HARD TO HEAT HOUSE DURING WINDY DAYS

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Todd

Minister of Fire
Nov 19, 2005
9,368
NW Wisconsin
Anyone else seem to notice this? Today the temp was around 32 with a gusty wind of maybe 20mph. I got home from work and it was 67 upstairs, 70 downstairs with the stove. I loaded up the stove and have been burning it hot since 4pm. Temp is 69 upstairs now. Usually if the temp is 32 outside with little wind the house would be roasting by now. Even if the temp is below zero with no wind it gets hotter than this. It seems that wind can really suck away the houses heat.

More ammunition to talk wife into insert for upstairs fireplace. :) I'm going to look at a Magnum corn burner this weekend.
 

Homefire

New Member
Jan 16, 2006
275
Yep , that happens when wind blows.
A natural thing.
 

Corey

Minister of Fire
Nov 19, 2005
2,539
Midwest
I have never really noticed it to be terribly dramatic with me, but the wind could strip heat from the house from more draft through windows/doors, stripping more heat from the walls in general, etc.

Corey
 

MountainStoveGuy

Minister of Fire
Jan 23, 2006
3,654
Boulder County
I havent realy noticed either, but it makes sense. I think house contruction might play a part. My house is only a few years old, and in the dry climate i live in i built it super tight.
 

laynes69

Minister of Fire
Oct 2, 2006
2,565
Ashland OH
Well I thought we did bad last night, guess not. I loaded the furnace at 9:00 pm and at that time the house was 76 with temps outside in the high 20's with windgusts. When I woke up at 5:00 this morning, the house was 70 degrees and the firebox was half full of coals. Normally the house would be a few degrees warmer, but the wind was gusting close to 20 mph with chills in the teens. 70 is cold for us, but the gas furnace is set for 68 so we didn't use any gas. Its doing what its supposed to. By the time I left at 5:40 am the house was 72 and climbing. Temps are dipping lower tonight. The house heats well until we get those bone chilling winds, then it burns at full bore to keep up with the heating demand. Im sure a newer house would be easier, but we have alot of little air leaks, which add up fast.
 

DriftWood

Minister of Fire
Apr 5, 2006
718
Bluewater Area, Great Lakes
Wind will blow the cold air in and suck the hot air out. My 1980s Andersen dubble pane replacement windows leak so bad at the sash joint ,top and bottom I am sealing them with rope caulk every winter. Check your house for air leaks on a cold windy day by just holding your hand near any opening it your walls, doors, windows,electrical boxes light boxes, ect. seal up all the drafts you find should help.
 

babalu87

New Member
Nov 23, 2005
1,440
middleborough, ma.
Imagine how hard the boiler had to work especially if, like me you have FHW (pipes on the outside walls) stoke er up.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
86,515
South Puget Sound, WA
Get thee a caulking gun! Use Great Stuff for the big gaps. In a pinch, get out some masking tape and seal up those leaks. Consider blocking your crawlspace vents until it warms up again (unless you have a swimming pool in there).
 

laynes69

Minister of Fire
Oct 2, 2006
2,565
Ashland OH
Great Stuff has paid for itself 10 times over. Awesome stuff, Stops the worse of drafts and leaks. And caulk is good too. I guess now theres a caulk that can be applied with a caulking gun, then once the seasons over it will peel right off.
 

Roospike

New Member
Nov 19, 2005
2,859
Eastern Nebraska
Real high winds might only cost me an extra 2-3 splits in 24 hours time in my 100 y/o house but its been modernized and totally insulated so that and windows is going to be the biggest factor.
 

BrotherBart

Modestorator
Staff member
With bedrooms on the corners of a house you can caulk till you turn green and they will get colder with wind whipping around them.
 

Rhone

Minister of Fire
Nov 21, 2005
827
Yeah, I sure notice the wind. For an overnight burn when it's 20F outside when I get up in the morning the house is usually 67-68F but, be it a windy night and I'll wake up to a house that's 63-64F instead.
 

Jay H

New Member
Nov 20, 2006
659
NJ
Great stuff is awesome but it is sometimes TOO expanding and absolutely wear gloves when using it. I used it once without it thinking that I'm only going to be patching a few holes and it is a bear to get off your skin, if at all, I had to basically use a bit of sandpaper and wipe off the outer layer of skin to get it to remove.

What I find too is DAP makes a similar product that is not as expanding as GS and the straw is a lot easier to clear after use. In fact, Great Stuff states on the can that you can't expect more than one use of the can so categorize all your holes and gaps you want to seal and try to use GS in one big shot. Warm water and a pipe cleaner can be used on the straw hopefully to prevent the thing from gumming up.

Jay
 
Jay H said:
Great stuff is awesome but it is sometimes TOO expanding and absolutely wear gloves when using it. I used it once without it thinking that I'm only going to be patching a few holes and it is a bear to get off your skin, if at all, I had to basically use a bit of sandpaper and wipe off the outer layer of skin to get it to remove.

What I find too is DAP makes a similar product that is not as expanding as GS and the straw is a lot easier to clear after use. In fact, Great Stuff states on the can that you can't expect more than one use of the can so categorize all your holes and gaps you want to seal and try to use GS in one big shot. Warm water and a pipe cleaner can be used on the straw hopefully to prevent the thing from gumming up.

Jay
I've read that "one use" statement on the great stuff. All you have to do is let some of the foam form a plug at the end of the tube. Make sure the base of the tube is screwed down tight. When you want to reuse it just pull out the plug. It helps to bend the tube a little bit to get the sides of the plug off the walls of the tube. If the tube itself gets clogged use a piece of wire clothes hanger to clear it out and you'll be back in business. I've started cans, then gone back 2 months later and have still be able to use them.

-Kevin
 

Henz

New Member
Mar 23, 2006
1,735
Northville, NY
I fell you pain! my house, built in 1850, is like swiss cheese..I have been working on the insulation for a year now and still dont have it down to where I want it..It seems like you need a really cold day in order to find out where you really need to ass the insulation..I found another spot this morning in my built-in broom closet! Would freeze a glass of water if you left it there guarenteed. Anyays, about the Great Stuff..They make a window version that will not expand nearly as much..
 

Xena

Minister of Fire
Nov 30, 2005
2,494
South Shore MA
No problems here on windy days.
House is about 50 yrs old but
well insulated and recently got
all new replacement windows.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
86,515
South Puget Sound, WA
We have been in 15 - 25 mph north, 32 degree cold, winds all day. Our old farmhouse is a lot tighter since the foundation work, caulking, insulating and new windows. It's taking a little more wood to heat, but not too bad so far.
 
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