Fisher Goldilocks won't shut down! Help

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JoshColorado

New Member
Jan 4, 2022
3
Colorado
Recently moved into a mobile home. Have a fisher Goldilocks, downloaded the manual, replaced some brick, cleaned out out and started running it. I can not get this stove to shut down. I wouldn't say it goes full bore all the time but with the 'bear o matic' flap closed it is for sure still getting quite a bit of air somehow. Got up in the middle of the night and it's glowing red!

I am absolutely sure the flap in front is fully closing. The air has to be coming in through the doors correct? This is my first Fisher, I was under the impression they didn't use a door gasket, or am I wrong. I like the stove, but I really need to get this figured out, thanks in advance
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,589
NE PA
Look under the stove, under air intake flap. There is a ash clean out for what falls through the intake air screen inside. Make sure it is closed and seals. ( this prevents it from pulling any air out of the home)

Some had 2 wing nuts on studs to hold closed at ends, some have only one stud front and center. Open door with a catch tray under it, clean edge of stove bottom and flap. Reach up into clean out area and clean the sealing area where the air intake flap closes. Ash build up there can prevent intake flap closing fully. I do that with a gloved finger every time I clean the intake clean out.

Be sure back of doors where they contact door seal on stove front are clean. Wire wheel if necessary. ( both doors and seal) It should go down to a glow with little to no flame when closed.

You can go around it with an incense stick watching for smoke to be pulled in at any leaks.
 

JoshColorado

New Member
Jan 4, 2022
3
Colorado
Look under the stove, under air intake flap. There is a ash clean out for what falls through the intake air screen inside. Make sure it is closed and seals.

Some had 2 wing nuts on studs to hold closed at ends, some have only one stud front and center. Open door with a catch tray under it, clean edge of stove bottom and flap. Packed ash or a small stick could have gotten on it when closed and may not be closing fully. Reach up into clean out area and clean the sealing area where the air intake flap closes. Ash build up there can prevent closing fully. I do that with a gloved finger every time I clean the intake clean out.

Be sure back of doors where they contact door seal on stove front are clean. Wire wheel if necessary. It should go down to a glow with little to no flame when closed.

You can go around it with an incense stick watching for smoke to be pulled in at any leaks.
I'll double check all that, but I did a thorough cleaning before lighting, including the air flap and ash clean out.

I was able to slide a piece of paper around between the door channel after it was shut, so I'm still thinking it's the doors
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,589
NE PA
The door seal is the 1 inch channel iron on stove front. It should make contact on the back of doors all the way around in places. The doors have a raised area that contacts the center of the channel iron web. The edges of channel iron contact the back of doors. That should be good enough without gasket.

When door hinges or pins wear, doors can become loose. Keeping hinge pins greased decreases any wear. Same as the threaded bolt on left draft cap. Silver anti-seize or high temp greases prevents wear of threads on cap or door.

You can see by opening right door, close left, close air. The air adjusting bolt should close flap fully and start to open door. If the bolt end wears, or flap tang sticking up is bent, a cap nut on the threaded rod lengthens the bolt and gives the end a round top. This radius of the cap prevents wear of the bolt end.
 

JoshColorado

New Member
Jan 4, 2022
3
Colorado
Yeah, I have a pretty good understanding of how the stove and door seal work. The air flap is absolutely for sure closing all the way, and the stove still ripped through my wood.

I'll try a small fire and the incense trick, in my mind there is no other possible way the air is getting in other than the doors. Even if the flap wasn't completely closed(it is) my fire should have at least gone down to a low/low-medium. Last night my fire was a medium-high. Burned through a fully loaded firebox in about 2 hours
 

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,589
NE PA
Put a strip of cardboard in the seal channel. See if doors close with no problem. Add another until tight, or will not close properly. Then you know the clearance available for a crushed gasket. Flat gasket for glass cemented in door channel, not round is the thinnest.

It prevents the doors from making any noise when closing in the middle of the night when you get your significant other trained to tend the fire while you sleep too.::-)