How to burn coal rice in pellet stoves?

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SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
. You can wash with baking soda and water solution to neutralize the acids.
I have the same issue with corn but with me, it's nitric acid. Roasting corn, when it 'carmalizes' just before it ignites, it gives off nitric acid vapor which condenses in the venting because it's cooler than the stove itself. It combines with the soot from combustion and it will eat the stainless liner in the pellet venting eventually, so I take mine apart every year and wash the inside of the venting with ZEP Purple Power and my pressure washer and clean all the deposited soot and nitric condensed vapor out. If I don't, the nitric will eat the liner out.

Why, just before end of heating season, I run straight pellets for a few days at a high burn rate to rid the stove itself of the nitric condensed vapor. Even doing that, the interior of the stove (steel firebox) get's etched a bit. The disadvantage of burning corn.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,444
central pa
The standard install for coal is single walled galvanized flue pipe. You can get five to ten years out them. The larger issue is shutdown for the season, once the moisture gets to it that's a big problem. You can wash with baking soda and water solution to neutralize the acids. We had same pipe for 30 years but it was heavier gauge and that boiler was never shut down. They were only replaced becsue the house caught fire and had to be demolsihed, boiler was moved to new location beforehand. Current set is not as good as quality, they have more than ten years on them and they are holding up pretty well.
Single wall galvanized connector pipe not flue pipe. Using single wall pipe as the flue is not at all acceptable.
 
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thecoalman

Member
Jul 18, 2008
37
Coal Country
coalpail.com
Perhaps I have been misunderstood but single walled galvanized pipe is and always has been standard install between the unit and the thimble for coal appliance. Coal stoves are much more efficient than wood units because they typically have convoluted path for gases, flue temps are much lower. On most boilers for example the gases exit below the burn pot/bed. If it's been idling for about half hour I can put my hand right on the pipe.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,444
central pa
Perhaps I have been misunderstood but single walled galvanized pipe is and always has been standard install between the unit and the thimble for coal appliance. Coal stoves are much more efficient than wood units because they typically have convoluted path for gases, flue temps are much lower. On most boilers for example the gases exit below the burn pot/bed. If it's been idling for about half hour I can put my hand right on the pipe.
Yes that is correct. That is called connector pipe not flue pipe. The flue is the actual chimney passage. Simple misunderstanding like that can cause dangerous situations for some people who don't know better. I assumed you were talking about connector which is perfectly fine as long as it is for coal only. Galvanized isn't acceptable for wood use.