have knocked out any "excessive" accumulation.

Is this a concern? Or am I looking for problems where there are none?
20211122_185921.jpg